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For that kind of dataset I would argue that would be un-wise and try to reproject-on-the-fly. It can be done with ST_Transform(rast), but if you want to go that road be sure to include spatial extents (rast type can be casted to geom type). As aerial images are mostly for viewing I would suggest to consider using an intermediate step by using a ...


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Connected to my database world_borders, I did (the first and the last point must be equal): CREATE TABLE geometries (name varchar, geom geometry); INSERT INTO geometries VALUES ('Polygon', 'POLYGON((50.488453280451964 30.816523649043251, 50.227886556627098 31.15709614260982, 50.227886335531331 31.157096406770776, 50.227468173402542 31.157506958998855, ...


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osm2pgsql is surely designed to import the whole planet into postgis. You have to make sure to use a recent version of osm2pgsql, because the node numbers in OSM have hit a limit which made it necessary to change the number format from integer to long integer. Older versions of osm2pgsql will fail therefore. On windows, there are a few more pitfalls. You ...


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Maybe osmosis is the option you are looking for. You can use osmosis to import all tags into the postgis database. Since osmosis does not build GIS ready to use objects you must do this in a separate process using SQL. A very good collection to start with are the osmosis layers from moenk available on github.


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This is a case sensitivity/quoting issue. "PointsForGpxExport" and PointsForGpxExport are not the same table name. PostgreSQL, per the SQL standard, case-folds unquoted identifiers. (It case-folds to lowercase, where the standard says uppercase, though). So when you write PointsForGpxExport, PostgreSQL treats that as the same as pointsforgpxexport. Since ...



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