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0

There is now also the new relocator plugin. (marked as experimental as well at this moment). Gives you the opportunity to save all layers with the project file into one directory or even in a zip-file.


1

The good news is that your data is good. Your file is not displaying correctly in ArcGIS because the spatial index for a shapefile is not updated during editing in QGIS. The comment reply by elrobis has an excellent suggestion to use ogr2ogr to export the file, which should fix the index problem. Simply deleting the spatial index files (.sbn and .sbx) will ...


3

Copy/Paste your shapefile to the Data Frame/Table of Contents so you have two copies of the same shapefile: Definition query one of the copies for Yes values, query the other for No values: Then symbolize each by ID field: The result should be something like this: Just a disclaimer, this method is purely for display purposes.


0

you can use quick import tool in data interoperabilty toolbox to covert your data to arcgis geodatabase then expot those feature class to shape file.


0

The attribute data in a Shapefile is stored in a dBase III file (.dbf) which is a file format that's over thirty years old. This format has no native support for encryption or security, so if you send someone a Shapefile there is no way to prevent them from accessing or changing the data.


1

If you specifically want a single elevation (or specific elevations) as lines you can use Contour List (3d analyst, Spatial analyst). Unlike Contour (3d analyst, Spatial analyst) which creates contours at a specific interval the contour list tool produces contour isolines at specific elevation values.. for this example you would supply the value 0 for ...


2

Right click whichever field/s you want to withhold, select 'Turn Field Off', export as you normally would, the field/s will not be in the export.


1

Please try to change the second part of the SQL-Statement: e.g. update lidar_pts set z= st_z(GEOMETRY) It worked fine for me with mulitpart-points - documented here http://isticktoit.net/?p=1117


0

At the end I did not have to use the QGIS Modeler, even if probably its implementation would be more efficient of my solution. I have used "Eliminate Sliver Polygon" from the "Processing Toolbox" as a "Batch Process". I have selected all my shape files, then manually filled in: Selection Attribute: name of the field in my table, in uppercase, no quotes; ...


0

using arcmap 10.1 Open the attribute table of reclassify raster and select the areas whose intersection to be checked with road lines, this is optional and need only when you are checking relation ship with specific area for example river area with road lines. 2.Open the arc toolbox and expand Conversion toolbox. Expand "From raster" tools and select ...


-1

The Qgis Modeler isn't near as good as the ArcGis equivalent. If you want to stay with Qgis // opensource. You should really start using python//pyqgis Follow this link to Pyqgis And in your case it isn't that complicated : a loop over all your layers, an applying 2 operations is all you need. Here is a hint : To get hold of all your layers : ...


2

Shapefiles do not support topology directly, as you have discovered. The data must first be imported in to a geodatabase, and specifically a feature dataset within that geodatabase. If you need to continue on in shapefile form, you'll have to export it back out once you're done topology checking and editing. The answer to the actual/original question is ...


0

if you use arcPy, create 2 rasters (need both to have same shape), new_raster and old_raster. Assume a value of zero is non-wetland and one is wetland in arcPy, convert both new_raster and old_raster to numpy arrays and: in_new_but_not_in_old = np.ones(new_raster.shape) * -9999 in_old_but_not_in_new = np.ones(new_raster.shape) * -9999 ...


0

QGIS print composer in > 2.6 can create georeferenced output as described in https://docs.qgis.org/2.6/en/docs/user_manual/print_composer/print_composer.html#creating-output If you need to export your layout as a georeferenced image (i.e., to load back inside QGIS), you need to enable this feature under the Composition tab. Check [checkbox] World file on ...


0

The work should be based on a good data model. You should make sure your objects adhere to national standards - if any. In Norway a lot of work has gone into standardizing graveyards. A PDF document is available describing this standard. It is unfortunately only available in Nrwegian, but Google translate should be able to help you out. From the foreword: ...


0

1) If you only want to plot your shapefile according to a particular field color, look at R: Spatial Cheatsheet, for example. library(rgdal) seccionesOk = readOGR(".", "secciones_censales_buenas") library(RColorBrewer) palette(brewer.pal(6, "YlOrRd")) plot(seccionesOk, col = plotrix:::rescale(seccionesOk$DESBDT, c(1, 6)), pch = 19) 2) If you want to use ...


0

When I first read your title, I thought you meant can two (or more) WMS share (that is use) the same shapefile to create multiple layers and services; the answer to that question is YES. I now read your question as meaning can a WMS provide to the user in a client (whether web based like some OpenLayers based page, or on the desktop like QGIS) a shapefile ...


0

Just add bounds part like below { "layers": { "world": { "src": "ne_50m_admin_0_countries_lakes/ne_50m_admin_0_countries_lakes.shp", "filter": ["gu_a3", "is", "PRI"] }, "states": { "src": "ne_50m_admin_1_states_provinces_lakes/ne_50m_admin_1_states_provinces_lakes.shp", "filter": { ...


1

By definition, WMS is a raster. Wikipedia has an overview and OGC has several versions of the specification (website appears to be down as of 13 May 2015). This is often a raster image of a vector datasource like a shapefile. WMS can support things like GetFeatureInfo which allows you to query attributes of the underlying vector data. If you want to ...


2

Update I'd just like to expand on my solution a bit here for anyone who may be having a similar issue. @neuhausr was dead on. I realized that setting the threshold to a low number, say 10 or 50 wasn't quite enough, while a higher number would compress it too much while leaving some areas untouched. Strangely enough, I found that if you compress it with the ...


3

That would be a huge dissolve. You could try first simplifying on the raster version, then converting that to vector and doing further simplification. http://docs.qgis.org/2.6/en/docs/training_manual/rasters/terrain_analysis.html#moderate-fa-simplifying-the-raster A couple ways to simplify the vectors via gdal: in ogr2ogr you can use the -simplify # command ...


0

Your approach is very interesting. The Editor class in PyShp is still a work in progress but I'll look into it further. Here's some code I just tested using your bounding box on a US roads shapefile. PyShp does export the SHX and the DBF files. Those are the minimum requirements of a shapefile. The SHP file is the geometry, the SHX file is a simple ...


0

If you have ogr2ogr modules modules, you can actually run the line given by John Mangual in Python. This link have same helpful answers regarding to that. How do I use ogr2ogr to convert a GML to shapefile in Python Also you can run line with os module as in this link FWTools ogr2ogr in Python


1

For this special purpose you can use the ogrtindex tool http://gdal.org/ogrtindex.html. The tool is made for creating footprints of vector datasets to be used as a tileindex file with MapServer http://www.mapserver.org/optimization/tileindex.html. Nonetheless, the tool makes exactly what you want even without MapServer. Another, more general option would be ...


0

This might be adaptable for your needs. If you don't mind calling the command line from python, you could do something like gdalwarp -cutline clip.shp -cl clip -crop_to_cutline input_raster output_raster_clipped.tif. -cwhere and -csql might be more appropriate gdalwarp options for selecting one of the four polygons for clipping.


1

Non-Python solution ogr2ogr -f "ESRI Shapefile" pr-roads.shp roadl_usa.shp -clipsrc -67.5 17.8 -65.1 18.6


0

One way to approach this would be using Rasters. Raster operations would be faster and more reliable in this case. Convert your vector layers to rasters using Raster -> Conversion -> Rasterize. (Start with a large pixel size to test your approach.) Subtract the rasters using Raster Calculator. convert the result into Vector using Raster -> Conversion -> ...


0

I was able to resolve this by doing a series of difference queries based on a few shape files I have. Still found not great automated way but it's done nonetheless.


1

Based on Kersten's answer, specifically the fact that it was readable/writeable as a dgn, I just changed the file extension of your sample file from .lul to .dgn and was able to add it to ArcMap normally with the add data button. It doesn't come in very cleanly (CAD files rarely do), but it's there. I suspect that, based on my searching which all pointed to ...


0

If JavaScript is an option for you, you can use the geocoding service of Google maps API. When you send a geocoding request, you get in response a GeocoderResults object. One if its properties is a geometry object, which in turn has a property called bounds. This is actually a LatLngBounds object, that represnts the area of the geocoding result. This ...


0

If would use ogr2ogr. Did you google it: https://www.google.com/search?q=bacth+shapefiles+to+tab&oq=bacth+shapefiles+to+tab&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8&gws_rd=ssl like https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/mapinfo-l/nt_3glZZClg ogr2ogr convert all shapefiles in a directory ...


3

This sounds like a job for ogr2ogr. ogrinfo reports your example to be readable/writable as DGN format. If you installed QGIS with the OSGeo4W installer you'll be able to access ogr2ogr from the OSGeo4W shell. The syntax for every file is something like this. Check the ogr2ogr documentation to tune the syntax to your specific needs (format, fields, ...


2

I think it might be because you do not add a layer to Mxd in code, because if it is in accordance with your code, the final layer will only exist in memory, and will not be automatically added to your Mxd, so when you keep Mxd when the layer will not be saved. Therefore, you need to add this section of code. # AddJoin ...


1

I always thought of the shapefile as an open format, however I cannot be 100% sure for its "openness". I also think that: a) the (rather justified) term "mostly open" can be translated as "publicly accessible" i.e. without any obvious restrictions to the accessibility of the information itself. Anybody can download a copy without any cost. b) moreover, a ...


2

Are there any parameters on the cities you want? GeoNames might be a good resource. Under their tools page there is a GeoNames csv file to shapefile converter. It might take a little bit of work and sifting through the data to get exactly what you want.


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Populated Places 1:10m (Natural Earth) Shapefile 7343 Cities Download from http://www.naturalearthdata.com/downloads/10m-cultural-vectors/ (Populated Places) Terms of Use http://www.naturalearthdata.com/about/terms-of-use/ No permission is needed to use Natural Earth. Crediting the authors is unnecessary. However, if you wish to cite the map ...


2

Must it be a shapefile? Google Maps offer something like you asked as a kml file (kmz in fact, which is just a zip containing a kml), at https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zMlf_4RO8x7E.kllT447wz1Ws&msa=0&ie=UTF8&t=m&ll=8.407168,165.9375&spn=130.849955,280.898438&z=2&source=embed


1

Very good points by @ChrisW. An alternative which may do what you seek is to first polygonize your line shapefile and then create your quadrants (I've included a simple example): I then used the Lines to polygons tool: Now you can use the Split features tool (from toolbar, Edit > Split features) which allows you to split your feature (line, polygon ...


2

I believe this page will answer your question: http://blog.safe.com/2011/05/fmeevangelist79/ It sounds like using the 'Joiner' transformer in your workflow will work. The crucial part you mention makes it sound like you don't actually want to merge the two, but rather add a relationship between the table and the shapefile.


2

There's probably a method to divide your shapefile to exactly what you specify (although I do not know how) but an alternative which should yield you with most areas divided by 2 ha is to: Create a grid using Vector grid (Vector > Research Tools > Vector grid) and set the relevant options: Clip your shapefile to your grid layer. Use Join by location ...


0

The ArcMap calculator breaks Python rules and accepts only if, not the elif. Just replace all the elif code with if instead. It is correct that the file must be a geodatabase and not a shapefile.


1

You may use QGIS and somebody had a question about that before. How to merge shape files with attributes from a python script in QGIS? There are also fiona and shapely python modules http://www.macwright.org/2012/10/31/gis-with-python-shapely-fiona.html Using GDAL/OGR modulues is another option http://gis-programming.com/?p=194


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There are many modules to read shapefiles in Python, older than ArcPy, look at the Python Package Index (PyPi): shapefiles. There are also many examples in GIS SE (search for [Python] Fiona, for example) All can read the geometry, the fields and the projections. The older is osgeo (GDAL/OGR), look at the Python GDAL/OGR Cookbook for example another ...


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I would recommend becoming familiar with the Python GDAL/OGR API to work with both vector and raster data. The easiest way to start using GDAL/OGR is via a python distribution such as python(x,y), Anaconda, or OSGeo4W. Further details on using GDAL for your specific tasks: Get Shapefile Fields and Types Get Projection Additionally, I would recommend ...


9

There are geospatial Python libraries besides ArcPy that will give you these abilities. Here are two examples: The Python Shapefile Library (pyshp) GeoPandas If you're interested in other libraries, this post on essential Python Geospatial libraries is a good place to look.


0

I created some videos that take you through the entire process of taking a shape file, bringing it into qgis, exporting the geometry data, converting it into Tableau format, and then loading it into Tableau. http://www.excelacom.com/resources/blog/tableau-geospatial-reporting-made-easy Let me know if this helps.


1

Actually shapefile is an open specification now. Also it "can" support multiple geometry types in one (while it is never just 1 file but a group of files that make a shapefile. which you would still need to either zip or pass more than 1 file anyway). Wiki shows most of the needed information to what you want to do. BUT I do not recommend it. Only open ...


0

If you want to solve this problem, then you'd have to take a look into UpdateCursor (there you will find some examples on how to apply it). that will allow to me to specify a shapefile What do you mean by this? You want your function (presumably you're making one inside your script) that takes in a shapefile?


2

Normalizing the data leads me to some missing ideas/points. Also, I think Excel can do everything you want for the "database" you contemplate. Hint: Use sheets, or multiple files and use variations of Lookup functions. Save into the useful file(s) for imports/lookups from QGIS I envision these discrete tables [or excel sheets], to start off your data ...


3

I would take DenaliHardtail's suggestion of using polygons to represent accurate sizes of the plots. This layer could have a table with Grave_ID, Grave_Type, Grave_Capacity, and Grave_Occupancy_Number. Then you could have a point layer with points overlying the corresponding grave polygons. Columns for the point layer table could be Person-ID, First_Name, ...



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