New answers tagged

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Point on point isn't going to work, even if the coordinates are exact match, it's a 50/50 whether the feature class point will be selected by the query point. To overcome this I always buffer the point by a very small amount - this depends on your spatial reference, 1 metre (or foot) usually isn't very much but 1 degree usually is a very large number, you'll ...


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You may use the Intersect tool and define POINT as output type. Computes a geometric intersection of the input features. Features or portions of features which overlap in all layers and/or feature classes will be written to the output feature class. output type: POINT - Point intersections will be returned. If the inputs are line or polygon, ...


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Perhaps you could to use coordinate X and Y from the group of point to obtain x min, x max, y min and y max and then you could obtain X and Y from the center and the radius or diameter. Obviously, you'll obtain 2 data, X and Y, you should to choose the more interesting from your work, mínimun, mean, maximum... In this way to obtain the circle and the ...


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If your projection of your points are the same as the raster then you can just pull the proj4string slot from the raster and assign it to the raster. Reading the data, coercing the csv to a SpatialPointsDataFrame and assigning the projection from the raster, would look something like this (not tested): library(sp) library(raster) r <- ...


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I think this is done using the WikiProject Geographical coordinates: WikiProject Geographical coordinates aims to better organize location information in articles containing a set of numbers that identifies location on and relative to the Earth.


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The most likely answer is axis order - if you check the DirectPosition2D API docs you will see the following warning: This class inherits x and y fields. But despite their names, they don't need to be oriented toward East and North. The (x,y) axis can have any orientation and should be understood as "ordinate 0" and "ordinate 1" values instead. ...


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The points appear as billboards by default. You can change them to points with the following code: var entities = dataSource.entities.values; for (var i = 0; i < entities.length; i++) { var entity = entities[i]; entity.billboard = undefined; entity.point = new Cesium.PointGraphics({ color: Cesium.Color.fromRandom(), ...


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Try to do the following to see if the problem still exist: 1- When you add point to the map, keep the point selected and open the attribute table 2- Update the x-coordinate field with $x and y-coordinate field with $y, so that you will get the x and y coordinates of the newly added points. 3- Save the attribute table. 4-Repeat the above process after ...


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Linear referencing is the way to go for this problem. If the Route measures are based on the length of the line then all you need is a table that contains the Route Name, the distance along the line increasing from the end where you start your measures, and a distance offset. By using the Make Route Event Layer tool or table context menu option you can ...


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Have a look on the link given below.Maybe it can work for you: http://blog.rtwilson.com/how-to-snap-points-to-lines-in-arcgis-with-python/


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Should be possible. As you mention python i guess you have some knowledge there. The idea would be to read your point coordinates. Then create the shape of your desired buffer. You can build a loop for creating a shape for each point and within this loop you move your polygons to the coordinates of your points(as you have always the same shape it is easy to ...


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My results are different from yours. I used two fields called Points (Number of Points Field) and Distance (Minimum Allowed Distance Field) depending on container polygon size to create random points. I computed two other fields called FREQ and mDist. First stores number of points produced per polygon, second shows minimum distance to other points within ...


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I just ran "Random Points", using numeric fields for Max Points and Minimum Distance. My Data, values and DataFrame are all in Meters. I have Points, inside the same Polygon, that are closer than the Minimum Distance. I'm seeing the same results as @woot, very strange.


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As an afterthought, another way of achieving this is manually adding a row in edit mode, copying the attribute data from the point feature to the new row, and then deleting the original point feature. It's crude, and time consuming, but hey, it works.


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Calculate the min/max values for X/Y using the field calculator or similar for respective new fields: XMin XMax YMin YMax Using a these functions: !shape.Extent.Xmin! !shape.Extent.Xmax! !shape.Extent.Ymin! !shape.Extent.Ymax! Then calculate the centerpoint using: Xcenter = ((XMin + XMax) / 2) Ycenter = ((YMin + YMax) / 2) The best would of ...


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I can see two ways to do this. After following your steps, you can edit the fishnet Feature Class. After Start Editing select all features from the fishnet and Move (Editor toolbar, dropdown menu) them. For X and Y you should set the half of cell size. The numbers should be positive or negative depending on the direction you have to move the grid. While ...


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Here is an even easier alternative to setting all geometries to NULL. For this to work you need to be in edit mode if you are processing a GeoDatabase FeatureClass. This example shows how to set polygons to NULL For a point dataset the expression needs to be: arcpy.Point() For a polyline dataset the expression needs to be: ...


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You can write an update cursor that replaces the shape field with NULLS. The following ArcPy works for a point geodatabase feature class at 10.3.1. import arcpy FC = "C:\\Data\\GIS\\My.gdb\\AreaOfInterest" newPnt = arcpy.Point() fieldList = arcpy.ListFields(FC,"","Geometry") for field in fieldList: print field.name cursor = arcpy.UpdateCursor(FC) ...


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This is possible with QGIS without extra plugins using the Advanced Digitizing panel. This tool allows entering exact coordinate values as well as constructing points at given distance and angle from other points. Pictures taken from this excellent answer which gives a walkthrough.


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Another option is to use QGIS's virtual layer functionality. Just click the 'Add Virtual Layer' icon near the bottom of the left hand tool bar and enter the following into the query window (subbing your values for the parameters in the MakePoint function): SELECT 1 as id, MakePoint(x, y, srid) as geom If you want to create multiple points this syntax ...


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I would enclose the area in the above picture. In other words make a single polygon surrounding the points. Determine the area of the polygon. Then get a total point count within the area (all colors combined) I would then get a point count for each of the separate colors within that area. Find the percentages of each of the colors from the total point ...


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If the points are regular points having the same distance between each point, you can convert the points to raster instead of polygons. But you need to select the proper cell size, simply by measuring the distance among the points. Then you can Go Raster -> Conversion -> Rasterize. Set a vector layer to process, a field with values and desired raster ...



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