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It helps if you cut your EPSG:4326 shapefile at 89.9° North. The points at the 90° North line will all fall into one point (the North pole). That might break the polygon definition after reprojection. In your screenshot, you have swapped input layer and clip layer. Therefore you get only the attributes form the cliplayer (presumably nothing). To check the ...


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It's actually a bug in GeoServer. GeoServer in it's WFS implementation specifies the order of coordinates for different versions and projection definitions (link) but GeoJSON states specifically that the order is always the same (x,y,z or lon,lat,alt). See the spec.


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There's some information on the OGC Call for Comments page on the new specification for coordinate reference system WKT standard. The original specification was written by Esri many moons ago for OGC based on the mid-1990s version of the EPSG Geodetic Parameter Dataset's schema. It was revised and extended by other OGC specifications. Because it was a very ...


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The names you marked are truely free to use, because the relevant data is in the following parameters. The .prj file has to be in WKT format, as explained here: http://www.geoapi.org/3.0/javadoc/org/opengis/referencing/doc-files/WKT.html Those keywords have to be used exactly, but not the names. Every (good) software looks at the parameters, and makes its ...


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These are all for the State Plane zones which are conformal (maintain shape, not area) like UTM. They should be slightly better because they're defined for a small area than a UTM zone is. Even better, but still conformal, would be the county-level Minnesota coordinate reference systems. Instead using an equal area projection like Albers and customizing ...


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The .prj file is definitely wrong, it should contain a WKT definition. It looks rather like a mapinfo projection definition file. Try EPSG:3787 MGI Slovene National Grid or EPSG:3912 MGI 1901 / Slovene National Grid. They differ in the datum shift.


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If your raster file has proper CRS information, you can leave out the source SRS. Sometimes (especially if you have towgs84 datum shifts), it is necessary to set the source SRS different from what is stored inside the file. And some raster files (like jpg and png) do not have any SRS information, but you might now they are in degrees, so set EPSG:4326 for ...


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There is a function to reproject geometry: ST_Transform( geom Geometry , newSRID Integer ) : Geometry List of functions can be found here. Note that in case you would want to rewrite existing geometry in Geometry column with reprojected data (instead of creating new table), you will need to update geometry_columns table and enter new SRID (in srid ...


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Ok, in the end I was able to assign a new projection in ArcGIS. Using the data as specified above. I still dont understand what the problem was in QGIS. Possibly the libproj library was broken.


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I guess your data uses US National Atlas Equal Area, EPSG:2163: +proj=laea +lat_0=45 +lon_0=-100 +x_0=0 +y_0=0 +a=6370997 +b=6370997 +units=m +no_defs Note that lon_0 is negative for western longitudes. and datum=none is no official definition.


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Rather than doing a "Calculate Geometry" on the new field, I needed to do a "Calculate Field" and specify the Geodesic Area function (via Python 9.3): !shape.geodesicarea@SQUAREMETERS! There was no need to do a projection at all. For my purposes, calculating the Geodesic Area yields values that area extremely close (within roughly 0.005% of the value ...


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OpenLayers won't know the definitions of the projections just because of the included Proj4js script. The projections which OpenLayers 2 supports natively are the following: EPSG:4326, CRS:84, urn:ogc:def:crs:EPSG:6.6:4326, EPSG:900913, EPSG:3857, EPSG:102113 and EPSG:102100. If you have to use an other projection, you have to define the coordinate system ...


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Oh, I so disagree with @Aaron's assertion that nearest neighbor is the best method. The common ASTER products are in radiance values and as such, are 32 bit floating point. Nearest Neighbor applied to float values will produce bias and artifacts. This is the common bias effect that results in the blocky appearance of DEM's that were reprojected using nearest ...


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Ok, redefining the coordinate system to WGS 1984 and then projecting it in the correct system has solved the problem. I followed these exact steps initially but it didn't work, maybe I encountered a glitch.


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So, I have partially solved my question: Turns out there are two versions of the EASE-Grid projection. For the MODIS Ice Surface Temperature data produced after the 1st of January 2011, the 2nd version is used, while the first version is used (I think) for any data acquired before. My solution only covers the second version of the EASE-Grid: # Clip data, ...


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You could just set up a filter list in your CR selection parameter. cr_parameter.parameterType = 'Required' cr_parameter.direction = 'Input' cr_parameter.datatype = 'GPString' cr_parameter.filter.list = ["WGS 1984", "NAD 1983 NSRS2007 StatePlane California V FIPS 0405 (US Feet)", ...


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I agree that the data is offsetted, but it is not a constant offset. I compared it with Openstreetmap boundaries from https://osm.wno-edv-service.de/boundaries/ in blue: The Vienna borders are off to the North, but the state border to the east is almost correct. So there is not much more that you can do with the data than delete it. Take the borders from ...


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The Norwegian Met office has a THREDDS server at http://thredds.met.no/thredds/ so if you see the forecast you are trying to access there, you can extract just the subset you want from the OPeNDAP URL, which NetCDF4-Python treats like a local netcdf file. For example: import netCDF4 url = ...


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netCDF4-python will let you subset (using numpy slicing syntax) the data variables without reading the full data from the disk.


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This is an answer to how you could design a heatmap. My suggestion is you look into the Quarter Degree Grid Cell system. QDGC represents a way of making (almost) equal area squares covering a specific area to represent specific qualities of the area covered. The squares themselves are based on the degree squares covering earth. Around the equator we have 360 ...


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One way to show people what the differences in projection mean in practice is to draw a long line in Google Earth. By "long line" I mean one that is visibly a Great Circle route. Everything's fine in Google Earth. But if you draw a line between the same two points in Google Maps, CartoDB or OpenStreetMap, the line is flattened onto the flat projection. Zoom ...



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