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10

The best way is to convert this shape file to file-geodatabase and build the topology in ArcGIS for "Must Not Gaps" and "Must Not Overlap". Important thing in building topology is cluster tolerance. This is tolerance in which topology will remove/fix errors automatically after validating. So you should select this tolerance very carefully as big values can ...


5

Data for US federal lands can be found through the GeoCommunicator site. However, it does not cover the entire country. For private parcels data are much less accessible. For these data you generally have to go to the GIS department for the county, or if there isn't one you may even have to digitize paper maps/plats. Some private companies, such as ...


5

If you have an ArcEditor or ArcInfo license, you can use ArcGIS' Parcel Fabric tool. In the parcel fabric, parcels can be divided by area to create new parcels. Using the parcel division tool, you can divide parcels using the following area-based division methods: In equal widths By proportional area Into equal areas I assume you ...


4

I think you will want to create a parcel fabric


4

Create lookup tables like @GeoKelvin discribed. Or use tool Domain To Table to create a lookup table. Join lookup table to feature class Export feature class to Shapefile You can automate this with Modellbuilder.


3

In ArcMap - you could do the following: Select the polygon you want to copy. Open the Python window and type in the following code: cur,row = None, None cur = arcpy.SearchCursor("NAME OF THE LAYER HERE") x = 113 for row in cur: shp = row.getValue("SHAPE") cur,row = None, None cur = arcpy.InsertCursor("NAME OF THE LAYER HERE") for i in range(0,x): ...


3

I think this is an excellent question and an ideal candidate for an ArcGIS Idea (if there is not already one). The Online Help for Multipart Polygons says (with my bolding): Keep in mind that parts in a multipart polygon are spatially separated. They can touch each other at vertices, but they cannot share edges or overlap. When you are sketching a ...


3

Report All website has a large data archive of parcel data per state/county (some states and counties are not included). You can purchase data per county via shapefile, kml, or excel.


3

It sounds like what you want to do is write an expression for your label instead of simply choosing a "Label" field. On the Label tab of the Layer Properties: Choose the "Expression" button: Here, you can see that I have entered the following: "Parcel Number = " & [APN] The first part of this: "Parcel Number = ", is simply a text string The second ...


2

I would think using intersects would work. Let's say pid is your parcel ids SELECT p1.pid, array_agg(b2.pid) As neighbors FROM parcels As p1 INNER JOIN parcels As b2 ON ST_Intersects(p1.geom, b2.geom) WHERE p1.pid != b2.pid GROUP BY p1.pid If you would prefer a string instead of an array and are using PostgreSQL 9.0+, you can use string_agg(b2.pid, ...


2

I have tried to make the possible solution simpler but it seems to be the only solution, but i like to have any suggestions . from polygons make lines (arcs) => lines. buffer polygons with 3m => polygon_buffer. make spatial join between polygon_buffer and lines with "one to many" , to get all the polygons touching the lines => sp_lines_buffer. for every ...


2

Honestly, you sound like just the kind of person Esri developed parcel fabrics for. I would recommend watching (or at least skimming) this hour-long webinar to see just what you can (and can't) do with parcel fabrics.


2

Get Spatial's answer above is probably the preferred method, in that it directly addresses labeling. If, however, you have some reason for wanting this concatenated string of two fields to be persistent in your data source, you could add a new add a field to your table and create the value there and use the new field as your label. Open the table. Select ...


2

Another alternative would be to use the Eliminate (Data Management) tool in Arc. However, I agree with iRfAn and Roy that topology rules would be the best practice in your case if you are looking for a long term solution. Source: ESRI


2

I have an idea how you you iteratively work from large blocks down to smaller blocks using FME (by Safe Software.) For the record I don't work for them but seem to praise their tool enough... Use "BoundingBoxReplacer" on the area of interest. Reproject it to a local coordinate system (for later when you need to "tile" in feet/meters.) Buffer the lines with ...


2

Using topology, the two features can be easily hemmed together using the Topology Edit Trace Tool and the Reshape Edge Tool, both found on the Topology Toolbar. Note that in this example, unselected nodes are symbolized, which is found in the editing options on the Topology tab (pic). This is optional but helpful. Your data (approximation): Step 2. Using ...


2

You could do it with Python, but if you are unfamiliar with Arcpy, it's a simple field calculation. Add a new text field and use this in field calculator. CODE BLOCK: def domain(field): if field == 1: return "Integrated Registered Survey Plan" elif field == 2: return "Survey Plan" elif field == 3: return "Geo-Referenced Air Photography" elif field == ...


2

If you want a new shapefile, containing just some of the existing parcels, but no others, simply query for, or select the ones you want, then right-click on the layer select Data, then Export Data. If you have an existing shapefile follow the advise of @Maksim


1

Either make a selection of the polygons you need, right click, copy, then paste into your new shapefile in the interactive window. Or, use append, to add the selected polygons to a shapefile of your choosing.


1

The simple way would be to use Select Layer by Attribute to select the focused parcel, then use Select Layer By Location using "share a line segment with the source layer feature" as the spatial selection method, see caption below: This method may then be incorporated into a Model or saved and wrapped around a python script to generate a table export or ...


1

In order to accomplish your task, your workflow could go something like this: Ensure you polygons have some sort of unique_id on them Convert your polygon vertices to points (maintaining the unique_id on each point) Run a near analysis for the points to the roads Run a statistics on the results of the near to find the maximum distance from a road for each ...


1

Since editing the fabric through a topology is a no-go, I've explored other options and found a workaround. First, some background: Optimally, you should be directly able to edit a parcel's COGO attributes to eliminate slivers and gaps in your parcel data such as in my situation above. ESRI for whatever reason does not want this (If you open a parcel for ...


1

I'm not sure which version of ArcGIS you are working with, or if you've come across this since posting, but in version 10.1 there is an environment setting under "Fields" called "Transfer Field Domain Descriptions" (http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#/Transfer_Domain_Descriptions/001w00000049000000/). I've used it on occasion in the ...


1

There is an Esri Technical Article on this (don't be put off by it only going up to ArcGIS 9.3.1 because it still applies at 10.1). Try the instructions there and, if you have any problems, perhaps edit your question to describe the steps you have done and where you may need further assistance. A quick description is: Start Editing Create two polygons - ...


1

Maponics would be it. I used to update the data they now use and it is the best in class, historicaly it was tele atlas data 'multinet', maponics spun off for the uses you describe. Nationwide polygon data would be very expensive i expect. a way to create a cheaper and much less accurate coverage would be use tiger data and polygonize by zipcode.


1

use the make query tool in data management. arcgis resource center says it like this. I just saw this 1:M tip on arcgis support website. There does seem to be some other usable information here. Quick tip to perform 1:Many join


1

check out the 'feature to line' tool within the Data Management Tools-->Features toolbox. This should help you. You'll need to convert your polygons to lines and then you can label based on the length field.



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