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1

If you only need to do the job once and there is no need to go to scripting then one simple way is to convert the data with OpenJUMP. Activate the charactes set selection from menu Customize - Options Open your dataset as Shift-JIS Save data back with Save as... and select UTF-8 charset


0

Your condition should be: if arcpy.Describe(shapefile).shapeType == "Polygon": ... # Copy Features


1

An idea is: Use the lidar data to classify ground and non-ground points. Then, build a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) from the ground points. Here is a way of doing it. Use the RGB values from the aerial images to color code the lidar point cloud. Here are examples showing how this can be done. Now, it is possible to display the DEM and the color-coded ...


0

I found admin levels with all subunits for each continent and I combined them using QGIS. Here is the geojson file if you find it useful. https://gist.github.com/cmunns/76fb72646a68202e6bde


1

ogr2ogr man page says that this should work ogr2ogr --config SHAPE_ENCODING Shift_JIS japan_ver72_utf8.shp -lco ENCODING=UTF-8 Have you already tried it ? (Probably needs linux version of ogr2ogr)


2

You can simply use join. Import your CSV into qgis and mark 'no geometry' to get a non-spatial data table. Open your shape files properties and choose the 'joins' tab. Add a new join with the '+' sign on the bottom-left, and define the Primary and foriegn Key fields. You can also define which fields to join. That is it. In case of mismatch, rows won't be ...


2

Step 1: get the coordinates in the csv to points. You'll first need to determine, if possible, the coordinate system used. You say lat/lon, so right away it should be a Geographic Coordinate System. Frequently it will be GCS WGS84, but there are other datums out there and it's best to be sure. Once you have that info you can use Add Delimited Text Layer and ...


0

This operation is called a "Spatial Join". You can use the "Join Attributes by Location" tool in QGIS.


1

I would use the 'Point sampling tool' plugin in QGIS. Check the bottom of How do I use the field-calculator in QGIS to return the name of a country from a different shapefile?


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I think what you want to do is create a CSV for the output, which in QGIS there are options on how to export the geometry. Right-click the layer Choose Save As Choose Format - CSV now notice the Layer Options settings > GEOMETRY do you want your geometry stored as WKT, XY's, etc.? In my example, I turned zip code polygon shapefiles into CSV using WKT. ...


0

You want to use "merge" with the all = TRUE argument. However, be very careful if you want to keep the relationship between the data slot and the rest of the slots in the spatial object. You could take an approach where the external data is not actually joined to the spatial objects data slot but queried during whatever analysis is being applied. This is ...


4

It seems that a Shapefile is indeed an open specification. As Vince suggested, the "mostly" comment should be verified with who-ever written it. Here are some sources: Start with ESRI documentation stating that: This document also provides all the technical information necessary for writing a computer program to create shapefiles without the use ...


0

Try this site from OpenStreetMapData.com: http://openstreetmapdata.com/data/coastlines Or even Natural Earth data has coastlines: http://www.naturalearthdata.com/downloads/50m-physical-vectors/


0

You can easily load Shapefiles into dashDB using the user interface. Instructions here: https://www-01.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/SS6NHC/com.ibm.swg.im.dashdb.doc/learn_how/loaddata_gsdata.html


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Note: PostNL has been assigned by the Dutch government to carry out the UPD (Universele Postdienst, Dutch for Universal Postal Service). This means that PostNL has to deliver mail throughout the Netherlands, five days a week (Tuesday through Saturday), and have enough mailboxes and post offices available for posting mail. ACM is charged with ...


0

As the data owner cannot change the field types, I have used ogr2ogr and a -sql select statement to exclude the field that is causing problems. As the field, LENGTH, is derived data, then it shows up in QGIS anyway so I was ok to omit it. My new code is as follows; ogr2ogr.exe -f PostgreSQL PG:"dbname=postgis host=localhost user=username ...


0

thanks all for the reply, @ John -- i first started searching on the local municipal corporation websites and got some of the maps in jpeg format in which ward boundaries were marked, but not all of the municipal boundaries provide these maps.I have found ward map jpeg files for some cities of Andhra Pradesh, India. Actually i need ward boundaries of all ...


0

ogr2ogr will (sort of) do it. Scroll down to "How do I translate a mixed geometry file to shapefile format?" % ogr2ogr out_point.shp mixed.kml -where 'ogr_geometry = "POINT"' % ogr2ogr out_line.shp mixed.kml -where 'ogr_geometry = "LINESTRING"' % ogr2ogr out_poly.shp mixed.kml -where 'ogr_geometry = "POLYGON"' This stack answer covers it as well. ...


2

You can use the Feature Vertices to Points tool with BOTH_ENDs option checked, on your lines, that will give you start/end points of the lines. Then Add XY Coordinates to populate the resultant points with Lat / Long values. Another way to go about your workflow.


2

Did you take a look at any those lines to see what might be going on? Their start and end points may actually be in the same place, if they were drawn incorrectly. Select one of them and zoom to it. If it shows up as a point, that's why the XY coordinates of the start and end points are the same. Depending on the coordinate system you're using, it's also ...


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Answer can be found from the official specification http://www.esri.com/library/whitepapers/pdfs/shapefile.pdf. All the non-Null shapes in a shapefile are required to be of the same shape type. The values for shape type are as follows: Value Shape Type 0 Null Shape 1 ...


8

A shapefile does not support mixed geometry. A shapefile either consists of points, polylines or polygons, but not more than one. See this article for more: Shapefiles


1

Directly loading KML data is not yet possible with dashDB. But you can load GML. See e.g. https://www-01.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/#!/SS6NHC/com.ibm.db2.luw.spatial.topics.doc/doc/db2sb169.html%23db2sb-gen168__fun-constr-geom If you have Esri ArcGIS tooling you can load KML data and store it into dashDB geometry columns.


0

This is actually an issue with floating point calculation where in binary computers can't see recurring numbers and therefore can't round. It doesn't matter if you're in a billion dollar ArcGIS development environment or QGIS world, the issue is that you are in binary base2.


1

You probably want to write a script, but starting point could be to take a list of the layers with ogrinfo: ogrinfo kml_samples.kml INFO: Open of `kml_samples.kml' using driver `LIBKML' successful. 1: Placemarks 2: Styles and Markup 3: Highlighted Icon 4: Ground Overlays 5: Screen Overlays 6: Paths 7: Polygons 8: Google Campus 9: Extruded Polygon 10: ...


0

Can you try the converting the data in QGIS? or any other GIS software? this way you can make sure the problem really lies with ArcGIS rather than your data, and you have the shapefile to boot.


0

Just clean your spreadsheet. Convert to table and do the steps you just did. You don't need to convert to MS Access if you do it right. You can follow this workflow like this question I answered not so long ago: http://gis.stackexchange.com/a/135684/34877


1

You should define the trace to be selected, rather than being drawn. That is through the analysis> analysis options> results menus of the Utility Network Analysis toolbar (see image). After that re-compute the trace, and export it regularly.


1

Usually you would ask the features to give you their schema using: SimpleFeatureType schema = collection.getSchema(); You can then use that to generate the Oracle schema to write the data into.


1

If the QGIS dissolve tool fails, you can use a dissolve tool from the Processing framework (e.g. SAGA or GRASS) instead.


6

You may have some "unnecessary" files being created but ArcMap requires 3 files at a minimum for a shapefile to be usable. The absolute minimum is: SHP, SHX and DBF. The PRJ is also very helpful because it defines what coordinates system your shapefile is in. Some of the others are related to spatial features and are not strictly necessary, but ArcMap ...


3

That's just the way shapefiles are. Each of those extra files contains data that is pertinent to how the shapefile is read by the GIS software. For example the .prj file stores the projection information for the shapefile, if you delete it the GIS software will see your shapefile as unprojected. Another is the .dbf file - this stores all the attribute ...


1

I wrote this script to perform the same functionality as the split tool. If you're splitting a large feature class you may want to change the copy features for something else. The feature class I split was small. import arcpy, os arcpy.env.workspace = "" list = [] #Input the values you would normally split by or populate this using another method input = ...


1

If the output parameter is a directory instead of a file name, ogr2ogr will automatically convert all geometry types into separate shapefiles: ogr2ogr out_dir d:\incoming\nhn_09AA001_1_0.gml Unfortunately for the OP this doesn't work for KML, but it does for some of the other multiple geometry type formats like ArcInfo Coverages and GML. Posting here ...


3

Here's a simple reproducible example. I give 2 approaches, one using mosaic/merge and another that just does the initial rasterize at the total extent of all shapefiles combined. The results are the same. Added based on Jeffrey Evans comment: You also need to consider what to do when you have overlapping polygons. If you want to apply a function (e.g. sum, ...


0

Cross Tabulate Statistics might work for you if you are using ArcMap 10+ and want Chi-square and/or Kappa statsCrossTabulateStatistics


0

A Pearson, Kendall or Spearman correlation (R) between two nominal variables is nonsensical. You want to explore techniques such as contingency analysis (Phi coefficient, Cramér's V, Persons C, Kappa, ...), factor analysis, canonical correspondence analysis or perhaps something in the family of Jaccard's similarity statistics. If you put one variable (y) in ...


2

Note that 'level of detail' is a relative term. They may show the same information, ie counties, but level of detail also applies to the lines that make up the boundaries. One might use a hundred points to outline a county, and the other might use a couple thousand. Simplify/Generalize are what you use on the larger to bring them more in line, but depending ...


-2

I would use the Simplify tool to reduce the numbers of Vertices. I have come across this too many times.


5

QGIS has a good (in my opinion) mechanism for deciding what to do with input layers that have no coordinate system specification. You can choose one of three ways for QGIS to behave: Always prompt for the correct CRS Always assume that the current project CRS is correct for the input layer Always use a certain default CRS that you choose You can set ...


3

The labels are just a styling that you see in QGIS. Their existence let alone position and other parameters are not saved with the shapefile. You need to look at labelling in Mapbox entirely separate from QGIS. Here are some links to documentation to help you: https://www.mapbox.com/blog/placing-labels/ ...


0

I know we use a private company called PetroSwell Maps & Data for Texas well and pipeline data. www.petroswell.com, they have pretty good prices and deliver the data really quickly.


0

Look in the Attribute Table of the DXF - Polygon layer. It is sometimes a PolygonZ Shape or something like that. If this is the case use the Feature Class to Feature Class Tool to copy it to a SHP file. You'll need to set the 'Output has Z Values' Environment Variable when you run the tool:


0

I assume you are using TerraSync to collect your data. In that case, go to Data>File Manager> select the file you want to transfer>Options>Write data to Shape. Connect your handheld to your desktop and transfer shapefiles via file explorer.


1

Patrick you're on the right track. This is something I've given some thought to so I'll offer some reactions and feedback. Common, Recognized Coordinate Systems First--it's perfectly fine to start the interment dataset in Excel. My guess is you have some "army" of students, genealogy enthusiasts, and possibly some cemetery employees building the point data ...


0

I think ArcGIS and ArcGIS online can handle all of that itself, but it's perhaps one of the more pricey software solutions. ArcGIS will let you import any image of the site and georeference it, so you may be able to avoid costly drone procedures. You can draw features very easily on top of images. You can then link tables with some features to add ...


8

There is actually an ArcGIS tool specifically for this task: Convert Time Field. You don't even need to use the Field Calculator. Just specify the format of the source date/time field and your desired output format and the tool will create a new field and populate it with the converted values. It can be used for converting dates, times, or a combination of ...


0

FIDs are unique to a feature in a datastore. Thus you shouldn't be setting the FID yourself, especially not when dealing with a shapefile where they are hard coded. The correct answer if you need to refer to the same feature in different datastores is to provide your own attribute that you control which will be the same in each place that you store or ...


2

The file utility is able to guess the encoding of a text file. Use ogr2ogr for a conversion that preserves the original encoding if there is no .cpg file: ogr2ogr -f CSV file.csv file.dbf file file.csv Example output: file.csv: ISO-8859 text I have tested it with two of the most frequent encodings, UTF-8 and latin1. Works out of the box in Ubuntu, not ...



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