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If you have ArcInfo, 3D or Spatial analyst, you can use the create random point tool to generate your points. First I would start with the intersection between your fishnet and a dissolve of your other feature class. This will give you one multipart polygon per grid cell including some of the yellow polygons. Then you can place one point for each of the ...


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From TIGER: ftp://ftp2.census.gov/geo/tiger/TIGER2014/ZCTA5/ This is a shapefile of every ZIP code from the most recent update. You can spatial join your shapefile of points to the shapefile of ZIP polygons.


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Those coordinate differences are measured in Angstroms. File geodatabase uses a technique similar to the integer storage representation conversion in enterprise geodatabases (ArcSDE) to snap 64-bit floating-point coordinate values to a feature class coordinate resolution grid. This coordinate resolution is established at feature class creation (and it's ...


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I have figured this one out. I ended up using the NeighborFinder as I initially suspected. The trick is to store all candidate details in a list (I called it NeighbourList). I then connected that to a ListExploder to create features from all elements in the list. Then I used a tester to filter out the features with a distance of zero. Finally, I used ...


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These two comparable tools exist because ESRI has multiple license levels. Point to Raster (Conversion) is only available with the Advanced license. Feature to Raster (Conversion) is available with all of the license levels. Point to Raster allows you much more control over how multiple points are handled when multiple points fall within a raster cell. ...


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There is definitely something wrong with your shapefile - viewing it in QGIS, the extents are: -85.489443389,0.000406358 : -85.489443375,0.000406369 ... placing it somewhere off the coast of Equador. Another clue: the difference in X extents (-85.489443389 - -85.489443375) is 0.000000014 decimal degrees - which makes the whole cemetary something around ...


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This use case should be covered by the Relations feature: see User Manual - Creating one to many relations or Matthias Kuhn's QGIS Relations post.


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I think what happened is that the original data is in lat/lon. Somehow it was assigned the UTM coordinate reference system, and unprojected to WGS 1984, a geographic coordinate reference system. Having "Y" or latitude values near zero that should be at mid-latitudes is a classic sign of a mistaken UTM definition for latitude/longitude data. I don't know ...



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