Hot answers tagged

4

One possible solution is to use St_ClusterWithin. This creates geometry collections of all the geometries that are within a distince, d, of each other, and takes the form ST_ClusterWithin(geom, d). Start by using ST_ClusterWithin. Wrap this function in unnest and ST_CollectionExtract which takes a GeometryCollection and a number, in this case 1, points, ...


3

Point sampling tool works perfectly if the spatial reference (projection) of the raster data and the point shapefile are same. Working with different projections for the raster(s) and shapefile data will create a shapefile with empty column of raster (Null) values. You need to change the projection of point shapefile to be similar to the raster data to get ...


2

Perhaps the easiest way is using the near tool if you have the license. If you don't have the license then there are ways to code this functionality. Or you can possibly run a buffer of .5 m to create small polygons and then do a spatial join between the buffer and the point layers. Then you can select the points that share the same buffer feature ID.


2

This can be done in Qgis by using "rule based" symbology with two levels of settings. To safe you a bit of work you go to "symbology" - "categories" first and classify your data on the column qualifier that defines your shapes. But donĀ“t set any shapes yet, its just a work in progress step and will be dismissed in the end. Then you go to "rule based". You ...


2

In your case, it is not necessary to create polygon buffers for your points. The raster::extract function has a buffer argument that will do exactly what you are after. library(raster) r <- raster(ncol=36, nrow=18) r[] <- 1:ncell(r) xy <- SpatialPoints(cbind(-50, seq(-80, 80, by=20))) extract(r, xy, buffer=1000000, fun=mean) For future ...


2

I suggest using the Delete Identical Tool. However, the precise application depends on both your data and the purpose of your task. In case your point features share the same location (you want to delete duplicates), use the Delete Identical Tool and select the "Shape" field. In case your point features don't share the same location and you want to ...


1

ST_Dump will do it.... change DESC to ASC to get the other end. This example sorts the geometry by ST_Y: SELECT ST_Astext(geom) FROM ST_Dump('MULTIPOINT(1673118.56314624 5778263.30559826,1672914.41092247 5778129.131443,1672384.7731665 5778105.44570288,1673513.70724225 5778525.74090022)') Order By ST_Y(geom) DESC Limit 1 Or this example filters by path #:...


1

What exactly are you wanting to compare? A point pattern is a representation of an explicit spatial process that is significant from a spatial random assumption. A raster does not meet the same criteria of a point process. You can test the similarity of values but, this does not at all demonstrate the equivalency of an underlying spatial process. Think of ...


1

I can't comment because of status credits, but in response to You could just calculate and export the centroid of the polygon/building footprint to give you one point. It is to be weary that centroids don't necessarily fall within polygons (buildings), such as polygons with donuts (in your instance a building with an atrium). http://support.esri....


1

You could just calculate and export the centroid of the polygon/building footprint to give you one point.


1

You can create a 0.5m buffer zone and then use the select by location tool (top toolbar under Selection). At the target layer you select the buffer and at the source layer prompt the other layer. At the spatial selection method you can select "are within the source layer feature".


1

You can convert these points to raster by FeatureToRaster and set cell size to grid width, Then use RasteToPolygon convert raster to grid polygon.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible