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7

It looks like it could be from the Project Linework website. Specifically, the "Angular" or "Twenty Seventy" datasets.


5

In 2.8 - 2.14 (Not sure about earlier versions) you can export shape files to PostGIS using the build in DB Manager. Open DB Manager In the list of PostGIS databases find the one you want to export to, find the desired schema and pres the button marked with the red outline. Choose the shape file in 'input' (Has to be in your 'Layers Panel') and press ...


4

You can skip the CSV step and just go straight to shapefile using pgsql2shp, which is installed a part of PostGIS. You could also use ogr2ogr.


3

As you discovered by trial and error, there were few nagging issues you needed to fix, the last of which was resolved using ogr2ogr's -nlt GEOMETRY* argument. * Note the recommendation in @LeeHachadoorian's comment that -nlt PROMOTE_TO_MULTI be used as a default solution, rather than nlt GEOMETRY, as the former promotes best practice in addition to ...


3

There is a python module called rasterstats that does compute zonal statistics. For each Polygon, your fields, there will be the underlying rastercells accumulated by SUM, MEAN, MIN or MAX. You find more infos and examples here: https://github.com/perrygeo/python-rasterstats Otherwise you find an example without this module here: ...


3

The "SPIT" plugin is no longer bundled with QGIS, as the plugin was unmaintained and has been surpassed by DB Manager and the processing database import algorithms. changelog.qgis.org/


2

Figured this out. This process should work for any shapefile held in a Postgis database, and will put it in a format that can then be plotted as a polygon in Tableau directly from the database; no mucking about importing or exporting stuff. It will create a new table containing the data in the shapefile in a format thats usable by Tableau. The more ...


2

I think first of all you'll have to split the csv-files you bought in order to generate 'small' shapefiles of valid size. Then possibly it is a suitable approach for you to load your shapefiles into a PostGIS database and do the merge in the database? Thus you shouldn't have anymore problems with file size an the processing would be faster too.


2

There is a tool bundled with PostGIS 2.2: PostGIS 2.0 Shapefile and DBF Loader Exporter It allows you to import and export.


1

As a free on-line solution for the conversion of CSV with WKB data you can use MyGeodata Converter. Just name your column with WKB data as "wkb" - like this example: id,name,wkb 1,Point 1,010100000000000000000048400000000000003340 2,Point 2,010100000000000000000046400000000000002E40 The WKB data will be automatically recognized based on the occurence of ...


1

ShapeFiles have size limits: .shp maximum 8gb The other parts, for example .dbf do not, but are recommended to not exceed 2gb. http://www.gdal.org/drv_shapefile.html


1

This is an approximate answer, because there is a small possibility of a mistake if two "clusters" of polygons are very close together, it is long, but hopefully quite straight forward. Buffer the polygon layer by a small amount, tick the dissolve box. Spatial join the polygon layer to the buffer layer ("Buffer1") This will give you a table with several ...


1

Most simply - because EVERYTHING can read/write a shapefile and by and large they work. Which makes them frustratingly universal when working with multiple software packages (ESRI/QGIS/AutoCad/etc). They're everywhere, and the name has been genericized from a specific file format to a term reflecting ALL spatial data. (I have definitely asked clients ...


1

For some reason integer fields aren't always recognized as valid for graduated styling. Putting the integer values into real number fields solves the problem. Now I can copy the layer freely and the real number fields appear as options for graduated on all copies of the layer.



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