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5

I think that your issue is only a "Zoom In" problem. I'm going to render to tif these random points with Raster-> Conversion -> Rasterize (Vector to Raster) Tool (cell resolution 30 x 30) of QGIS; equivalent to your standalone Python script. Loaded raster layer looks as if no point had been rasterized. However, with point layer as first layer, 'Zoom In'...


5

As GDAL supports writing to X,Y,Z (CSV) ascii, you could use gdal_translate: gdal_translate -of xyz -co ADD_HEADER_LINE=YES -co COLUMN_SEPARATOR="," input_raster output.csv To avoid writing NoData values to your output you can write the output to stdout then pipe to grep/findstr to filter it before writing to your csv: gdal_translate -q -of xyz -co ...


3

This would not be fire frequency because, if it is point data, it would either be an ignition event or an area (polygon) generalized into a point location. Thus it would aptly be ignition frequency or a misrepresentation of a fire process. Inherently, fires occur across space and as such are associated with area and not discrete point location(s). Sorry ...


3

So are you wanting to add to the existing features? If so, have a look at the Append tool. It will keep the original features and continue to add to them. Note that the features should have the same schema.


3

I do not know of a way to do so directly. If you only a few points, enter to editor, start editing, click "Create Features", select point, then right click on the map and select "Absolute XY". You can then input the coordinates, hit enter, and it will create the point location. You can then enter the table and input other attributes. If you have a lot ...


2

Unfortunately ArcMap doesn't work the way you describe. To create points using X/Y values you probably have three options: Create another table in your File Geodatabase (including the XY column) and populate that table with the records you want to add, then you can use the Add from X/Y function to create a new events layer. This could also be done from ...


2

R would be a good place to do this, if you're willing to copy a little code. I think in general you are looking for a raster function, essentially. If you need it as a polygon, you can convert the raster to polygon when you're finished. library(rgdal) library(raster) library(plyr) # load your points points <- readOGR("points.shp", "points") # create a ...


1

You can identify these two locations using Google Maps, just by entering the coordinates like (56.53515, -111.53155) and (54.13513, -112.41244) These show as being in Alberta Canada (the two stars in the map below). Moving between the two may be slow at 1.3m/s as the distance between the two is about 275km


1

Because a raster is continuous and points are discrete, you will need to use an interpolation method to create the kind of raster you would like. There are several different interpolation methods that may be better or worse for a specific application - but, here is a pretty brief overview of interpolation: http://pro.arcgis.com/en/pro-app/tool-reference/3d-...


1

If I get you correctly, You need to use the below steps- Use point to raster, it will give you a raster of points but blank where no points(i.e. NoData area rendered with nocolor)- maintain same pixel size with layer 2 e.g. 5*5 To get the background, convert polygon of UK into raster after setting the value for this layer 0- maintain same pixel size with ...


1

In case there are those who may run into the same issue, here is my solution (that works beautifully!) from qgis.core import * from qgis.gui import * from PyQt4.QtCore import * source_dir = '/home/cassandra/desktop/file_formats/ENC_ROOT/US6SP10M/shapefiles/SOUNDG.shp' name = 'SOUNDG' output_dir = '/home/cassandra/desktop/file_formats/ENC_ROOT/US6SP10M/...


1

If you want to take advantage of ST_DWithin, you'll need to specify a cutoff radius to limit the expansion of clusters. (It's possible to have a set of inputs where a user's cluster is the entire table). Say we have a user at (-80, 40), and we want to limit the search radius to 15km. That can be done with this modification: SELECT row_number() over () ...


1

Try this way with GDAL: import os, sys from osgeo import gdal from osgeo import gdalconst # get the arguments InRaster = sys.argv[1] OutCSV = sys.argv[2] # open the raster and get some properties ds = gdal.OpenShared(InRaster,gdalconst.GA_ReadOnly) GeoTrans = ds.GetGeoTransform() ColRange = range(ds.RasterXSize) RowRange = range(ds.RasterYSize) ...


1

ST_Dump will do it.... change DESC to ASC to get the other end. This example sorts the geometry by ST_Y: SELECT ST_Astext(geom) FROM ST_Dump('MULTIPOINT(1673118.56314624 5778263.30559826,1672914.41092247 5778129.131443,1672384.7731665 5778105.44570288,1673513.70724225 5778525.74090022)') Order By ST_Y(geom) DESC Limit 1 Or this example filters by path #:...


1

What exactly are you wanting to compare? A point pattern is a representation of an explicit spatial process that is significant from a spatial random assumption. A raster does not meet the same criteria of a point process. You can test the similarity of values but, this does not at all demonstrate the equivalency of an underlying spatial process. Think of ...



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