Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I get the same nasty effect if I load the data with Add vector layer using the ogr driver: <provider encoding="System">ogr</provider> Alternatively (and the preferred way) I can load the data with Add spatialite layer. The encoding line changes to: <provider encoding="System">spatialite</provider> which is wrong ...


2

Ok, found at least one working solution. After finding that on Linux everything is fine suspected the default encoding in Windows. So I opened the QGIS project file (*.qgs) in PSPad and found this in layer description: <provider encoding="System">ogr</provider> So probably QGIS uses CP1250 encoding as default in Windows while the database is ...


0

I think this is rather a packaging problem. The package you mention is from the official python sources. For Windows builds with OSGEO4W, the version number is 3.0.1-1, and it is installed by default. According to this ticket for Ubuntu: https://hub.qgis.org/issues/10099, pyspatialite is now part of python-qgis, so no need to install it separately. Maybe ...


3

Yes. It does as it appears from looking at the source code for the Spatialite Data Provider. The QgsSpatiaLiteFeatureIterator class is the one that supplies the features to the map upon sending a rectangle extent. You can just search for 'spatialIndex' in that class to see they actually use the index if available.


1

Add first a geometry column into your table with SQL SELECT AddGeometryColumn('your_table','geometry',4326,'POINT',2); Then populate the new geometry column by constructing point geometries from your Latitude and Longitude fields with SQL UPDATE your_table SET geometry = GeomFromText('POINT('||"Longitude"||' '||"Latitude"||')',4326);



Top 50 recent answers are included