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With OpenLayers 2 I just used a method of the OpenLayers-feature to check wether it is within a geofencing-zone.I haven't tried this with ol3. Another option would be turf: https://www.mapbox.com/blog/turf-gis-for-web-maps/ See the section"Water Fountains accessible within xxx feet". Instead of water fountains you could use your gps-position with a buffer ...


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If your objective is to develop a routing program over the sea returning various maritime routes from (origin,destination) pairs, you should rather rely on a linear mesh covering the seas, instead of polygons. I had exactly the same goal and I did something using: The shipping lane dataset "Oak Ridge National Labs CTA Transportation Network Group, Global ...


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This is a great post highlighting available solutions. We went the OSM pgRouting approach for drive time / distance polygons and packaged it up into a service that we are using with our premium Google Maps extension. I am happy to share how we built it if you are interested. Happy to spread the knowledge. Here is how we ultimately packaged it up. ...


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Also, look under the advanced settings tab. There, you can set the importance of Time-Window Violations, which can increase or decrease travel time depending on your choice, whether you want to reach locations on time, or service more locations within the time frame. There is also an Excess Transit Time, set to high, the solver tries to find a solution ...


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I was able to resolve this by changing the Search Tolerance of the Add Stops tool to a higher number.


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If I understand your question right, you have the Network Analyst extension, you should be able to snap your origin/destination points to the network automatically. If you look under the Network Analyst Options there are Location Snap Options. There is more information in this help page: ...


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ArcMap should do this for you automatically (snap off-network points to the nearest spot on the network) when you load locations into your analysis layer using the Network Analyst toolbar. If you need more control over which classes get locations snapped to them, you can do this in the "Layer Properties" window of your network analysis layer. See "Search ...


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Yes, you can do this with pgRouting. As a starting point I would recommend you to look at the pgRouting Workshop. Most efficient for your case might be the one-to-many shortest path funtion named kDijkstra. You could import your node-pairs into a PostgreSQL database or just write a small application that reads the CSV file and then runs the SQL queries. ...


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Ok so you have a field called "tt" which is your travel times, lets assume they represent whole hours. When you are building your network you'll get to the stage of specifying your attributes, default is length. At this point you add a new a attribute, see image below. Having added it right click on it and select Evaluators and set the type to field and ...


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I don't know in which format your data is? Maybe you could use the tool 'add GTFS to network dataset'? You can find more information at this site.


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Some good software for this purpose is TauDEM (Terrain Analysis Using Digital Elevation Models). Main page, with info, publications, and downloads for command tools and optional ArcGIS Toolbox interface Source code on GitHub The software uses both D8 and so-called D-infinity (D∞) flow models, which is best illustrated on Fig. 1 of Tesfa et al. (2011). ...


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I have solved a similar problem for a municipality where if a water main breaks they wanted to know where the water goes and what infrastructure, streams, etc. are going to get impacted. If you are using ArcMap then you can use the Cost Path geoprocessing tool. Tool parameters: Input raster or feature destination data - a point representing your spill ...


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This is a simplistic example of using googles driving directions.



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