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The best way is to use viewshed (observer point does not seem necessary based on you question, except if you want to know which spire can see which WTG). First you determine the locations where you could see your WTG (viewshed of the spires), then you use "extract multivalue to point" to transfer this information from the resulting raster to each WTG point. ...


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Watershed straight edge is usually clear indication of processing extent being not large enough. I guess that dams extent affected result shown. Output of watershed tool http://resources.arcgis.com/EN/HELP/MAIN/10.2/index.html#/Watershed/009z00000059000000/ depends on correct value of extent. It is a good idea to set your extent to DEM extent, set cellsize ...


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The ArcGIS help for many tools can usually point you towards potential culprits of errors. The error in your case mentions environment mask. The mask help states the following: If the analysis mask is a feature dataset, it will internally be converted to a raster on execution. For this reason, you should take care to ensure that the Cell Size and ...


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You can use map algebra syntax in Python, similar to the Raster Calculator: import arcview, arcpy from arcpy.sa import * arcpy.CheckOutExtension("Spatial") raster1 = Raster('/path/to/raster1') raster2 = Raster('/path/to/raster2') out_final = (Abs(raster2) > 0.1) * raster1 out_final.save('/path/to/raster3') I'm not sure why you're getting the ...


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One way is to convert the creek distances to integer format if they are not already integers. For more precision you can multiply them by some larger value (a "scale factor") and round; later you can divide by that same value. Because the creek distances are integers, you can perform a Euclidean allocation (usually at the same time you compute the ...



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