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25

The OSGeo is a repository for the open source GIS community. There are a few applications highlighted here that may suite your needs. Quantum GIS (QGIS) - QGIS can handle a variety of vector and raster GIS data sets. The application interface is intuitive, and has a similar look and feel like ESRI ArcMap. The application may also be installed on a ...


14

In a nutshell: Start with QGIS. There are several Free and Open Source tools for geospatial statistics. QGIS (Quantum GIS) There are several spatial statistics plugins in Quantum GIS, such as fTools: Tools for vector data analysis and management Zonal Statistics: Extended zonal statistics and report generation manageR: Interface to the R statistical ...


12

GeoDa is free, cross-platform software designed for dynamic visualization, exploratory spatial data analysis, and spatial statistics. It has been around for almost 15 years (starting as an ArcView 3.x extension, it was recoded to be independent of ArcView after ESRI abandoned the old AV architecture). It is associated with an illustrious group of GIS ...


12

Based on your requirements, you may need a GIS stack: server, database, presentation, and then the analysis tools. I'd recommend GeoServer (http://www.geoserver.org) for server, PostgreSQL with PostGIS extension for database (http://postgis.net). This combination can enable easy distributed authoring/analysis and publishing using WFS, WPS, and WMS, which ...


11

Starrynight: http://www.starrynight.com/ It's a very nice software, it displays other planets and the universe. I found this paper too: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2005/pdf/2213.pdf


11

I am working at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay Ontario. I have created the same type of facility in my university last year, with the same needs. I have chosen to use QGIS with a PostGIS database. We do have educational licenses of ArcGIS and PCI for teaching purposes, but I am trying to stay away from all of that. If you have any other questions, or ...


9

That is SonarWave Lite by Tekmap. It's free and can be downloaded from the preceding link if you have some SONAR data lying around that you want to play with. The company who makes it also appears to make heavy use of GRASS and GDAL - so you can consider SonarWave Lite to be GIS-based, but for a very specific application. EDIT: I looked a bit more into ...


9

Desktop For many users, GIS means ESRI ArcGIS. While expensive in a commercial setting, they have rather generous educational licensing, including the provision of free copies to educators for distribution to students, one per licensed seat per year. I would advise at least ticking this box; I don't think people who learned GIS in other ways are less ...


8

Unfortunately it's impossible to say how many people use QGIS. Tim Sutton regularly creates download stats for Windows stand-alone downloads: Last December, Gary Sherman followed a different approach and counted the number of unique IP addresses accessing the plugin repository and found: 35,603 unique IP addresses of users that accessed the ...


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If you already have an ArcGIS Desktop license, you can develop for ArcGIS Desktop applications already using one of the ArcObjects SDKs (included on the ArcGIS Desktop installation media). As for an IDE, since you are interested in using C#/.NET, I'd recommend the free Visual Studio C# Express Edition. If you need an ArcGIS Desktop license, you can request ...


7

I work for a small university research center myself. The center has been around for over 20 years now, I've only been here about one year. Over the years, they have built relationships with major software vendors in the industry that have resulted in licensing agreements which offer, for the most part, free and unrestricted use of the vendor's software ...


6

There are a few companies offering hosted solutions. A few that come to mind are Arc2Cloud, GeoIQ, WeoGeo, etc. Although some of them do not list this on their site, you can contact them and find out more about it. Personally, I have not used them directly and I prefer another route: using my own gis stack in the cloud. You can use ArcGIS ...


6

I'll try to analyze your use cases from a QGIS perspective: Software that allows me to drive a specific route and store that as a working model. There is a GPS Tool for live tracking of GPS devices. But I guess you could go with the simpler version of loading the recorded GPX files into QGIS after collection. Download some GPS/County information to ...


6

This paper by Koichi Yagi shows how the accelerometer in a smart phone can be used to measure roughness. Update Whatever software you end up using, I think it needs the ability to manage road condition surveys. An important role of pavement management is prioritizing road repairs and deciding when to re-surface instead of repair. I'd like the road in ...


6

As for "Are there specific software packages for handling non earth data/coordinate systems?" there is NAIF SPICE provided by JPL. This has very accurate coordinate systems etc to cover surfaces of nearly all interesting celestial bodies as well as their relative positions and motions. It's not very closely tied to GIS, as techniques to gather the data and ...


6

See also GRASS and R integration: http://grass.osgeo.org/wiki/R_statistics For example boxplots: ... or decision trees (rpart example):


5

As others have said in comments, apparent detail when Zooming In has little or nothing to do with the software and everything to do with the data. Once you have the right data for your described purpose you can use just about anything to cut it up and print it. For imagery it doesn't even have to be "GIS" software, so long as it's an a standard format like ...


5

Hossein, combining spatial maps with databases is the heart of GIS. Practically any GIS will allow you to do both of those things in a variety of ways - though a desktop interface, programatically, served remotely, etc. Here is an excellent list of free and open source desktop GIS packages. Quantum GIS, with a powerful collection of tool and an easy-to-use ...


5

Don't know about your specific GPS, but we use DNR Garmin with many different Garmin units. You can download tracks, waypoints and routes and save them in a variety of file formats in both projected and unprojected coordinates. (Edited out a duplicate link due to improper pasting) EDIT DNR Garmin is limited to Windows operating systems. You might want ...


5

Here's one possible solution: Digitize the features in QGIS (which is free software) Use SQL Server 2008 Spatial Tools (free), Shape2SQL in particular, to import your resulting shapefile(s) you created in QGIS into SQL Server Some Googling or searching on this site will get you links to other QGIS tutorials on digitizing and just using QGIS in general.


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ArcGIS has Spatial Statistics Toolbox for statical information. it analyze spatial distributions, patterns, processes, and relationships. Spatial statistics allow you to: Summarize the key characteristics of a distribution. Identify statistically significant spatial clusters (hot spots/cold spots) and spatial outliers. Assess overall patterns of ...


5

How about GeoDjango ? It might be overkill for what you want to do but it seems to meet the criteria you are looking for. It's a python driven web framework that incorporates a lot great GIS projects like, gdal/ogr, OpenLayers, and supports the use of geodatabases including postgis/postgres. I've been experimenting with it off and on for a few months and ...


4

A GIS desktop and/or web solution would help you answer these question. you could use something like QGIS or GeoServer as a desktop or web solution. to get accurate county road data you could see if the county has a GIS department to obtain data. If not most States have a open clearinghouse GIS web site to download data or you could possible get data from ...


4

Good accounts of algorithms in 2 and 3 dimensions appear in the classic text by Preparata & Shamos. Algorithms used in GIS are a specialty of Hanan Samet, who has published several books on the subject. Higher-dimensional searches are usually assisted or sped up by means of preliminary data mining, clustering, or dimension-reducing techniques. This is ...


4

The classic (paleogeographer) answer is to use a K-D tree to store the data in (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kd-tree). These work by roughly halving the data in to two partitions in each dimension in turn as you move down the tree. The advantage of them is that as you find the nearest item you can also create a list of nearest items as you go for no ...


4

Looks like a custom function (do view-source on it). You'll need jQuery to use it: $(function(){ // Loop through all the sets of before and after pics $(".beforeafter").each(function(){ // Set the container's size to the size of the image ...


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Calculating NPP from EO data is an open research question. I will assume we talk of the land surface here, by the way. A simple and widely used way of calculating NPP is to use what is called a Production Efficiency Model, that converts incoming radiation into gross primary productivity and then subtracts respiration costs to arrive at NPP. There are many ...


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GeoNetwork may be worth a look: http://www.osgeo.org/geonetwork GeoNetwork opensource is a catalog application to manage spatially referenced resources. It provides powerful metadata editing and search functions as well as an embedded interactive web map viewer. GeoNetwork opensource has been developed to connect spatial information communities and their ...


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For raster formats, I think the Esri ASCII Grid format is most the commonly supported format across GIS software. Since it is ASCII, it is portable to read anywhere, even in a text editor. Many closed and open-source software (particularly recently developed) generally use GDAL, which has a native AAIGrid driver. The two drawbacks are the file size (but it ...


4

There are few interesting packages from the Spatial Data Mining and Visual Analytics Lab, especially: EntroMap: Detecting Spatially Varying Multivariate Relationships VIS-STAMP: A Visualization System for Space-Time and Multivariate Patterns SOMVIS: Multivariate Mapping and Visualization S4 research group also has few useful tools, especially: ...



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