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5

This is a known issue with ESRI. Their Page suggests these following workarounds (quoted from ESRI): Use one of the following two solutions to solve this issue. It is highly recommended to download and use ArcGIS Pro to perform all printing and exporting functions. ArcGIS Pro is not limited by the graphical device interface (GDI) ...


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Looking at their site, they clearly state that: Circa year 2000 Landsat 7 cloud-free image composite (first) Reference multispectral imagery from the first available year, typically 2000. If no cloud-free observations were available for year 2000, imagery was taken from the closest year with cloud-free data, within the range 1999–2012. Circa ...


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If those lines are vector lines (and not graphic lines as well) and you want to places those pictures onto them you can just add a point layer and put points where you need the symbol. Then you use your picture as a picture-marker-symbol where you can set the background or transparent-color to no-color. If you need special rotations you can put the angle ...


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Problem was that the raster was the output of the "zonal statistics tool", where I used a 5x5km vector grid as reference. I thought the raster was automatically resampled at 5x5km pixel size, but it was not. Basically it was 30x30m pixel size and this is why I got such a huge amount of points.


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Also, an easy way is to use Reclassify tool where you should click the button Classify and change the number of classes to 1. Click Ok. Now, the output raster can be easily converted using Raster to Polygon conversion Tool. ;)


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I suggest to remove projection information in R output raster and open it in ArcGIS. If successful, define projection from within latter. I applied this trick with vectors coming from MapInfo to ESRI products. Slight difference in projection naming by these two packages had devastating result with points being 200 m away from their true position. Good ...


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As per @IvanSanchez' suggestion I'm going g to have web-ready 8-bit rasters with accompanying json metadata files. The metadata files have max and min values from the original 32-bit rasters which we use to interpolate the 0-255 values from the 8bit rasters so we can explore the values in real time.


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Euclidean Distance is an ArcGis tool but can also be an operation in GRASS, QGIS or other software package... If I assume ArcGis I would say have a look at your environment settings especially Output Extent, CellSize and Snap Raster and set all three to your constant raster, but that would only be if you were using ArcGis. – Michael Miles-Stimson


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If you edit the image in Photoshop you can use the magic eraser tool to remove the white background. Any white space will become transparent so make sure you use the paint bucket tool in photoshop to color any white space you want to show as white as a slightly off-white color that won't be noticeable. Save the Image as a BMP. Insert the image as a marker. ...



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