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0

correcting the CRS might be the clue: Set CRS for layer is NOT the right tool. Use Save As ... under a different name and CRS to keep the data in the right place.


1

The tool uses by default the EPSG:4326 - WGS 84 CRS. If you project is in EPSG:31467, you can see that the icon of CRS status (right down corner) is now black indicating 'enable on the fly CRS tansformation'. Save your virtual layer temp.shp with the correct EPSG and another name. I tested this in my system. The temp.shp line (EPSG 4326) produced with the ...


2

This is not really a raster in longitude latitude, it's just arrays of values (including longitude and latitude). You can deal with these explicitly like this: f <- "F18-SSUSI_EDR-NIGHT-DISK_DD.20150107_SN.26920-00_DF.NC" library(raster) ## treat these not as rasters, but as arrays of values ## though raster() is extremely helpful in simplifying the ...


1

Unfortunately, the data has no projection, because it is satellite raw data captured during the flight around the earth. The first two subdatasets contain the lonlat values, but these are not understood by GDAL. So I tried to make a scatterplot out of the data: I extracted the first three datasets to XYZ format: gdal_translate -of XYZ ...


1

The projection you are setting (proj4string(pr) <- "+proj=longlat +datum=WGS84") is wrong. That should be the projection of the original data, not the target projection. You say that the data is NOT on a lat-lon grid, so you have to find out which CRS your data has. Looking at the .nc file, it's not contained there, so you have to look through the docs ...


0

I'm not sure if this will help in your case, but this online tool may be worth a try. If you can create a shapefile of the points, this tool will attempt to guess the projection. From Projection Guesser: One of the joys of map making is getting a shapefile without a projection. We eventually decided to stop doing those puzzles manually and wrote ...


1

I discovered my error. I was expecting to see lat/lng pairs from EPSG:3857, but it's actually EPSG:4326 I should have been converting to.


1

As mkennedy noted, you're trying to format a projected coordinate (in metres) as a geographic coordinate in degrees. That's not possible! You'll need to change the grid annotation format to either "decimal" or "decimal with suffix".


1

Please keep the site order to put only one question at a time. https://trac.osgeo.org/proj/wiki/GenParms will show you what the Proj.4 parameters mean. If you have input and output, you have to define projections on both sides. Changing the proj.4 definition does not change the coordinates automatically. Instead, you make simply 12 meters out of formerly ...


2

I'm not sure how you can obtain a shapefiles initial CRS but you can reproject your shapefile to another New Zealand grid system (EPSG:27200 - NZGD49 / New Zealand Map Grid) via the Save As... option. I used QGIS 2.6.1 to successfully reproject the shapefile:


2

Since some of your desried projections may have problems with on-the-fly-reprojection, I suggest to create custom CRS for each projection, and save the shapefiles to that under a different name. Then create a new QGIS project, select the custom CRS as project CRS, and add the new shapefile layer. Some CRS might fail if the north or south pole is included.


4

Running the buffer tool will create a second polygon offset the distance you specify from the first. Corners are radiused by default, no need to crop.


4

you should use the merge tool (or the append tool) to copy your points from one dataset to the other dataset. Launched from ArcGIS, the selection will be honored + this will reproject on the fly. Your points are probably moving because their projection was not defined. This can be done using the define tool. At the end, only one coordinate system is possible ...


2

As Mapperz said, the data you have and the map example are using different projections. You may want to research the topic, as it is fundamental to GIS. If you want to change the appearance, you need to Reproject the data (aka change the coordinate system or CRS). I believe the data you have comes in GCSNAD83. Your map example looks like it might be using an ...


1

Your shapefile is probably the whole USA without state boundaries. Google USA states shapefile or go https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/tiger-cart-boundary.html and download the USA states shapefiles in the data section. To get exactly the color of the other map you need to right click the shapefile in qgis and head to properties- symbology and play ...


9

It appears to be a truncated Mollweide projection, centred on 160°W. Googling the image gives http://odtmaps.com/detail.asp?product_id=WE-Pac-Rim-32x47rolled, which lists the projection as "Homolographic Equal Area", another name for Mollweide. Generating a Mollweide at 160W using http://kartograph.org/showcase/projections/#mollweide and overlaying gives an ...


4

It appears they borrowed the map from here. The projection is listed there as "Homolographic Equal Area".


4

In general any map centered on the Pacific is going to show how big it is. The Pacific is objectively large - 30% of Earth's surface. Your map looks like it might be a cut-off Mollweide projection (notice that it not only cuts off Europe and Africa, but also doesn't show the poles or even the northern edges of the northern continents) - the cut-off ...


5

Not as stylish, but you could use: PCD Mercator : http://epsg.io/3832 EPSG: 3832 Like produced in QGIS:


5

Although it is not exactly what you are asking for, you could have a look at World Vertical Perspective, which will not show the entire world, like a Robinson would, for instance. You have not specified what software you are using, but I once made the following map in ArcGIS: You would have to go into the projection parameters and change the standard ...


1

I was able to read the projection of an .asc file with a .prj file associated. Below, there is a reproducible example, so you can try to figure out what is different regarding your .prj file. Step 3 shows the .asc file imported with a projection assigned. #load necessary packages library(raster) library(rgdal) #--------------------------- #Step 1: Create ...


2

Aparently, it doesn't. I tested it in my system (see next image): However, I revised the 'raster' package documentation and it suggests the installation of 'rgdal' library. I have rgdal installed. Do you have it? Editing Note: I tested, based in the Andre Silva answer, that the 'writeRaster' method did not write a *.prj file with the AIIGrid driver. ...


0

The basis for the PostGIS geographic type is a sphere. The basis for the PostGIS geometry type is a plane. (same link) Thus, when you run ST_Buffer on a EPSG:4326 geometry, the output is given in degrees of lat/lon. On the other hand, when you do the same for EPSG:4326 geography, you get result in meters. What you can do (besides using geography type) is ...


0

See here, at the developer's blog: http://blog.kartena.se/tag/proj4leaflet/


1

gdalwarp -geoloc allows you to use the complete 2d-array of latlon as georeference. With that, you can use any target CRS to reproject your data to a commonly used projection. See my answer to this question for an example: How to match a raster NetCDF data with a vector layer in QGIS?


0

Ciao, I though a little about your requests then I checked the geowebcache.xsd spec and I don't think you can do this without some customization within the code. Let's see if someone is more knowledgeable and/or creative than myself on this :) Simone.


2

Your model fails because your input shape files have names that contain spaces. As feature class names cannot contain spaces, you need to use add the Calculate Value tool to your model to remove spaces from your inline variable "Name" and replace them with underscores. In the model below, the Name variable is precondition to the Calculate Value tool. ...



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