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The help for this tool does not explicitly state there is a limit but in a project about a year ago I was feeding it folders with many thousands of rasters and the performance was very poor. What I eventually did was SUM the rasters in batches of 100 then SUMMED the batched values. This ran much quicker and was easily implemented with a bit of looping in ...


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The value of LicStat is licStat esriLicenseCheckedOut The Line result = (IGeoProcessorResult)gp.Execute("MLClassify ", parameters, null); is throwing the non-helpful error As you said ---ArcGis 10 way is different and as that tool is a python script I'm not sure you can use it that way.--- what is its solution?, what should i do now?


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To answer your question directly, crime obviously follows population, just like disease or any other human "event" you might be measuring. To directly compare you could normalise both population and crime figures to z-scores, and classify each region as HH, LL, HL, LH, or come up with a way to combine the figures, but I think to answer your question you need ...


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i'm probably confused, but it seems writing a raster to 'd:/tmp' is still writing to disk? therefore, in the loop 'd:/tmp' is not defined and an error is encountered when the process attempts to find the raster in the same directory as the script. you might try 'in_memory/bin1' and 'in_memory/bin2' instead of specifying a path as noted in the accepted ...


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in your first loop, you create rasters called tmpX. The second line is useless and the third line is a raster object that you overwrite at each loop. You should use the name tmpX in your second loop, instead of binX.


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Error 000539 indicates that an invalid calculation has been attempted: Arcgis 10.0 Resource Center Link Based on what @Ray commented below the question, the error was caused by the use of the Make Raster Layer tool. Since this tool creates a temporary raster for use in calculations, it's likely that the necessary raster already existed as an output from ...


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I'm not sure how to manage your changing neighborhood size, but here is already an answer. Iterate Rasters runs the same tool/chain of tools for a series of datasets in the specified workspace, so it's not going to do what you need. If you want to reuse the output of the model as input a number of times, you should do the following: Right-click the input ...


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Three band images are generally not sufficient for high quality land cover classifications. Usually at least near infrared band is required. When I was classifying one image that had four bands (r,g,b,nir) I also calculated NDVI and included it in classification. As you probably don't have nir band you could add more information for the classification using ...


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Do you have access to the point cloud from the imagery? In mosaicing the images from the drone, depending on software, you can export a 3D point cloud. You then can use LASTools to classify the ground points and then convert to a DEM.


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I wanted to write a comment, but i don´t have points enough. I think that what you need is to do a classification by texture. Last week i was on a seminar where the aim was to classify images of high resolution with texture and variograms (geostatistics). you can read this: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0098300499001181 atkinson & ...


1

If you have the Spatial Analyst extension, it sounds like you may be able to make use of the Path Distance tool. You will need an elevation raster to serve as input. The tool will output a raster with a value in each cell that represents the shortest distance to one of your points from that cell, taking the topography into account in its calculations. Of ...



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