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A shapefile is a simple, nontopological format for storing the geometric location and attribute information of geographic features. Geographic features in a shapefile can be represented by points, lines, or polygons (areas). The workspace containing shapefiles may also contain dBASE tables, which can store additional attributes that can be joined to a ...


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This is a reasonably simple problem to solve in ArcGIS. Open the Shapefile (it's not a "raster shapefile" btw; there's no such thin). Add two fields to your shapefile. One for Lat, one for Lon. Both should be of type Float or double. Populate one of these fields with the X, and one with the Y value for the point. (Using "calculate geometry"). Now, create ...


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You need to set a definition query (see link in @PolyGeo's answer) to show only the selected features that you wanted labeled. This can be done through the definition query tab in properties or through the labelling options called label classes (note - see @ChrisW comments below). I use these solution quite regularly and find them easy to do.


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The Symbology tab of the Layer Properties does not perform any selections. If you want the same features to not be labelled, I recommend that you apply a Definition Query instead: When you specify a dataset that you want to draw as a map layer, you often only want to draw some of the features in the dataset. In these situations, you can define a ...


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After taking @PolyGo's suggestion, I contacted QSpatial regarding if a parish boundary dataset exists for Queensland (Australia) - this was the response: "Parish names and boundaries are actually historical information. Parish mapping and the parish information in the DCDB has not been maintained for many years. Unfortunately as the parish boundaries are ...


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You should be able to get this from the Queensland Spatial Catalogue (QSpatial). The Cadastral (DCDB) datasets, at least for each Local Government Area (LGA), have a field for PARISH, which can be used to dissolve them out. The only catch is that there will be gaps in the dissolved parishes that represent the roads. I think that it is quite likely that ...


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I think another way of doing this is to just add the text file to ArcMap, display by x,y coordinates, and join to your to your original shapefile. You can then export the resulting shapefile (or just the table) as whatever you want.


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You need to write an expression in the label tool, to make only your desired values visible. Double-click the layer properties and select the label tab. Locate the "Expression" button and select it. Now you have to write the expression that will visualize only the desired values. You can choose between VBScript, Python, Jscript. You will need to check ...


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This should be a comment, but it's too long so I've added it as an answer to provide a little more info: @TsvGis County and Parish are no longer part of legal descriptions of land. The do still feature on survey plans and property contracts, but more so for historical reference purposes. Parish boundaries were drawn on Parish Maps which were fairly small ...


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Apparently there seems to be no such source... the closest I could get to is using textual sources describing the time zone changes in detail for different admin areas and then composing the shapefiles myself from available shapefiles of the Russian admin areas, e.g. with QGIS or ArcMap. The best text sources describing the changes that I could find are: ...



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