Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

The scale option is only needed for "unprojected" rasters with units in degrees. It is the ratio of height units used in the DEM (typically meters) to distance units in degrees. So for Mercator or other projected rasters, you can ignore the scale option, or use the default of 1 (no scale).


2

The part that is going wrong is where you assumed that the coordinates in 3857 are degrees (like -5.8, 41). The units of 3857 are metres. So you're asking for something tiny, off the map (near the origin). Lets look at a conversion, using pyproj: from pyproj import Proj, transform inProj = Proj(init='epsg:4326') outProj = Proj(init='epsg:3857') x1,y1 = ...


0

Now that I have significantly more R experience under my belt, it's time to answer this question... First was to make sure the geocoded address was converted to a spatialpoint cleaner: AddressDetail <- geocode(match_address) coordinates(AddressDetail) <- ~lon + lat Then the relevant projection was assigned to the spatialpoint wgs84 <- ...


3

You need to apply the geographic transformation too. In the 10.2.5 API, project has several versions. You're going to have to switch to one that uses a Geometry and supports a GeographicTransformation instead like: public static Geometry project (Geometry geometry, SpatialReference inputSR, SpatialReference outputSR, GeographicTransformation tx) For the ...


0

Ok, it turns out that OpenLayers 2.x can't see the proj4.js I'd downloaded (from here) ... So, I downloaded pro4js.js v1.1.0 (note the extra 'js') from here: http://trac.osgeo.org/proj4js/wiki/Download Then I did this after including the lib: Proj4js.defs["EPSG:3009"] = "+proj=tmerc +lat_0=0 +lon_0=15 +k=1 +x_0=150000 +y_0=0 +ellps=GRS80 ...


0

I am not totally sure if I understand what you want to do. But when calling writeFeatures on a format, you can specify the dataProjection (the projection you want to have in your output format) and the featureProjection (the projection of your features that you want to export). See ol.format.GeoJSON.writeFeatures. So for example if your features are in ...


0

You do accomplish your goal with projection, but the "making UTM uniform" or "change data to same UTM" is incorrect. A UTM zone is designed to cover a specific area with minimal distortion and that area is smaller than the US. You need a single projection designed to cover the entire US with minimal distortion - there will be more than in a UTM projection, ...


1

If you have to deal with the whole United States, you should use one of the Contiguos projections: ESRI:102003 USA_Contiguous_Albers_Equal_Area_Conic ESRI:102004 USA_Contiguous_Lambert_Conformal_Conic ESRI:102005 USA_Contiguous_Albers_Equal_Area_Conic You can reproject your UTM data to one of those CRS, then combine them.


1

Here's a working script. I started from the modelbuilder code for reprojecting a single raster, and incrementally changed inputs to variables testing at each step. Seemingly the only difference between the working script below and my previous non-functioning script is that the variables are defined within the body of the for loop. I've also added some ...


0

Try passing cell size as one dimension. like: CellSize = "30" Otherwise try testing the script without any of the optional parameters and see what happens.


3

I believe the problem might be in your coordinate system definitions -- ref. the Project Raster help page. The coordinate system to which the input raster will be projected. The default value is set based on the Output Coordinate System environment setting. Valid values for this parameter are A file with the ".prj" extension (the prj ...


0

I decided to try some alternative tools to see if I had a problem in my workflow. At the suggestion of one of the commenters above, I instead did the following: I used ogr2ogr to reproject the input shapefile into EPSG:3857. I then used shp2svg to convert the Spherical Mercator shapefile to an SVG. This resulted in an SVG file that rendered properly in ...


2

I have put a projection setting in your source definition and it seems to work: var vS=new ol.source.GeoJSON( ({ "object": data, projection: 'EPSG:3857' }) ); This is the result: http://jsfiddle.net/zzahmbff/3/ Perhaps this resource can help you to see different ways to load vector data: ...


1

The metadata of the netcdf file includes projection information, which can be identified by QGIS as a custom CRS: +proj=lcc +lat_1=50 +lat_2=50 +lat_0=50 +lon_0=-107 +x_0=5632642.22547 +y_0=4612545.65137 +ellps=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0,0,0,0,0 +units=m +no_defs but there is no extent given in projection units, only latlon for the corners. If you run gdalinfo ...


0

A good description on the problem can be found here: http://www.esri-ireland.ie/software/arcgis/free-mapping-software/ig-itm The downloadable zip file contains a ntv2 grid for the datum shift. Official information can be obtained from http://www.osi.ie/Services/GPS-Services/Co-ordinate-Converter.aspx and ...


0

I was able to do this in ArcGIS. I: 1) Defined the spatial reference of the DWG in ArcCatalog. 2) Exported the DWG to a GDB (in ArcCatalog). 3) Opened the annotation in the DWG in ArcMap, and converted to Geodatabase Annotation in the GDB, and deleted the point annotation (created from insertion points) already there. (used 1:1000 scale reference. Not ...


5

The answer is Pyproj. Transforms lists of coordinates in a single call, and since it's a C extension module that uses PROJ.4, the same results as cs2cs but at C speed.


0

I would not be sure about the accuracy of Google Earth aerial photos if it is down to 2.5 foot offset. It might just be a question of not exactly orthogonal photography. What you might need is just an affine transformation to get your photos aligned with theirs.


3

You are correct to use an appropriate projection for computing slope and aspect. The problems occur when reprojecting those results to another coordinate system (such as lat-lon). Two things happen: Grid values must be resampled in order to interpolate them to the new cell centers. Aspects, being circular data, must be specially handled. Otherwise the ...


1

Projecting a raster results in a resampling/alteration of the values in that raster because the size/shape/number of cells are changed. It's basically creating a whole new raster and interpolating the values of the new cells based on how that grid lines up with the source grid. The help file usage notes describe some of the issues involved in detail.


3

Set the scaling and offset when reprojecting to WGS84, e.g.: las2las --a_srs EPSG:26911 --t_srs EPSG:4326 -i file1.las -o output.las --scaling 1e-7 1e-7 0.01 --offset <something close to your data's longitudes>,<something close to your data's latitudes>,0 Explanation You've been caught by a limitation/feature of the las file format. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included