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34

At a high level the way I choose is based on whether users are inexperienced and need nothing more than points, lines and polygons. Shapefiles are ideal for this. If they need annotation, domains for pick lists and validation, raster, etc then use File Geodatabases which are easy to use, fast and can be massive in size. I would never use Personal ...


12

It can be viewed in Quantum GIS, a popular open source desktop gis application. Choose Layer > Add Vector Layer and select Personal Geodatabase from File Types. It will display all feature classes. But advanced ESRI features like Network and Topology will not be visible.


10

According to the GDAL docs: OGR optionally supports reading ESRI Personal GeoDatabase .mdb files via ODBC. Personal GeoDatabase is a Microsoft Access database with a set of tables defined by ESRI for holding geodatabase metadata, and with geometry for features held in a BLOB column in a custom format (essentially Shapefile geometry fragments). ...


9

I try to avoid using shapefiles as you cannot store domains, relationships, aliases etc. but they are the most portable format when distributing data to other people who are using different GIS systems/tools. Whilst file geodatabases give better performance and are capable of storing huge datasets, everyone above is giving the humble personal geodatabase a ...


8

It looks like there are a few things that can cause an Access database to grow excessively. Row Locking is discussed in this Stackexchange question: MS-Access database getting very large during inserts It looks like the suggested solution is to turn off Row-Locking in the database. This is something that is turned off on the Access database itself, not ...


8

It is possible that there is something wrong with resolution and tolerance in PGDB. Take a look at sections X,y resolution and X,y tolerance in this topic. Try increasing these values. What coordinate system are you using? What values are set for resolution and tolerance?


7

You are in for a world of hurt (but I know that part of the answer doesn't help). If you don't mind the reduced speed - put it on a network share where only a few users have write permissions to the file and the others only have read. From ESRI-L (in the comment below) Give all users full file permissions to the folder (allowing them to create, read and ...


7

I would try the Describe Workspace release property http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#/Workspace_properties/018v0000002v000000/


7

Close all ESRI applications. Then only start the one where you will do the editing (eg. Arcmap). This will release all locks that are on your data from other applications, which are interfering with your data manipulation. If it still doesn't work, also try to restart your computer.


6

Here's an ArcObjects + comtypes solution that works for me at 10.0: import arcpy from ESRICOMHelpers import GetESRIModule, CType, NewObj def GetGDBReleaseVersion(gdbPath): """Gets the release version of the given geodatabase.""" esriGeoDatabase = GetESRIModule("esriGeoDatabase") esriGeoprocessing = GetESRIModule("esriGeoprocessing") ...


6

QGIS uses the OGR library for the majority of it's GIS format access. The Personal GDB access falls under this grouping. Based on the OGR Vector Format's page here: OGR Vector Formats The ESRI Personal GeoDatabase driver does not have Creation support.


6

To answer the first part of your question, I think it helps to look at the additional text in the Creating Attribute Indexes help file about Multi-column indexes. The order in which fields appear in a multicolumn index is important. In a multicolumn index with column A preceding column B, column A will be used to conduct the initial search. Also, ...


5

There are at least 9 top reasons to use File Geodatabase over Personal Geodatabase. Unfortunately, there are still a lot more reasons to keep the old PGDB around; your dilemma being one of them. (no ESRI publication on this topic) I believe the primary purpose of FGDB over PGDB is storage capacity and performance of spatial data (drawing speed, retrieval, ...


5

Most people would recommend storing your data in a database for performance reasons, i.e quick to query and search. However I believe there is also the benefit of currency when data is in a database. For example, if you pass a shapefile to a colleague they are likely to use that indefinitely but the data may have been updated. Where as if the data was stored ...


5

I generally use FGDBs, but it really depends on what you need to store. Like the other posts have mentioned, Personal GDBs are outdated and have size issues. Using a geodatabase allows you to set up a topology, which you can't do with plain shapefiles. Shapefiles hold the exact coordinates of the shapes. In a GDB, the locations are snapped to the nearest ...


5

File geodatabases (FGDB): A FGDB may contain feature datasets, which aid in coordinate system control and data integrity via topology rules. You are on your own with shapefiles. FC's may be up to 256 TB in size with the use of configuration keywords. All component files of a shapefile are limited to 2GB each (source & whitepaper). FC performance is ...


4

Another advantage of a fgdb over shapefiles is that features in a fgdb can have true curves. In shapefiles, curves are composed of arbitrarily small straight line segments. I'm not sure about personal gdbs.


4

To try and understand your Question, I have reviewed the Creating a Python Add-In Combo Box help page to remind me that ... A combo box contains an editable field and a drop-down list. The user can select a value from the drop-down list, which appears at the user's request. If you make the combo box editable, the combo box will include an editable ...


4

you need to use this code within ArcMap and the field calculator. Add your feature class in the table of content, right click on it to open the table, right click on the name of the field and launch the field calculator. Then you check for codeblock and copy the code you mentioned. now for your code snippets, here is what I would do rec=0 def ...


3

The free TatukGIS viewer will open ESRI personal geodatabases. It is not open source.


3

As I understand it, you're saying your mdb has multiple tables (e.g., a table for "municipal water systems", a table for "sewer systems", etc), and you want to get the feature count for a specific table. If that's the case, you can just get the feature count of the specific table (dataset/layer/etc) name that you want to look at. if layer.GetName() == ...


3

It is a little difficult to understand your problem without hearing what your code outputs. I don't know if it is a cut and pase error or not, but I am guessing that you want to indent the last three lines of your code so that they get executed within the loop. import osgeo.ogr as ogr driver = ogr.GetDriverByName('PGeo') ds = driver.Open(database) ...


3

A simple copy and paste of PGDB feature classes or feature datasets to SDE geodatabase in ArcCatalog should work (if you have admin rights on SDE database).


3

Try opening the database using Access and deleting the geometry there. It's easy to miss a table here and there if you are deleting things by hand; that particular error message has gotten me on a number of occasions.


3

It looks like you may be having an issue with the resolution setting of your Feature Dataset. Since you are using a Feature Dataset, you need to set an appropriate XY Tolerance, as mentioned in step 7 of the article "Creating a feature dataset". By default the XY tolerance should be sufficient (and in the case of WGS84, the resolution units are degrees). ...


3

Esri's online help (see two links below as examples) discourages users from opening Personal Geodatabases stored in Microsoft Access using Access so I think your phrase "futile because pgdb technology is proprietary and no detailed publicly available knowledge exists" probably sums it up. http://support.esri.com/es/knowledgebase/techarticles/detail/31599 ...


3

if you want full-blown geodatabase capability (Coded Value Domains, Relationship Classes, Topologies, Geometric Networks, etc blah blah, without the complexity or admin overhead of relational geodatabase, AND/OR you want the fastest drawing, cursor, and geoprocessing performance, File Geodatabase is the way to go. Local disc access is much faster than a ...


3

You can use the AccessWorkspaceFactory instead. There are (at least) 3 ways to connect to a personal geodatabase. The simplest is probably the IWorkspaceFactory.OpenFromFile method, e.g.: //For example, pathToFile= "C:\\myData\\mypGDB.mdb". static IWorkspace openFromFile_pGDB_Workspace(String pathToFile)throws Exception{ IWorkspaceFactory ...


3

I think the short answer is no. You would need an sde gdb to make the second replica. The esri distributed database model is fully and clearly documented. In the Esri pdf doc- The following describes each technique: „ Geodatabase replication: Geodatabase replication allows you to distribute data across two or more geodatabases such that edits can be ...


3

you should rather change the display so that you don't duplicate your field. 1) Open your attribute table 2) right click on the name of your field 3) select "properties" 4) Press the icon next to "numeric" 5) select percentage : the number represent a fraction 6) go to the option for rounding (number of decimal places set to 0 )



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