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34

At a high level the way I choose is based on whether users are inexperienced and need nothing more than points, lines and polygons. Shapefiles are ideal for this. If they need annotation, domains for pick lists and validation, raster, etc then use File Geodatabases which are easy to use, fast and can be massive in size. I would never use Personal ...


8

I try to avoid using shapefiles as you cannot store domains, relationships, aliases etc. but they are the most portable format when distributing data to other people who are using different GIS systems/tools. Whilst file geodatabases give better performance and are capable of storing huge datasets, everyone above is giving the humble personal geodatabase a ...


7

Close all ESRI applications. Then only start the one where you will do the editing (eg. Arcmap). This will release all locks that are on your data from other applications, which are interfering with your data manipulation. If it still doesn't work, also try to restart your computer.


5

I generally use FGDBs, but it really depends on what you need to store. Like the other posts have mentioned, Personal GDBs are outdated and have size issues. Using a geodatabase allows you to set up a topology, which you can't do with plain shapefiles. Shapefiles hold the exact coordinates of the shapes. In a GDB, the locations are snapped to the nearest ...


5

Most people would recommend storing your data in a database for performance reasons, i.e quick to query and search. However I believe there is also the benefit of currency when data is in a database. For example, if you pass a shapefile to a colleague they are likely to use that indefinitely but the data may have been updated. Where as if the data was stored ...


5

File geodatabases (FGDB): A FGDB may contain feature datasets, which aid in coordinate system control and data integrity via topology rules. You are on your own with shapefiles. FC's may be up to 256 TB in size with the use of configuration keywords. All component files of a shapefile are limited to 2GB each (source & whitepaper). FC performance is ...


4

Another advantage of a fgdb over shapefiles is that features in a fgdb can have true curves. In shapefiles, curves are composed of arbitrarily small straight line segments. I'm not sure about personal gdbs.


4

To try and understand your Question, I have reviewed the Creating a Python Add-In Combo Box help page to remind me that ... A combo box contains an editable field and a drop-down list. The user can select a value from the drop-down list, which appears at the user's request. If you make the combo box editable, the combo box will include an editable ...


4

you need to use this code within ArcMap and the field calculator. Add your feature class in the table of content, right click on it to open the table, right click on the name of the field and launch the field calculator. Then you check for codeblock and copy the code you mentioned. now for your code snippets, here is what I would do rec=0 def ...


3

you should rather change the display so that you don't duplicate your field. 1) Open your attribute table 2) right click on the name of your field 3) select "properties" 4) Press the icon next to "numeric" 5) select percentage : the number represent a fraction 6) go to the option for rounding (number of decimal places set to 0 )


3

if you want full-blown geodatabase capability (Coded Value Domains, Relationship Classes, Topologies, Geometric Networks, etc blah blah, without the complexity or admin overhead of relational geodatabase, AND/OR you want the fastest drawing, cursor, and geoprocessing performance, File Geodatabase is the way to go. Local disc access is much faster than a ...


2

Use the following in your field calculation with the Python parser: round(!yourFieldHere!, 2) * 100


2

If you are looking to backup your geodatabase entirely, then this is the simplest approach. Create a windows batch file that copies your geodatabase to your media and add it to the scheduled task at midnight. Here is the script, copy it and paste it on a new Notepad window and save it as backupgdb.bat. Replace C:\Data\mygeodatabase.gdb path in the code with ...


2

I would say the easiest way to backup a geodatabase (aside from just copying and pasting it within ArcCatalog) is to create a new one and 'load' the data you want to preserve into it. You could potentially add your thumb drive to ArcCatalog, create a new empty file gdb on your thumb drive and then right-click the new gdb and 'load' the data from the already ...


2

you can remove the extension then put it back and it will not affect your data, but I don't really see the point: if you don't touch it you will not change it either. Note that the file gdb is a directory, so you are still in danger that one of the files gets deleted : afterremoving the extension it will look (and behave) like any other directory. I would ...


2

I am unable to test this at 10.1 but I just tried Export Data on a layer (with shapefile source) in the Table of Contents at 10.2 on Windows 7 SP1 (64bit) and both personal and file geodatabases show up in the browse dialog when I set Save as type to "File and Personal Geodatabase feature classes". I will be surprised if this was not working and went ...


2

QGIS would most likely be relying on the GDAL driver for Personal Geodatabases support which currently only supports read capability (so no creation or writing to one). You can see some info on the PGeo driver at http://gdal.org/drv_pgeo.html


2

It sounds like you want to do a summary statistics with a min and max of NUMEXT and a case field of CVEFT. This will give you a table with every instance of CVEFT and the minimum and maximum NUMEXT. Join this table to the PAs_Geodatabase using CVEFT then select where NUMEXT = SumTable.NUMEXT_MAX and NUMEXT = SumTable.NUMEXT_MIN to get the maximum and ...


1

Shapefiles still store numbers using 64 bits of precision, 16-16 digits. It looks like you need 11 or 12, so you should not get errors unless you are doing computations in which case floating point errors are a remote possiblility. If anything is ever converted into a 32-bit floating point number you would definitely lose precision.


1

I haven't used .mdb files (not yet anyway!) so I am not sure if the following will work but I believe this is how you can import .mdb files: Layer > Add Vector Layer... > select Database > ESRI Personal GeoDatabase Perhaps then you can do a join...?


1

If you run your script in the Python window of ArcMap with the AAAJ2011-004-02 TH Traditional Territory.mxd open, you should reference your map document as MxD = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument ('current'). If you run it with another mxd open, you should keep your mapDoc variable as it is but add mapDoc.save() in the end of your script.


1

If you need this for labeling purposes only, leave the field as it is and label your features using this expression (with the VBScript parser): round([Test]*100) & "%"



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