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7

It will work on a 64 Bit Machine, yes, but only from the 32 bit Python interpreter. It is documented: The ExportReport function has a dependency on the ArcMap installation. Therefore, ExportReport can only be executed on machines that have ArcMap installed. ExportReport will not run using stand-alone installations of ArcGIS Engine or ArcGIS for Server. ...


3

If you are interested in PDF output via Python/ArcPy, then I have used the ReportLab open-source PDF Toolkit to do something similar. Its syntax is non-trivial but I found that the results were worth the learning curve. Some of my learnings resulted in StackOverflow Questions and Answers.


3

Assuming you already know (or are willing to learn) Python, I would recommend looking into the open-source Python ReportLab Toolkit libraries. I have seen a number of Esri presentations that have incorporated it into their processes for on-the-fly, custom report generation. There is also a spinoff library called Geraldo, which "is a reports engine for ...


3

I think you should put Data Driven Pages (DDP) to one side for now, because if that introduces any limitations to an application like this, they can usually be overcome by using a SearchCursor to iterate through the feature class that would have been your DDP index. The key thing will be whether you can get ArcPy to run arcpy.mapping.ExportReport to run ...


3

At the 2012 ESRI User conference, they demonstrated building custom PDF pages and reports using the open-souce ReportLab toolkit. Check out the Conference proceedings and look at the Technical Workshops for Python Map Automation. One of them makes a reference to this sample script.


3

arcpy.management.MakeFeatureLayer doesn't make a layer file, it makes a layer in memory. ExportReport requires a layer object. Combining the two, you can do this: # Make the layer arcpy.management.MakeFeatureLayer("SOILFC", "soil_layer") # Get reference to layer lyr = arcpy.mapping.Layer("soil_layer") # Do the magic part arcpy.mapping.ExportReport(lyr, ...


2

MakeFeatureLayer makes an in_memory layer. When using that tool you dont supply an extension. A layer with an extension of .lyr is a layerfile on disk. Typically a layer file on disk is a pointer to data with symbology set. Anyways... to answer your question, you want an arcpy.mapping.Layer for use with the export tool Try this....(assuming you have a .LYR ...


2

I don't think you can decide to include the commas as part of the report creation process. However, if you go to the Fields tab of the Properties for the Layer containing SUM_ACRES then its Appearance includes Number Format set to Numeric. Hit the ... button and you will be able to tick the checkbox for Show thousands separators. Once the field has the ...


2

Today, I am doing a very similar report(s). I have got 90 or so points / maps to go.... I am using the print composer in QGIS Trunk. For the shapefile data, that is just an inserted attribute table in the composer. You apply a query to the layer to show only the features of interest in the attribute table. I let the composer create a pdf, then using ...


2

I use ReportLab with ArcGIS Geoprocessing Services. It has a syntax that takes some getting used to but works great at 10.0 and 10.1! Of your desired functions the only one I am not currently doing is charts - because I have not yet had a requirement to investigate it.


2

I don't think it is possible to do this at 10.0 but in the What's New at 10.1 PDF (which is available via resources.esri.com) two new properties on the Layer class of arcpy.mapping are described: ▪ maxScale—Provides the ability to set or get the layer's maximum scale threshold. ▪ minScale—Provides the ability to set or get the layer's minimum scale ...


2

My personal call would be to go with jinja2 as the SO question you linked to suggests. You could extend that if you prefer working with markdown with the jinja2 markdown extension which will hopefully mean you won't have to write as much into your template. Otherwise if you'd rather an Excel report (which might not suit your use-case of interactivity ...


2

If your analysis is done using the geoprocessing tools, you can open the geoprocessing results tab and see all the tools used in your session or previous sessions. I have not experimented much with it but looks like you can create python script snippets or save it to a results file (rlt.) That would be the closest thing.


2

You could use import os myfile = r"C:\temp\test.pdf" os.system("start " + myfile) Just tested running this chunk of code from Python add-in from ArcMap and it works fine. More discussion on using this is here.


1

It seems that it only provides this functionality if you group by a field, so you need at least 2 fields in your data. So in short, the answer is no. Not the way you want to do it. The main function of the reporting tools is to allow you to summarise data by groups. Below I've tried to outline the process of creating the summary you want using a group. ...


1

An open-source Python option is the ReportLab toolkit. Esri even uses it for some of their projects. The documentation is pretty good, and there are tons of examples on getting started out on the web (below from Mouse V. Python) from reportlab.pdfgen import canvas c = canvas.Canvas("hello.pdf") c.drawString(100,750,"Welcome to Reportlab!") c.save() In ...


1

The Report Writer can only be used interactively to author reports. However, once you have authored your Report Layout Format (*.rlf) file you can use it with the ExportReport (arcpy.mapping) function to export data from tables or feature classes into the report layout that you have pre-authored. This functionality could be placed behind a Python AddIn ...


1

You could display isochrones instead. That way, it's possible to display multiple thresholds (instead of just the one 20 min threshold in your example). Additionally, the last stop which was only visible in a detail map will also become visible in the main map as a center of isochrones. Since you seem to want to show a before-and-after comparison, you could ...


1

There is an ArcGIS Idea that requests a Macro Recorder for Python which sounds like it may be what you are after.


1

Run the Check Geometry tool first. This creates an output table listing feature level geometry issues.


1

There is a new development in 10.1 for Python access in reporting: ExportReport. Essentially you create a report and save the layout as a report layout file (.rlf). When you call ExportReport from arcpy you access the layout file.


1

Marc, you can try the Photo2Shape plugin to quickly get gps-tagged photos into QGIS with an associated shapefile. Available via the Plugin Installer. For more robust photo keying, with data, consider trying out the eVis plugin (core, embedded plugin that ships with QGIS). You can enable it in the Plugin Manager. You may also be interested in this PDF on ...


1

The Transform tool generates the report. Go to the 'Results' pane. If it has not been activated go to 'Geoprocessing->Results' from the main menu. In here you can get the reports of all the tools you have run recently, including some historic information. Find where you ran the Transform tool and click on 'Messages->view'. The Results pane is a great ...



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