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11

The highest elevation within 10 km is the neighborhood maximum value computed with a circular 10 km radius, so just extract a profile of this neighborhood maximum grid along the trajectory. Example Here is a hillshaded DEM with a trajectory (black line running from bottom to top): This image is approximately 17 by 10 kilometers. I chose a radius of ...


10

Following on from the comments, here's a version that works with perpendicular line segments. Please use with caution as I haven't tested it thoroughly! This method is much more clunky than @whuber's answer - partly because I'm not a very good programmer, and partly because the vector processing is a bit of a faff. I hope it'll at least get you started if ...


5

I had the same problem and tried James S' solution, but couldn't get the GDAL to work with Fiona. Then I discovered the SAGA algorithm "Cross Profiles" in QGIS 2.4, and got exactly the result I wanted and that I presume you are looking for too (see below).


4

Download and use a plugin called "Profile tool". load your grid load your polyline (layer) run plugin (Plugins/Profile tool/ Terrain profile) in field called "Selection" (below the profile chart) choose "Selected polyline" and choose your line To simply get all grid values along the line switch tab from "Profile" to "Table" and there you can copy all ...


3

The "Add layer" button is only for the raster layers. To get the profile for a certain line: activate the line layer (= highlight it in the layer list) activate the profile tool (in the toolbar) click on the line feature on the map


2

Please look for existing answers prior to asking a question. You can find all the answers and tools for QGIS and GRASS in this existing thread EDIT: But still need a Height Profile? Google Earth maybe has something like this and is also available for Unix/Windows and co.


2

If you want to duplicate the functionality of the Google Elevation service using your own data, you might want to consider using GDAL. I wrote just such a service and it is very fast. I wrote mine using the C# implementation of GDAL. I had never used GDAL before, but with the sample code provided with the library, it didn't take me very long to figure it ...


2

If I understood the question right, take a look at r3.cross.rast which creates cross section 2D raster map from 3D raster map based on 2D elevation map. From that 2D map you can generate the area report.


2

I have committed changes in the repository that implement the axis. Use this code to install the latest development version: ## install.packages("devtools") devtools::install_github("rastervis", "oscarperpinan") Then, use the new argument axis.margin to enable the axis. f <- system.file("external/test.grd", package="raster") r <- raster(f) ...


2

It is handled by an esri geoprocessing service, which it is recommended that you update from the old service. The details page mentions plenty of good reference information.


2

Vince's comment partially answers your problem - your data is in degrees, so the x axis or length is also going to be displayed in degrees rather than meters. However I think you're also confusing what Profile Sampling actually does. It will not change the values or labels of your x axis - that's the length of your line in whatever units of measure your CRS ...


2

MapQuest has an Elevation Service API you can use (for free). All you need is an API Key. I recommend creating your own graph as their default one is not very aesthetically pleasing.


1

The plotting library used to generate the graph is matplotlib. Check your OSGeo4W advanced install section "libs" if matplotlib is installed.


1

Please update to the latest GRASS GIS 6 version which should address this problem: http://trac.osgeo.org/grass/wiki/Release/6.4.3-News


1

You can use the Official Example https://google-developers.appspot.com/maps/documentation/javascript/examples/elevation-paths The Code is well documented so should be easy (with javascript knowledge) to use your own paths to calculate values. Takes an array of ElevationResult objects, draws the path on the map and plots the elevation profile on a ...


1

I have run into this issue in the past, and needed a concrete answer as I was required to document the methodology behind the profile generation for a client. I had found that using an existing shapefile to generate the profile data resulted in highly variable distances between given elevation points, and that when using an interpolated shape (3D analyst - ...



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