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What you're looking for is the focal statistics function in your spatial analyst toolbox. You find the documentation of the function in your ArcGIS desktop help, or under this link. Focal statistics will go through your grid using the radius or neighbourhood you've defined and will then apply the selected statistics to each cell. I would recommend using ...


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No, the values do not correspond to a probability but rather a confidence region. The 14 values are, a rather arbitrary, set of nominal representations of each of the predefined confidence regions. Analogously, think of a linear regression line with a set of confidence envelopes, with each incremental envelope indicating less certainty in the estimate. In ...


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I'll go out on a limb here and link this page: ESRI FAQ Question Why does the data bit depth increase when a raster is projected, rotated, or >clipped? Answer Pixel depth is increased to provide the space to store 'nodata' values. This allows changes, such as a shift or a mask, to be applied to the raster. Pixels within the new raster's ...


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There is no need to define the workspace if you are explicitly defining the variable paths. Additionally, you are formatting the paths incorrectly--try using r'C:\path\to\your\data'. I would recommend writing the output raster to .tif or .img format. As your script is currently configured, it is trying to output a grid format raster. This is how I would ...


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Go to ArcToolbox -> Spatial Analyst Tools -> Map Algebra -> Raster Calculator In the raster calculator, you can either write SetNull("raster_name"<0.92, "raster_name"). Or Double click SetNull from the menu under Conditional menu, then double click the raster layer from raster layer listed in the Table of content from inside raster calculator ...


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If the question is still actual, I use pretty often this source: http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.2/index.html#/na/00qn0000001p000000/ (extensions---spatial analyst). Hope, it may be helpful for you as well.


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As @FelixIP said, use Cell Statistics. You'll need the Spatial Analyst license, however. Alternatively, if you don't have access to Spatial Analyst, and you're familiar with python, you could use arcpy. What I would do is: Loop through each raster and convert them to numpy arrays using RasterToNumpyArray. As you're looping through the rasters, store ...


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Do some experimenting with the Raster Calculator. You can call Con or other conditional functions from within the raster calculator, or better yet the python interpreter (if you're comfortable with that). You will probably want to create an output for each scenario that you are interested in comparing. For example if you want to identify areas that were ...


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It seems, that I found a solution. The key is to use "Path distance" tool, where first parameter, Input raster or feature source data, is raster of city and second parameter, Input cost raster, is roads raster, where each value has assigned time needed to pass one meter. Roads raster was created in following way: add field "time" to attribute table of ...


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You can calculate the NDWI using basic raster calculator in arcmap. You need to use Landsat bands 3 and 5 (Landsat 8 OLI), and simply calculate a new raster with an algebraic expression: (Band 3 - Band 5)/(Band 3 + Band 5) You should preferably use images corrected to TOA. In this example I have bands 3 and 5 The result is a raster with values between -...


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Hi You can see this paper: A novel method for detecting and counting overlapping tracks in SSNTD by image processing techniques 10.1016/j.radmeas.2016.04.009



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