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17

Google use a self-developed tool called Atlas to maintain geodata. In this video from Google I/O 2013 you see how Atlas works (Atlas starts at 7:30 - but it is interesting to see the whole video).


12

Disclaimer: Developer on the project, and hardcore advocate, but it is pretty awesome sooo... :) A lot of Arc* users tend to fit in well with QGIS. It provides the same kind of features, if not more in some areas. Provides good printing options. Can open pretty much any format under the sun. QGIS also has a progressing framework that can interface with ...


12

Commercial: FME Desktop " ability to take a point cloud that has no color information on it, and overlay it into an orthophoto to produce a colorized point cloud" http://blog.safe.com/2012/01/beating-lidar-into-submission-with-fme-2012/ LP360 Add-on to ArcGIS http://www.qcoherent.com/products/index.html LP360 for ArcGIS™ (Basic, Standard and Advanced) ...


12

MapInfo would definitely do what you'd like it to do. However, in my opinion, the open source options have far surpassed the capabilities of MapInfo. Specifically, I suggest you look into QGIS. It can do everything MapInfo can do and more. I've never used it for retail business and service planning, but there are plenty of people on this site who could ...


9

You didn't specifically ask about any open source tools or data in your original post, but OpenStreetMap has a global web map that is as good as the ones from Google or Bing. Because it is open source, there are lots of great resources explaining how they manage their data and render their map. If you want to create a worldwide map like Google or Bing, you ...


8

As a freelance GIS Consultant, I am confident that you can do almost everything you need using Open Source Software. If you can avoid borrowing a lot of money for software licences as you set up your business, it will massively help your cash flow. Then, when your business grows, you can show your appreciation to the Open Source Community by making a ...


8

FUSION/LDV is a powerful and solid open source option developed by the USDA Forest Service to analyze and visualize LiDAR data. General information about FUSION can be found here: Overview of FUSION features: Generates DEMs from point data Produces bare earth surfaces from unfiltered points Displays image data for background reference Subsamples large ...


7

Erdas used to work together wih ESRI, but now it is ENVI that has joint its forces. I would therefore use ENVI for the compatibility. But if you are looking for an good open source solution, I recommend Orfeo Toolbox (http://orfeo-toolbox.org/otb/ ). You can either use the library, the command line application or a complete GUI (called Monteverdi). ...


6

You've really kind of answered your own question here, but I'll elaborate for the purposes of canonism. I'll provide you with some ideas based off of specific skills that I often see requested at the GIS jobs clearinghouse. You can pretty much go two separate routes here (or both simultaneously) and both are pretty wide open: Building your analysis ...


5

Yes - is the short answer. I think you will need NumPy and SciPy as part of your Python solution. Have a look at the scipy.ndimage module when it comes to calculating means (are these zonal means?) as this will be a lot quicker than doing it with just NumPy. Also, by using the Python multiprocessing module, you will get a significant speed gain. ...


4

There's an Open Source project especially to read and write LiDAR (and any other source of pointcloud data) format. This library, called PDAL is located at http://www.pointcloud.org/ I've seen demo using OpenLayers reading data from a PDAL source, but can't locate it anymore. Your best bet would be to ask on the mailing-list over there. Edit Boundless ...


4

I've used SAGA-GIS for identifying tree canopy and creating DSM's from Lidar data. I was very impressed. SAGA seems to be an all around Vector/Rastor/Point Cloud processing tool. It is free and open source. It comes as 32-bit or 64-bit. It does have some scripting capabilities if you build the source code yourself with Python Bindings, but all the tools ...


4

I would recommend using QGIS, using GDAL Tools to create contours (free), see link below. http://planet.qgis.org/planet/tag/dem/ You can also use QGIS to create other raster terrain layers (e.g. shadded relief, slope, aspect...etc), see link below. ...


4

Take a look at OSM Buildings. It's works with Leaflet and Openlayers. Here you'll find a short introduction of a implementation with building data stored in PostGIS. There also exist some 3D-Mapping libraries based on WebGL: OpenWebGlobe Cesium WebGL Earth


4

While not technically an answer to your question, "Does an Open Source equivalent ... exist?," this is a basis for a solution. The OGC is working on a new spec for a storage container, being voted on right now (by Jan 19), with these types of workflows, especially mobile, in mind: GeoPackage. It is similar to and originally based upon Spatialite, a ...


3

As mentioned you and other answers have already surmised, aside from acquiring customers, learning their needs, etc, etc, acquiring the necessary data to deliver useful analysis to your customers may be one of your most challenging efforts. From a business perspective, though, the most valuable thing that you have to offer is your service and knowledge of ...


3

Here are some case studies for City Engine. On the main City Engine website it goes into detail about how it can be used and what features are supported that might give it an advantage over the tools you specify in your question.


3

For specific remote sensing tasks you could check out BEAM. If you are not afraid of command line, I would suggest a combination of GRASS (for storage and datahandling and analysis), QGIS(for visualization) and GDAL/OGR and pktools (for analysis). All these are open-source. A very good instructional site is here.


3

Your best bet is QGIS for Android: http://www.opengis.ch/2012/01/31/qgis-on-android-gets-gps-support/ but I'm unsure about its current status concerning tracking and sync. Here's an example video with a Windows tablet with working tracking and sync: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WevRW4tbzs This short video show how Quantum GIS can be used to do live ...


3

As far as open source, check out Open Data Kit (ODK). I've used it for large data collection projects (10,000+ submissions at this point) and it's fairly easy to get set up on Postgres/Postgis for enterprise wide collection with the Aggregate component. Limitations include currently Android only, and not a mapping interface. Form development is based on the ...


3

The best answer to this is no, unfortunately. I've looked fairly long for a perfect mobile data collection app, and would definitely prefer a web-based one for administration. As @flippinGeo says, ODK is great. But it is not an integrated product (i.e., forms are set up in one area, aggregation is done in another, and the app is Android only). It works ...


3

I have produced good quality A0 maps from both ArcGIS and QGIS. Some GIS licence I have seen do limit the size of plot depending on licence but not those two and there will be pleny of other free/low cost options to explore such as Idrisi, SAGA etc. On this note you may want to consider something like Mapnik or other renderer. It is not down to the GIS ...


2

Try routeXL I'm not sure how many nodes you can max out on though. Here's an example of a 12 city output To add destinations, find them in the search bar and press enter. click on the Address drop down to change/modify the addresses you just added Click on find route for it to compute it HEre's a screenshot of a run I did:


2

You can find a shapefile (vector) for countries as of 2010 from http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu. It think that it would be easier to change the symbology of a vector file than deal with a raster. Arcmap will project on the fly and you can set the map to a winkel projection (projected->world or world-sphere->winkel).


2

Manifold is a good one and its not expensive. Its a good choice if you dont want to spend a lot of money in ESRI products and are not willing to go in open-source. In my opinion, its more complete than MapInfo, and less expensive but you should know that no product is perfect. I hope this answer is complete enough. If you want to have more details visite ...


2

Look at A Practical Guide to Geostatistical Mapping, it uses R, SAGA and Google Earth or A Practical Guide to Geostatistical Mapping of Environmental Variables with R and Saga: With R, you can do what you want: R only : Geostatistics packages on CRAN, A minimal Introduction to geostatictics with R/gstats, Analyzing Spatial Data with R: Worked example: ...


2

ImageMagick supports: Large image support: read, process, or write mega-, giga-, or tera-pixel image sizes. command --line will the most efficient way to do this: (via -layers method) merge As 'flatten' method but merging all the given image layers to create a new layer image just large enough to hold all the image without clipping or extra ...


2

As disclosure, I am SVP Marketing at Alteryx. Just FYI, we recently lowered prices for the desktop versions and also made them public: ...so you might want to look at most recent pricing before making a decision, and possibly talk to someone here. Shoot me an email if you want to speak to someone here further about the prices.


2

You can't in one step. It's a two step procedure. BUT you can simulate the behaviour by creating your buffer as a subquerry. Afterwards you 'select' the buffer area that intersects with your land polygon eg: WITH buffer AS (select st_buffer(point.geom,500000) as geom from data.point_table) SELECT ST_Intersection(buffer.geom,land.geom) from ...


2

You could try using a PostGIS database with topology data type and functions. QGIS also has some topology functionality built in - this could be used if you're looking to have a desktop front end to your platform.



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