Hot answers tagged

10

100-200 users a day are (normally) nothing, a notebook can take that kind of load if the map is not complex. General guidelines: get enough memory (at least 8GB) but don't give it all to GeoServer use Intel CPUs, not AMDs, as JAI native extensions work faster on Intel try to get two servers and set them up in cluster for high availability (2 quad core ...


6

Rolling your own methodology with timestamps and triggers can work as long as you are not using versioning. Otherwise, it complicates things. If you are using versioning, you can figure out the features that have changed with various APIs. For example, you can use the ArcSDE versioning API, but you will be prone to error and will corrupt your data if you ...


6

These are my two favorite which run on linux. I believe they do meet your requirements. Even though they are free, you can pay for support. "linux is free if your time is worthless" (for "free" as in cost - "free" as in freedom isn't about money... http://geoserver.org http://mapserver.org/ There are also "products" built out of these, such as the ...


6

Your 10.1 license server can host cocurrent use licenses for all 10.x and 9.x products. We have a 10.1 license manager in production, our client environment is mix of 10 and 10.1 products. http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/install-guides/license-manager/10.1/index.html#/License_Manager_Basics/007900000003000000/


5

Here's how we ended up doing it. It was a several day process, and as ujjwalesri suggested, a fail-over as a standard configuration is the way to go. However, we weren't lucky enough to have a fail-over. For the most part this worked, but we encountered a couple issues. After installation of ArcGIS Server and post install, etc. we copied over the files ...


5

Choosing the right server is always a hard thing to do because in a short time your service may become very popular, turning your thousand dollars hardware useless. -Since every application (even if they use the same software stack) has it's own demand, my advice is to run some stress tests in a cloud based server, like amazon AWS. The costs to run those ...


4

This is more of a long comment rather than an answer but New York are rolling out bus tracking with OpenGeo. The Portland metro area are also using an opensource project called Trimet for tracking all public transit. Not sure if either project is directly relevant but maybe some of the code or libraries used are.


4

I wrote up my experiences at http://ian01.geog.psu.edu/geoserver_docs/ which should answer most of your questions. The key step is installing Oracle's Java instead of OpenJDK.


4

GeoNetwork may be worth a look: http://www.osgeo.org/geonetwork GeoNetwork opensource is a catalog application to manage spatially referenced resources. It provides powerful metadata editing and search functions as well as an embedded interactive web map viewer. GeoNetwork opensource has been developed to connect spatial information communities and their ...


4

On a simple level, if you define a bounding box for the Czech Republic you can construct an SQL query to test if the X and Y coordinates are within the maximum and minimum coordinates of the bounding box. The query would be something like: SELECT * FROM [TABLE] WHERE [X_FIELD] BETWEEN [BOUND_XMIN] AND [BOUND_XMAX] AND [Y_FIELD] BETWEEN [BOUND_YMIN] AND ...


4

ArcGIS Server (Linux) 10.1 http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/install-guides/arcgis-server-unix/10.1/index.html#//00sz00000012000000 ESRI has greatly improved it install process of ArcGIS Server on Linux http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/install-guides/arcgis-server-unix/10.1/index.html#/What_s_new_in_ArcGIS_10_1_for_Server_install/00sz00000012000000/ ...


3

Although my knowledge of WebGeo Library is limited and their website was a bit tedious to read I guess that the Open Geo Suite could be something worth taking a look at. There exists a free community edition as well as a supported enterprise version. It's based on components such as PostGIS, Geoserver and GeoEXT, and should cover your needs. Take a look at ...


3

After following some links from an article that Celenius mentioned I ran into OneBusAway. An Open Source project by the University of Washington that is developing Apache licensed modern applications (web, iPhone, Android) and modules to solve tracking problems.


3

MapServer is typically a single CGI binary that can be installed in most places. If your host has the dependencies available as libraries, taking a copy from another system might even work, but more realistically, you'd probably have to compile a statically linked binary (building the libraries right into MapServer); once you did, it would be possible to ...


3

If you're looking for something free (although for a limited time) you could use an Amazon Web Services free-tier micro instance. I've had success setting up geoserver, and the entire OpenGeo stack on an Ubuntu micro instance > http://bit.ly/vJAAD4


3

You will need a Linux machine to deploy what you have been working on. I would use nginx as webserver/reverse proxy (because it serves static tiles very fast), the rest (tilestache,django) are very familiar on Linux distro (Ubuntu particularly), you can find many tutorials about deployment of Django + nginx on Google.


3

Sounds like a perfect scenario for OpenLayers and an image layer for your base map. Get a nice high rez image generated and you can host it on a simple http server (apache/iis/etc...). e.g.: http://openlayers.org/dev/examples/image-layer.html And then in OL you can set the extend bounds so you your users don't pan outside of texas, ...


3

Not exactly an answer, but have you seen The Open Source Routing Machine (OSRM) Their routing engine works on OSM-data it seems, but it is opensource, so it could provide som pointers. And their implementation is FAST: http://map.project-osrm.org/


3

Google's Fusion Tables is a free product, and has the ability to make heat maps from points. You would load your lat/long points into the fusion table, specify that the fields denoted lat/long, and check the Heatmap option. There's a good example here. Note that there's no control over how the heatmap is generated, so it may not suit your advanced purposes ...


3

You can try using backup software like Norton Ghost. Using this you can create an "image" of your server and create an exact replica on another server. However, you need to consider certain things in mind: If the source server has some software issues, because of which you're creating another instance, the issues will also port to the new machine! If the ...


3

If you make any changes to the configuration files (most notably pg_hba.conf), you need to signal the database server to reload. If your database server is on a Windows computer, this is likely in the start menu: Start > PostgreSQL 9.0 > Reload Configuration or if it is on a POSIX system (Linux, Mac OS X, etc.), the direct way is with pg_ctl reload [-s] ...


3

Assuming you network is secure: # Allow a user from host 192.168.0.100 to connect to database # "postgres" if the user's password is correctly supplied. # # TYPE DATABASE USER IP-ADDRESS METHOD host postgres all 192.168.0.100 md5 http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.2/static/auth-pg-hba-conf.html#EXAMPLE-PG-HBA.CONF ...


3

Cloudmade Web Map Services is using OpenStreetMap - you can choose the tile rendering (style,background data etc) They use a PostGIS backend for most parts of the map rendering http://cloudmade.com/products/web-maps-studio They have an alternative http://leaflet.cloudmade.com/ which is new. An Example site using Cloudmade is KnapSack 2 ...


3

Is there a particular reason why you are doing it server-side? OpenLayers contains the ability to cluster vector features client-side. The benefit of doing it client-side is that OpenLayers will take care of the clustering for you as you zoom in and out of the map rather than you having to do it server-side. Clustering can be added to the vector layer using ...


3

In QGIS 2.2.0 you can use the Add WMS/WMTS Layer menu option directly; then when you create a new connection you need to supply the url to the WMTS capabilities document. When you connect to your WMTS, you then select the Tilesets tab option and select the layer you want to use.


3

You could use TileMill to make tiles as MBTiles: https://www.mapbox.com/tilemill/ Then use something like python-mbtiles to serve it up: https://github.com/perrygeo/python-mbtiles.


3

If by "run fully" you specifically mean increase max tables, disk quota, account type, etc., see the commented out parts at the bottom of this script: # Update your quota to 10GB echo "--- Updating quota to 10GB" bundle exec rake cartodb:db:set_user_quota["${SUBDOMAIN}",10240] if test $? -ne 0; then exit 1; fi # Allow unlimited tables to be created echo ...


3

Boundless has a product called Mapmeter, which can be used to monitor your Geoserver deployment. It has several features such as monitoring Layer Usage, Service Usage, User Activity etc. Here is a good page to help you get started with Mapmeter


3

The expression "host the OpenLayers map on site" isn't much clear as using OpenLayers is more a client side topic: OpenLayers is a JavaScript library and works on the browser. Using OpenLayers doesn't depend in any way on the hosting machine. So I assume you would like to set up a geographic server. The things you should care about are: processing power ...


3

Command-line dump straight into psql is the best bet pg_dump -h host1 -t yourtable database1 | psql -d database2 -h host2 The line in the middle is a pipe, it takes the output from the first command and provides it as input to the second.



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