New answers tagged

1

What kind of arrows do you want to display? I have just created a Leaflet plugin which shows the direction and the speed of wind. So if per chance you would like to show wind data, you can use my plugin: https://github.com/JoranBeaufort/Leaflet.windbarb Otherwise there is the marker rotate plugin: ...


0

So the reference work for understanding what has happened here is Understanding Coordinate Management in the Geodatabase (unfortunately, Esri broke their website this weekend, so I can't link to their site at this moment). Essentially, the fact that "projections match" is of no consequence, because a coordinate reference in ArcGIS encompasses more than just ...


3

The "same location" part of your question is problematic, since locations are stored as floating point values, and due to computer operating system rounding errors you will get two points that you consider at the same location with very slightly different X,Y. The correct way to do this is to define a buffer distance within which you consider two points as ...


1

To answer my own questions (as far as I can tell) No: The random point generator does have the same feature as the buffer tool. It cannot accept text Yes: the units random point minimum distance uses are the map units. I was wrong about this (idiot -- can I downvote myself? I can't). One needs to be aware of the map units and convert appropriately


5

One method is to use a virtual field which would automatically number your points using the $id expression (or whatever expression you prefer): Note that you will need to save a project file for this as virtual fields are saved in the .qgs file and not in the shapefile itself (but you can re-save the shapefile as a new one using the Save As... option ...


3

I think you talk about the id of shapefiles, if so you can go to layer properties (doubleclick the layer) then go to fields and set the item that is called 'Bearbeitungselement' in german to UUID-Generator (id field type must be text) as shown in the screenshot below (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universally_unique_identifier). When digitizing your ...


0

You have to treat the @data slot (the data frame) a bit differently to reduce the number of attributes / columns: Set the working directory and load the right library require(rgdal) setwd("~/workspace/TEMP/") Make a fake SPDF to work with, as OP describes pts <- data.frame(x=1:5, y=1:5, A = 1:5, B = 1, C = 2, D = 3) coordinates(pts) <- ~x+y ...


2

Here are a few links to get you started in the right direction. This is not simple Euclidean geometry question. See Charles F. F. Kinney's (cffk's) response to Finding projection of point to line? The C code Charles mentions is at this link to his intersect.ccp file His very detailed article entitled Algorithms for geodesics deals with math behind the ...


0

I think you need to subset your dataset using bracket notation. As an example: point_pattern <- point_pattern[point_pattern$A == 1,]


1

See https://github.com/bbecquet/Leaflet.RotatedMarker. Alternatively, use a L.DivIcon and apply CSS transforms to its contents.


3

You may need to use a custom script in your modeler to delete selected features. You can create one via: Processing Toolbox > Scripts > Tools > Create new script Then use something like the following: ##Example=name ##Layer=vector layer = processing.getObject(Layer) ids = [f.id() for f in layer.selectedFeatures()] ...


1

Very frustrating to say the least... This makes me want to go back to an earlier version of ArcGIS when this issue was not an occurrence (10.1). I knew this was an issue in ~10.2 and I thought it was resolved in 10.3; however, for the first time I am receiving duplicates when I run this tool. I have the basic license so I cannot use the delete identical tool ...


3

I can suggest a two-step process, which will randomize any number of points inside each census tract: First, perform a Points in Polygon Analysis. You will find this tool in Vector > Analysis Tools > Points in Polygon. This will add a new field in your census tracts layer with the number of points inside each tract. Create random points inside your ...


1

Think this would be a 2 process thing (in Arc anyways). Create an event theme (or run Make XY Event Layer) and then use the z and m values from the attribute fields in the resulting feature to populate the geometry values. I would do something in Python, but you could run "Feature To 3D By Attribute". I'm not sure what an m value represents in your point ...


0

When using the Point to Line script tool, be sure to first add the following fields if you don't already have something similar set up: Segment (or similarly named): to identify each segment; and Order_ (or similarly named - don't use "Order" as this is a reserved word): to count, in order, the points pertaining to a segment. Make both fields text with max ...


2

The answer is right in your explain results. When you put the index on the polygons, the planner thinks: "aha, I can do a nested loop on the points and quickly get each polygon that is of interest for the points". This ends up being wrong, probably because you (a) have more points than polygons and (b) evaluating the index condition is only the cheapest ...


1

I like the answers given above, but if converting each grid cell to a polygon is too time consuming then point density may be the all-raster alternative.


5

Spatial Join your points to your polygons, use INTERSECT or WITHIN, no need to keep all the attributes just the OID of the polygon is what's needed on the joined points. Using summary statistics you can count the points.. use a summary field of FID or OBJECTID depending on what sort of data you have (shape or GDB), summary type of count and a case field of ...


4

Probably the easiest way to do this is with a Spatial Join. Provided you have a polygon layer as your grid as opposed to lines... There are a couple of ways to perform a spatial join in ArcGIS. If you use the Spatial Join tool, you can set your target features to the polygon layer. Then your join features are the points. You'll automatically get a new ...


2

There is another method that you can do : Before you do, Make a backup of your layer in case if it becomes corrupt. You should be able to do the following: If you are doing a few then do this: Start Editing. Click on the Attributes Use the "Edit Tool " Drag over all of the points or a point. On the Attributes, See if there are two overlaps. If you see two ...


9

Super easy manual process. You use the tool Select by Location. Select points in B that match A Export your selection in B to a new layer C "Switch" the selection in B. You now have selected all the points in B that are not in A. You can Append the selection in B to the layer C. You then do the opposite; Select points in A that match B. "Switch" the ...


2

You can do a Selection by Location. If the points are in the exact same spot, setting your tolerance to zero would only give you results on top of each other. If they are approximate, you will need to adjust that tolerance to figure out which ones are duplicates. You can then either delete the duplicates and use that layer or take the unique points from each ...


1

Problem was that the raster was the output of the "zonal statistics tool", where I used a 5x5km vector grid as reference. I thought the raster was automatically resampled at 5x5km pixel size, but it was not. Basically it was 30x30m pixel size and this is why I got such a huge amount of points.


0

That is only partly supported. By the documentation of MapServer 7.0.1 http://mapserver.org/mapfile/style.html#style your HEIGHT is supported with a keyword "SIZE". Angle is supported as "ANGLE". But your LENGTH (width) is not supported. Instead the width of the symbol is scaled by the same factor as SIZE. Here are my test mapfile and the rendered result. ...



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