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It indeed depends on how the area grid has been created. It has to be done with the Vincenty's formalae for the highest precision (<0.5% errors). If the Haversine equation was used (<2.5% error), then you would probably have more accurate results with an equal area projection. However, the problem with projections is that you loose some information ...


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It looks like the first image is using the WSG84 geodetic reference system, whereas the second image is using GRS80, which is why is looks curved. This suggests the objects haven't been converted to the same CRS. Can you provide the climate data, or a sample, so I or another user can look into this further?


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When you change the projection via the properties dialog, I don't believe you are re-projecting the data, you are asserting that the data is actually in the projection you are setting it to. That's why it's all screwed up when you try to use it. You need to use the "Project" tool in the Arc Toolbox. It's all explained here. Even though the article refers to ...


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I have run into the same problem using QGIS today. Whilst I appreciate that it's late to answer I thought this might help. My KML (WGS84) layers, which were exported from an OSGB (ESPG:27700) Shapefile were all offset to WSW by 3 - 5 Metres. I managed to work around this by exporting to GeoJSON (WGS84) and then exporting the GeoJSON layer to KML format. ...


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For those in South Africa battling with unprojected shp file not displaying in Google Earth well once saved as kml from QGIS, try this: Change the CRS of shp file in QGIS to South African CRS : HBK_NO_31, and then re-save as kml It worked for me!


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I think you used the Define Projection Tool or the shapefile's property page (in ArcCatalog) to change the coordinate system to Asia Lambert conformal conic. That updated the metadata but didn't change the data's coordinate values. Redefine it as WGS 1984. Use the Project Tool to make a copy. However, don't use Asia Lambert conformal conic, use Asia Albers ...


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I just entered the coordinates into Google maps. If you change them to 35.205357, -111.59330 it puts you in the Flagstaff area. So The coordinates may have just had their decimal places in the wrong places or missing.


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The latitude value could be 35 20 53.57 while the longitude value could be -111 59 33. Or they could both be decimal degrees, with the appropriate insertion or change of position.


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Use spTransform to transform the coordinates to WGS84: library("rgdal") library("rgeos") map <- readOGR(".", "kommuner1983") map_wgs84 <- spTransform(map, CRS("+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84")) plot(map_wgs84, axes=TRUE) gCentroid(map_wgs84) # SpatialPoints: # x y # 1 10.05 55.96 # Coordinate Reference System (CRS) arguments: +proj=longlat ...


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You should specify the software you are using when asking this type of question. Based on other questions I gather you are using ArcGIS, which is capable of on-the-fly reprojection. This means it will automatically reproject data to the coordinate system (CRS) of the dataframe (which either you set or is set to that of the first layer you add with a defined ...


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It can be done using python netCDF4, Projection4 library pyproj and numpy. Provided knowing the netcdf file CRS and tilted earth CRS, if EPSG codes are available it is super easy. The steps are First import netcdf file into python using netCDF4 library. Query the lat, long of netcdf file and store it as array. Define the current netcdf file CRS and ...


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Below is a work around method using python and bunch of libraries such as netCDF4, numpy and shapefile. With Anaconda, these library installations are very much easy. The steps of the method are Import WRF ARW output into python, by python netCDF4 library. Query WRF ARW output variable XLAT, XLONG into numpy array of latitude and longitude using python ...


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WGS84 is a coordinate system, but it's a Geographic coordinate system, which means it's referenced to a sphere (or ellipsoid). Note that it's also a datum, so if the full name you see under the coordinate system properties is WGS84, that's GCS, but you may also see WGS84 as part of a coordinate system name. You want a Projected coordinate system, which is ...



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