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4

GPS Visualizer will take a Google Map route (url) and convert to .gpx "You can ignore most the options, just select Gpx and paste the Google Maps URL into the box labelled “provide the URL of a file on the Web” and then press the Convert button" http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/convert_input Guide ...


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One possibility would be to use a turns feature class or table to model an increased time impedance for all turns. The idea would be to use a high value for turns (such as 15-20) seconds, and a low impedance for straights (0-5). Then, as routes are created, every time a turn is the "fastest route", the additional impedance time will likely influence the ...


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QGIS cannot convert OSM data into a routable graph. There are other tools which specialize on this task: osm2pgrouting open source osm2po free but not open source Both convert OSM data into a routable graph for import into PostGIS. From there, you can export in a format that you can feed into ArcGIS.


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You can try RoadGraph plugin/Network analysis library. If you have two layers (they should be properly snapped): Set some settings Select point Start and Stop Calculate This plugin is based on a library that can be used to run queries programmatically. I don't know if English manual for it exists, here is Google Translated description of this ...


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As an answer to both Uffe Kousgaard comments about "what the 18GB file contains" compared to a routable shapefile, and a possible answer to this question: You don't explicitly state it, but I guess you used the ArcGIS Editor for OpenStreetMap to convert your data. If not, I really recommend to have a look at it, as it contains a dedicated option to create ...


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You can use OpenRouteService to add custom avoid areas / danger zones etc. The only alternative seems to be BRouter corresponding to the wiki overview.


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Assuming you have ArcMap and a Network Analyst extension (as mentioned in your question) it is possible to use OSM data for routing without using qgis. The most important is that you need to generate a routable network (called "network dataset" in esri world). Eva Peters created a tool called OSM2NetworkDataset which converts OSM datasets (*.osm) into a ...


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So here are the code and summary of the aforementioned bugs, as requested by @Chris W. Basically they seem to refer to the same issue and to have the same cause, i.e. a problem with the OD cost algorithm. NIM094092 - The OD cost matrix analysis in ArcMap returns different travel time results for one origin if another origin is present. NIM060948 - Time and ...


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Here is a list: Create a simple in-memory graph with nodes and edges. Apply A* to it (there are many examples on the web) Then look into the OSM data structure and build a simple parser (or reuse existing) to fill your in-memory graph then run A* on it via nodeIDs or lat/lon for start and end location create the address search which returns a nodeID or ...


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You can use the pgRouting function pgr_nodeNetwork, which will create nodes at intersections of linestrings. So in your case it will split the linestring into two geometries. But there is a danger that intersections, that should not be connected (ie. over- or under-passes), will also get broken into two segments.


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I can answer the 2nd part of your question, the first one has me a little tied up now too I'll edit if no one answers when I get my head around it. So for 2) just use something in the line of routeControl._routes[0].summary.totalDistance See if this works, also _routes[0] represents your choice for example if you have another routing option for which you ...


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The good way would be to Contribute your data to OSM so they would be included in the future osm extracts. If for some reason you cannot do that; Use data staging techniques. Download the extract somewhere, and call it source, duplicate source and add your extra nodes without breaking the topology, (OSM work in topological level if i remember correctly); ...


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If you intent to create a derivative database then you have to share parts of your work. For more information read the Legal FAQ, especially section 3. And ideally contact your lawyer.


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I'd look here: += 'L.latLng('` What is split_route meant to be? A multi-point array? Can you just construct this as an array and pass this in as waypoints? var split_route = []; for (x = 0; x < route1.length ; x++) { var coords = []; coords.push(route1[x].ordered_locs.displayLatLng.lat, route1[x].ordered_locs.displayLatLng.lng); ...


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You have no "seq" column in the inner select, and you use the column aliases in an opposite way. I suppose you should write: SELECT gid as seq, source as id1, target as id2, cost FROM pgr_kdijkstraCost(...


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As well as Floyd-Warshall, for all-pairs routing, you could consider Johnson's algorithm. An alternative to running Dijkstra for each intersection could be to run A* as the latter is usually considered to be faster. I recommend you have a look at PgRouting, which is a plugin to PostGIS. It would be straightforward enough to import your data to PostGIS. ...


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The first comment about merging points to lines will get you to the closest road, but this will not take into account the terrain cost (ie going through a forest or up a mountain may be a shorter distance but will take much longer than a longer distance but easier travelled clear route) To do this like the comment said it is simply a euclidian distance trig ...


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It depends on what kind of result you expect to get. From your question, it may seem as VRP would be the best analysis type. You will define during the VRP analysis: each bus capacity (number of students it can take); what time of the day each bus can start driving and what time will they stop driving; maximum driving time for each bus (if you have any ...


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I have found that the OSM data is good for street routing even if it doesn't have all the street names, the road edges are pretty good. There are solutions out there that do a pretty good job of doing what you are looking for without needing to fully implement. A good starting point is OpenStreetMap Routing Project at http://project-osrm.org/ But as a ...


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I think you're on the right track, but my reading of your current problem could be solved - and I mean this in good spirits - by doing the pgRouting workshop: http://pgrouting.org/documentation.html -- see the workshop and tutorials part. The value here is you'll get a good sense of what you can do with your MapZen extract, how to use OSM2PGRouting, how to ...


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To export a route to KML you'll have to use Google MyMaps. add a route to new or existing layer drag and drop the route to suit your needs Open the maps options menue (3 dots above the layers) Export to KML You can then use any service to convert the KML to GPX. I prefer GPSies.


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I had a similar problem importing romania and hungary sql files bun not in the case of us imports. The problem was that some segments were not inserted because of an encoding problem. Solved this by changing the client encoding to UTF8 in the psql console. The code I used looks like this: mydatabase-# \encoding UTF8 mydatabase-# \i ...


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As already commented: If you need to estimate better speeds for every road from your taxi tracks that is completely doable with GraphHopper and this open source map matching component for it.


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I realized I had omitted another good link for you. There is an interesting blog by one of the ESRI developers involved in the HPC stuff (Mansour Raad). I hadn't visited it for a while, but it turns out he actually wrote an article about invoking a Spark job from within ArcGIS for Desktop using ArcGIS Geoprocessing tools. There is code samples as well. I ...


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There are a couple of things coming to my mind here: First, and foremost, why you feel the need to use an unproven HPC routing solution to do something for which the OSM community already developed proven and tested solutions? Routing on OSM data has been implemented as several Open Source projects (See http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Routing. Even ESRI ...


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since the parameter you mentioned is only available via the asynchronous service documentation you've linked to, your best bet would be to make your call to it via a generic Geoprocessor Task. this approach allows you finer grain control both in defining execution type and specifying parameters by name.


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Open Source Routing Machine is a project of Open Street Map (OSM) also provides distance matrix results although you may find that a 1k x 1k matrix is pushing it. You can build and install locally or use use their API for small sets of points. I believe that there is even a docker instance for the OSRM which you can populate with OpenStreetMap data. I would ...


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Streets data are the most important part of your project. You have to get vector data with few requirements: it must be a complete network, without gaps and isolated streets each street beetween two nodes should be a single object, it should start and end in particular node, you can even split streets to straight lines (each single straight line is single ...


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If you have to implement your own, then read here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A*_search_algorithm That way you learn the most. But if you start from scratch and want to implement ALL steps on your own, then it is a major task you are looking at.


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With reference to the answer in the comment above: It is sufficient to use the static Graph. The OverlayGraph is not needed here: Graph graph = new Graph(...) int vertexId = graph.findClosestVertexId(lat, lon); // Find nearest crossing int[] edgeIdxs = graph.findOutgoingEdges(vertexId); edgeIdxs is an array of indexes (pointers) to the edges inside the ...



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