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The approach I ended up using is the following: I buffer the forest stands, which are represented as centroids (green dots) in the image above. I create a fishnet grid over the entire area of interest. I determine for each fishnet grid cell, how many timber stands are within that grid cell. I determine the grid cell with the highest number of stands ...


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You should use id3 of the result instead of id2 because id3 is the edge id according to http://docs.pgrouting.org/dev/src/ksp/doc/index.html


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Well, there are just very few .NET components esp. for routing with OSM: http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Frameworks http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Routing/offline_routers In short: I guess a wrapper is a better way to deal with your requirements, esp. as you seem to be lucky with MoNav in general.


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source and target attribute contain node ID's. Each node ID should be unique, but it can appear multiple times in source and target column, because a node can be the connecting point for more than one road link. Depending of the direction (defined by the geometry) of the road link the node ID is source or target.


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You can also use our RW Net or RW NetServer products for local calculations. OSM is a possible data source, but depending upon where in the world you are, there are many more, either pulicly owned (some free) or commercial ones. You also need to geocode your addresses, it is not clear if they already have coordinates?


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Actually you can use two tools, both are easy to install on your own server. OSRM writen in C++ and Lua GraphHopper if you prefer Java


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Just to close this loose end, since I asked the question a new package was released called osmar which contains a vignette of how to implement shortest path algorithms in R using Open Street Map data: http://osmar.r-forge.r-project.org/ . It uses the function get.shortest.paths from the igraph package. Excellent article on this can be found here: ...



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