Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Use GDAL/OGR to execute SQL on either the shapefile, or the ESRI Personal GeoDatabase (PGeo). from osgeo import ogr ogr.UseExceptions() ds = ogr.Open(path_to_data_source) lyr = ds.ExecuteSQL('SELECT ID, Notes FROM site_locations') for idx in range(lyr.GetFeatureCount()): feat = lyr.GetFeature(idx) geom = feat.GetGeometryRef() wkb = ...


2

Step 1: get the coordinates in the csv to points. You'll first need to determine, if possible, the coordinate system used. You say lat/lon, so right away it should be a Geographic Coordinate System. Frequently it will be GCS WGS84, but there are other datums out there and it's best to be sure. Once you have that info you can use Add Delimited Text Layer and ...


0

This operation is called a "Spatial Join". You can use the "Join Attributes by Location" tool in QGIS.


1

I would use the 'Point sampling tool' plugin in QGIS. Check the bottom of How do I use the field-calculator in QGIS to return the name of a country from a different shapefile?


0

You can easily load Shapefiles into dashDB using the user interface. Instructions here: https://www-01.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/SS6NHC/com.ibm.swg.im.dashdb.doc/learn_how/loaddata_gsdata.html


1

Directly loading KML data is not yet possible with dashDB. But you can load GML. See e.g. https://www-01.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/#!/SS6NHC/com.ibm.db2.luw.spatial.topics.doc/doc/db2sb169.html%23db2sb-gen168__fun-constr-geom If you have Esri ArcGIS tooling you can load KML data and store it into dashDB geometry columns.


3

It is just a synonym for the raster data you want to analyse. Unlike vector features, which are built from a geometry attribute (i.e. coordinates) and an attribute table, rasters are both geometry and attributes. A raster is a grid of cells (pixels), each containing a VALUE (hence 'raster value'). The value can stand for whatever attribute one wishes, yet ...


0

Here are a list of resources (by no means comprehensive) that may be useful to you: NASA's MODIS provides imagery to identify wildfires: https://earthdata.nasa.gov/data/near-real-time-data/data/hazards-and-disasters/fires This website provides weekly global snapshots of fires: http://lance-modis.eosdis.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/imagery/firemaps.cgi This website ...


1

@mr.adam covers a lot. One more suggestion; while coordinate systems are no longer in folders, they don't need to be actual files now. See: Geographic coordinate systems Projected coordinate systems You can then create your spatial reference object as such: For NAD 83 UTM Zone 10: By name: SRbyName = arcpy.SpatialReference ("NAD 1983 UTM Zone 10N") ...


1

Well, your questions seem to mostly be about user input. I would recommend using a dropdown menu in the tool dialog with coded values, and then a dictionary in the script itself that links each coded value with the full text string that you need. For example, in your dropdown for "Convert to Coord System" list "NAD 1983" and "WGS 1984". Set this in the ...


2

Don't know what will happen, I've never used ArcSDE. But you can check the state of the Editor using IEditor.EditState property and use that to stop your addin launching what ever code it was going to do?


3

I'm going to make a few assumptions about your data: Your roads are in one polyline feature class Your roads are topologically correct (lines touch at intersections) If so, you can create a topology and add a rule for "dangles". This will analyse your data for roads that do not touch other roads (i.e. cul-de-sacs, etc). Here are some links on ...



Top 50 recent answers are included