Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Using your code: private IPolygon BoundingPolygon() { try { IGeometryBridge2 pGeoBrg = new GeometryEnvironment() as IGeometryBridge2; IPointCollection4 pPointColl = new MultipointClass(); // edited here int numPoints = pList.Count; WKSPoint[] aWKSPointBuffer = new WKSPoint[numPoints]; for (int i = 0; i < ...


-1

Use the Coordinate Reference System (CRS) of the raster image.


0

This may be easier if you think of it in separate steps: first calculate the quantitative density, then reclassify that result into "high" and "low." The Point Density tool inputs will be: Input point features: your outfall points Population field: Use NONE for this, because each point is being counted once. (If a point could represent multiple instances, ...


0

I think Point Density makes the most sense. I'd set the population field to "NONE" since you seem to want each point to count as one. The output will be a raster. I think this is pretty much the same thing as suggested above by tugboat789.


3

If you have access to the 3D Analyst extension, this can be accomplished using the TIN Node tool found here: 3D Analyst Tools - Conversion - From TIN - TIN Node. This will create 3D points (i.e Z-enabled) at each triangle node that forms the TIN. Alternatively you could convert your TIN to a raster, and then use the Raster to Multipoint tool which will ...


1

You could use the Distance to nearest hub algorithm from the Processing plugin which you could add your points and your lines layer instead of going through a query. From a couple of example layers that I have, you can get something like this: Then when you open up the Attributes Table for the output layer, you will be given the HubName and HubDist in ...


4

For general centroid creation, QGIS QgsGeometry functions wrap respective calls to the underlying GEOS library: QgsGeometry * QgsGeometry::centroid() (definition) calls GEOSGetCentroid (definition) QgsGeometry * QgsGeometry::pointOnSurface() (definition) calls GEOSPointOnSurface (definition) The pointOnSurface() function is new for QGIS 2.4 and allows a ...


0

Centroid computation in Qgis are based on the GEOS library. I can then refer you to the the documentation of GEOS itself (http://geos.osgeo.org/doxygen/classgeos_1_1algorithm_1_1Centroid.html) where you can find the basic principle for polygon centroid computation: Based on the usual algorithm for calculating the centroid as a weighted sum of the ...


2

You can also visualize this by clicking your line symbology in the Table of Contents. Under the Esri line styles, select the symbology called "Arrow at End" and this will show you the directionality of the line.


1

If your goal is to SEE where the line ends, you can also add an arrow symbol at the end of your line. (layer properties > symbology >symbol properties > cartographic line symbol > line properties). Otherwise, for a non programmatic solution, you can compute the X and Y coordinates of the end point based on "calculate geometry"(right click on field), then ...


0

if you are snapping the B towards the A, you could create 5 m buffers around each A's, then you use snap with a tolerance of 60 meters.


4

To do this I would use the Intersect (Analysis) tool. The ArcPy code will be: import arcpy homesFC = <your path to input Homes> districtsFC = <your path to input Districts> homesWithDistrictFC = <your path to output> arcpy.Intersect_analysis ([homesFC, districtsFC], homesWithDistrictFC)


1

This looks familiar! The issue you're having is that the result of cent is a multipoint geometry instead of just a point geometry- even though the result of the intersect IS a single point. I'm not sure if a multipoint is always returned or what. You might try something like this: T2B = arcpy.Array([arcpy.Point(1,2),arcpy.Point(-1, -2)]) L2R = ...


3

For the Points that fall within the 65 meter radius, can't you just subtract 5 meters from A's Y coordinate and use A's X coordinate to find a Point at the 5 meter position? You can use the DA cursor to update these Point's Geometry to the 5m position.


0

If you're not limiting yourself to an arcpy solution, what you're describing sounds like fairly common practice with ArcObjects - there is a 'Buffer Snap Agent' sample here: Buffer snap agent http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/arcobjects-net/conceptualhelp/index.html#/d/000100000334000000.htm I haven't tested it but was interested in the VB.NET logic - ...


1

How about this for an idea. If B is within the specified distance of A then create a polyline between A and B. You can then create a point any distance along that polyline. Polyline object has a method positionalongline.



Top 50 recent answers are included