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2

It may seem like laziness on the part of Watershed tool developers to stick with the simplest and oldest flow algorithm, D8, but there is a very sound reason for doing so. The difference between the D8/Rho8 flow algorithm and the more advanced algorithms that you mention (e.g. D-infinity) is mainly in their inability to represent the dispersion of overland ...


3

At the moment, I could only easily find data for the UK: http://data.dft.gov.uk/gb-traffic-matrix/Raw_count_data_major_roads.zip It's in .csv format so you can manipulate it in Excel or by using other softwares (much easier than pdf's!). It also contains coordinates to immediately import the points into GIS software (tested this successfully with QGIS). ...


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I have a fully functional, open source , freely hosted, GTFS Editor here http://gee.chalo.org.uk:9080/Gee/Eric.html


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jsprit can solve your problem. It is a java based, open source toolkit for solving rich traveling salesman (TSP) and vehicle routing problems (VRP). Rich means here that you can model an arbitrary number of constraints that account for your business requirements such as skills, time-windows etc.. And in conjunction with jsprit, you can use GraphHopper.


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Have a look at all the OpenStreetMap Routers which are available for desktop, mobile or server scenario. But I fear you'll still have to do a bit coding for your requirements.


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Cześć Piotr Read this answer, it's quite similar case. If it will not help then write some answers: How big are your source and target tables? How big is your table with road network? Is it OK to find nearest point euclidean and then count road distance? EDIT AFTER ANSWERS Ok, so one of resolutions is (pseudo-code): Create table with distance from every ...


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You can try jsprit. If you determine the time windows where both drivers meet each other at a specified location a priori, then it is easy to model (just look at the 'Simple Example' in the wiki to figure out how you model and solve such a problem). Time windows are defined as follows: ...


0

You can use GraphHopper for that task, which also supports different mode like walking or biking and uses OpenStreetMap per default. You'll need some Java coding which explores the road network from the starting point similar to how the Dijkstra algorithms works and then you can get something like the following: The code will collect the points which you ...


1

If you want a GUI for pgRouting, you can install the pgRoutingLayer plugin for QGIS. It provides a GUI to access pgRouting functions to compute routes. The routes can be displayed and exported to QGIS layers which you can manipulate and analyze any way you want. You can see the plugin in action in the following screenshot (panel on the right). The plugin ...


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Our RW Net 4 library can handle your three needs, from either QGIS (python) or MapInfo, with MapInfo being somewhat easier. But it isn't open source and I hope it isn't confusing.


2

You could calculate a buffer (not more than 5 meters) for the start- and endpoint of every linestring. Then, intersect the buffer with the road network. A line that doesn't intersect with the buffer is likely to be a "correct" unconnected road. However, you'll have to play with the buffer radius for satisfactory results.



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