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5

It seems that the arcpy syntax can be used directly in raster calculator. Therefore the properties of this page can be used. For instance Con("raster" > "raster".mean, 1, 0) works. Other examples : minimum, maximum, mean, meanCellHeight, meanCellWidth, extent.XMin, extent.YMax, etc


4

most of the tool can be replaced with Map algebra, but the syntax of pick makes it easy to use. I've used it for mosaicking with multiple masks (you have a set of classification, and you want to combine them based on geographical stratification.) It is also quite usefull in combination of the local toolset. For example, one of those tools can find the ...


3

I was curious so I did a small test to see if the two programs perform the same function. The quick answer is yes and no. Let's have a look- Random set of 100 points with a random weight value: Setup KDE in ArcMap 10.2.1: Setup KDE in qGIS 2.0.1: Compare the results. I adjusted the symbology so that the discrete values were equal interval, 6 ...


3

Pick is the map algebra analog of a "case" or "switch" statement. Like them it is not indispensable but it can be convenient (and more efficient than deeply nested binary logical operators). Notable among the uses to which I have put this operation is its ability to implement a cellular automaton. Another handy use is random selection of rasters. A ...


3

If your bathymetric data are current in the form of survey points then you should interpolate them onto a raster grid of the same resolution and extent as your LiDAR data. There are several methods for interpolating these points available in ArcGIS such as splining, IDW and kriging. The most appropriate method to use will depend on your data characteristics ...


2

Menno's answer will work but it will work but it will always round down. For example, 99.99999 becomes 99. This function in the raster calculator or map algebra tool will do logical rounding. Int(yourraster + 0.5). This way 99.99999 becomes 100 and and 99.49999 becomes 99.


2

From the fact that you plan to use focal statistics I infer that you must be able to use the spatial analyst extension. In the spatial analyst toolbox there is a tool Int in the Math toolset which converts a floating point raster to an integer raster.


1

you could automate this with a loop in Python. Arcpy uses "lazy computing, so this will be evaluated when you save. import arcpy from arcpy.sa import * imList = glob.glob("your_path/*.jpg") outraster = raster(imList[0]) i=0 for im in imList: if i>0: outraster += raster(im) i+=1 outraster.save("outputname")


1

Straightforward no, but a not too hard block of Python code might help you out. First, make sure you have added a new field in the Red Polygon attribute table and call it something like "field_count". The code is this: uc = arcpy.UpdateCursor(redPolys) yellowLyr = arcpy.MakeFeatureLayer_management(yellowPolys) for row in uc: geometry = ...



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