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7

If you have the XY of the point, then you could create a PointGeometry. current_sr = arcpy.SpatialReference(102726) #Enter the current WKID for the point new_sr = arcpy.SpatialReference(4326) #This is the WKID for WGS84 point = arcpy.PointGeometry(arcpy.Point(7334719, 670307), current_sr) new_point = point.projectAs(new_sr) >>> ...


3

just to venture a guess - was the shapefile projected to the new coordinate system or re-defined as a new coordinate system? (i'll assume ArcGIS was used) it almost sounds like define projection was used, which will not actually modify the geometry of the polygons - it simply tells GIS that the polygons are in a given projection. Thus, if a poly spans from ...


3

You might get a shift if the source CRS of the original shapefile is not given by an EPSG code, but a .prj file. These do not include datum sift parameters, and gdal tries to match the WKT information with its own EPSG database. So I suggest to always add the -s_srs parameter for all ogr2ogr operations.


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Proposal: Conic Equidistant Projection This preserves distance over all meridians and two parallels of choice (could be optimized for major areas of interest). Notice, most distance distortion is in the southern oceans out of the area of interest. As an alternative, you could divide the world into 5 identical projections centered on each continent. This ...


3

Yes. Double-click the dataframe name in the Table of Contents, or right-click it and choose Properties. On the Coordinate System tab, at the bottom, click the Transformations button. This will bring up the same dialog as when you add the layers. Here you can select the CRS of the layers present in the top box, the CRS you want to specify them to (your ...


2

It seems the first dataset (vista_nicosia_links.shp) is using a different projection, most likely UTM (the zone depending on your data's location - for Nicosia, it is most likely UTM Zone 36 North). To match the coordinates properly, you have to correctly determine and define the shapefile's coordinate system (using Define Projection or changing the ...


2

Either the WGS 1984 in the original raster, or in the target UTM doesn't match Esri's definition of WGS 1984. It's probably one of the names. If it's the original raster, try using the Define Projection tool to reset it to Esri's WGS 1984 definition. If it's the output coordinate system, try using Esri's version instead.


2

The shapefile distributed by GeoDa Center does not have a PRJ file, so normally you would have to define the projection in order to line it up with other spatial data. But it appears that while the shapefile distributed by GeoDa Center does in fact use the UTM 19N zone, for some reason the units are in kilometers, where UTM coordinates are usually expressed ...


2

See my solution for QGIS: Export your projects to shape, and load them to qgis. If you want to use meter for your buffer distances, you have to transform your layer to meter coordinate system. The Best would be the local (country-national) coordinate systems. So save as your layers again to shape but in the CRS section choose selected CRS and load your new ...


2

Unless you really need ~millimeter accuracy you do not need a custom local system. Just use the appropriate UTM zone. UTM is metric and projected, so you will get proper distances. You can find some examples for calculating the distortion from going away from the central meridian of an UTM zone. You can keep your source data as WGS84 but be aware that at ...


1

I guess your data have lat/long coordinates ("Geographic coordinate systems" in ArcGis), so that coordinates are stored in degrees (e.g. decimal degrees). For this kind of analysis I think the use of a "Projected coordinate systems" is recommended. You can refer to the following image (Wikipedia) to find the UTM zone where your project data belongs: ...


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i faced somehow the same problem. For me that worked. instead of EPSG:4326 in my project i used EPSG:28993. mapOptions = {projection:"EPSG:900913",displayProjection: new OpenLayers.Projection("EPSG:4326")}; map = new OpenLayers.Map(mapOptions); googleBaseMap = new OpenLayers.Layer.Google("Google Satellite", {'type' : google.maps.MapTypeId.HYBRID}); ...


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The significance of the number 998999 is that it is 1 less than 999000. It actually serves as the upper bound 'custom' user SRIDs. The range of SRIDs reserved for user custom SRIDs is from 910000 to 998999. It took me a while, but I dug this up as reference: http://lists.osgeo.org/pipermail/postgis-users/2012-July/034716.html In terms of your comment ...



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