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5

On the page that you linked to, there is a note on the bottom: DATUM: SAD-69/original PROJEÇÃO CARTOGRÁFICA: UTM-22 (-51º) OBS.: Devido ao uso do DATUM SAD-69/original por Curitiba, para converter para SIRGAS-2000, devem-se utilizar os parâmetros locais de transformação de coordenadas descritos abaixo: SAD-69/original(Curitiba) -> ...


4

You first need to decide what distortion properties would you like to control for. That is to say, are you interested in preserving area, distance or shape? There is a decision support tool for selecting projections that is quite user friendly and available for free from Oregon State University (Map Projection Selection Tool). Note that you can select the ...


3

I would recommend a Map Projection Selection tool. There is a handy selection tool from Oregon State University (Map Projection Selection Tool). With this tool you can specify which distortion property is important for your map and select the specific area of interest.


3

According to your edit, you want to create a map (layers, featured services etc) using ArcGis for Desktop, which in turn will be used via the Javascript API in my application This is simply not possible. When you publish a map as MapService, it takes on the projection of the Map. In ArcGIS for Desktop, there is no out of the box way to change the ...


3

I tried this out and had no issues... once the data was re-projected and added to the map, I re-set the map to EPSG:3857, added the Google map via OpenLayers, and the re-projected (and projected on the fly) dataset of yours worked just fine:


3

The map object will take on the projection of the first layer you add to it, in the case of your code, the streets basemap is 102100 (web mercator). You have two options to solve this: Use your own basemap service that is in your 102726 projection so that the points from the web service show up in the correct place. Stick with arcgis online basemaps, ...


2

I believe you need a minimum of 3 points to translate, scale, and rotate. The procedure and open source code for doing this is explained here: http://docs.opencv.org/doc/tutorials/imgproc/imgtrans/warp_affine/warp_affine.html I'm assuming your images are not georeferenced, so it should not matter what your map projection is since the user only has to ...


2

The MTM 1 coordinate system for Newfoundland (my guess) is found in he projected coordinate systems section, national grids then Canada and select your MTM zone. You can project these data into a UTM zone 22 keeping the same NAD83 datum between the systems


2

Since all the other countries seem to match, the problem seems to be with the swisserland data. Check again if u have set the right coordinate system for the layer. If it checks out, its probably a faulty dataset. If u know the offset, you could try to reproject the layer with the qgsaffine plugin. Martin Update on how to use it: -Install the plugin, you ...


2

Standard OSM tiles are in Spherical Mercator (SRID=3857) so it will probably be easiest to build your grid using the same projection. If you use SM, you might store the data at the highest zoom level OSM supports, or at the highest level zoom level you'll permit users to zoom into. If coverage is sparse, use a data structure along the lines of XIndex, ...


2

follow the instructions I gave here How to reproject a vector layer in QGIS? and you are done: before: and after:


2

If the Proj4 string that is stored into the GeoTIFF tags is correct this should be an easy case. Without cropping it would look like ogr2ogr -f "ESRI Shapefile" -s_srs epsg:4326 -t_srs "+proj=lcc +lat_1=47.5 +lat_0=47.5 +lon_0=4 +k_0=1 +x_0=0 +y_0=0 +a=6370000 +b=6370000 +units=m +no_defs" projected_out.shp natural_earth_in.shp For cropping to the ...


1

I suggest that you replace the .prj of your shapefile (same name as the other files ) with the prj from Spatial Reference site, which seems to be correct. The difference in X and Y northing comes from the conversion in feet. Probably this is a rounding problem for the two WKT. PROJCS["NAD83 / California zone 3 ...


1

You can use some projections that are provided by ESRI, depending on whether distance or area is important for you. They look very similar: ESRI:102032 South_America_Equidistant_Conic +proj=eqdc +lat_0=-32 +lon_0=-60 +lat_1=-5 +lat_2=-42 +x_0=0 +y_0=0 +ellps=aust_SA +units=m +no_defs ESRI:102033 South_America_Albers_Equal_Area_Conic +proj=aea ...


1

The value stored in a cell from a heatmap is often normalized by its area. In this case I would rather suggest an equal area projection so that you can easily aggregate to larger scale


1

You can do this using cartopy. #!/usr/bin/env python import cartopy import cartopy.crs as ccrs import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from pylab import imread im = imread('Robinson-projection.jpg') ax = plt.axes(projection=ccrs.Robinson()) plt.imshow(im, origin='upper', extent=[-17005833.330525, 17005833.330525, -8622512.772008, 8622512.772008], ...


1

It's a two-stage solution: project geo-coords (lat, lon) to a Robinson map (N, E) transform the map (N, E) to a screen window (row, col) For stage 1, projection, you can use the ogr2ogr tool. Gothos explains how to use it for Robinson in particular transform-projections-with-gdal-ogr The EPSG library is extensive, but doesn’t contain everything, ...


1

Inverting the transform isn't the way to go. Try the dataset's index() method or its code: https://github.com/mapbox/rasterio/blob/master/rasterio/_io.pyx#L878.


1

Azimuthal Equidistant Projection may work well. The origin of the projection should be set to the Lat/Long of your local area. Angles and distance from the origin are preserved. Depends on how large your 'local' area is. Distortions increase the further distance you go from the origin.


1

I've used this online converter successfully: http://converter.mygeodata.eu/vector



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