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26

I played with this topic a lot some time ago. You can find some examples here: Dobrou extensions plugin examples Dobrou extensions plugin homepage Using Sporttracks and this plugin, gps tracks can be converted to KML and displayed in Google Earth. It supports some ideas mentioned here - track coloring based on color gradient, direction arrows and much more. ...


22

I've always done it as width. For example you create a buffer around each point that represents speed and then dissolve the buffers into one. Narrow areas indicate bottlenecks. For an example see: http://www.fmepedia.com/index.php/Bufferer Of course, you can even color code the buffers before merging them. For an example see: ...


21

Good question. Geography, and later GISc have been struggling to incorporate 4th dimension since Torsten H├Ągerstrand brought time into geographic research. Couple of things from the top of my head: One of the solutions is to use 'space time aquarium' where in 3D space you can use X and Y to represent location in space and Y to represent time. Two names ...


19

A simple and efficient way is to color the segments depending on their speed. For example, "fast" segments can be displayed in green and "slow" segments in red (other colors can be chosen of course). Example on an orienteering-running GPS trace using the software Chmuk: Another example with the software quickroute: The parts of the route where the ...


12

As always, it depends ... :-) I see at least 3 different scenarios when time is involved. 1) The time part is different inside a geometry. A track log from a GPS for instance, if you make a linestring from that. Then you will have different timestamps for each vertex inside the linestring, and you can interpolate a calculated time at any place on the ...


12

I think you may be interested in work described as time geography, and you may want to use search terms such as space-time-path or space-time-cube. In the space-time-cube technique I would imagine you could still use color to represent velocity of the movements, although it is inherently represented in the space/time distance between nodes on your path. ...


10

Since you have multiple objects being tracked I would go with using color to differentiate objects and instead of colour to show speed, I'd use thin lines perpendicular to the direction of movement illustrating 10 second intervals (say). Closer lines = slower. Not the best sketch below, but you get the idea:


10

You can record the position of the vehicle with a regular time interval and gradually fade out old time points. Adding a line at each point whose length is representative of the speed can help too. Below is an example from Microsoft Research. It's quite easy to see the relative speed of different countries in this graph. ...


8

I think I would go for something in the direction of Trevesys suggestion but only with dots instead. Longer between the dots means faster and closer between them means slower. It is easy to think of the speed like, high speed should get a more powerful visualization, but I am tempted to think the reverse because the symbol is bounded to a special place on ...


8

How about arrow symbols? Length of arrow = speed of the object at that location. You also get direction for free. And the whole thing is very intuitive -- no need to glance over at the legend to remind yourself of the interpretation. It's used all the time for wind-speed maps, but there's nothing saying you can't symbolize objects this way too: ...


8

You might be interested in my slides from a SXSW panel on geotemporal visualization. While they don't cover every single approach, they do a pretty good job of offering examples for the most common approaches (note that many of these examples require a browser with SVG or Canvas support, so not IE<9): Showing time as a line on a map Showing time as map ...


7

If you're looking for a video output, commercial tools like EONfusion can make nice 3D environments with temporal information. Similarly, I agree Google Earth (and its plugin) are a simple tool for visualizing interactive temporal data. Visual Complexity keeps a database of network visualizations, many of these are spatio-temporal visualizations, such as the ...


7

ArcGIS 10 Animation http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#/What_is_an_animation/000900000001000000/ ArcGIS 10 Temporal Data http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#/A_quick_tour_of_temporal_data_management_and_visualization/005z00000021000000/ You can record either and export to either image (animated gifs) or ...


7

I've been doing my own research on temporal databases this week. I found this answer on StackOverflow very helpful. For a fundamental understanding of the principles, it's worthwhile to read the introductory chapters of Developing Time-Oriented Database Applications in SQL by Snodgrass. I'm finding that true temporal databases are rather complex, but a ...


7

The simplest approach seems to be three tables: station (id, name, position, ...) parameter (id, name, unit, ...) reading (station_id, parameter_id, timestamp, value, ...) There are currently 40 recording stations, but that might change You can add any number of stations. It might be interesting to add information about operating time of a ...


7

You might want to have a look at some of Gennady & Natalia Andrienko's papers. They have published extensively on the issue of geovisualization of movement data and some of their output might be helpful here. Cooper Smith has also done some interesting work using processing.


7

CartoDB can definitely handle a dataset that large, including filtering, infowindows, and multiple different versions of the map (i.e. styles and selected filters) using the same dataset. This, for example, is around 100mb of polygon data being styled on the fly with each click of the little menu, http://bl.ocks.org/andrewxhill/raw/8324313/ You can ...


6

In the case of changing political and other administrative boundaries I think the Great Britain Historical GIS had a good way of handling the problem, the structure of the data base is described at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9780470987643.ch13/pdf and a large number of related papers can be seen at ...


5

ArcGIS 10 has it covered well http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#/Supported_field_formats/005z00000006000000/ and best practices http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#/Best_practices_for_storing_temporal_data/005z00000005000000/


5

QGIS can handle spatio-temporal data with Time Manager plugin. Features can have either one timestamp or two specifying start and end time.


5

Maybe Multitemporal Multivariate data visualization plugin for QGIS is closer to what you're looking for. Screenshot: http://www.bernawebdesign.ch/byteblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/multiview.png


5

The Weather Underground does this - Road Trip Planner (with Weather) http://www.wunderground.com/roadtrip/ Example Route above: ...


5

See here how to easily make movies with raster data: http://grass.osgeo.org/wiki/Movies


5

Check i2maps framework. There are two examples using animated data that might be of some help: Agent-based simulation: A micro-simulation of pedestrian flows on the campus. In this example we do not use a server-side simulation engine but test browser's performance to process and visualize dynamic OpenLayers objects. Public transportation: A ...


5

I guess you are missing time format. If you are using DateTime Field for "Start Time Field" and "End Time Field", you don't need to take care about "Time Value Format". But if you are using Text Field, then the time string must be same as "Time Value Format". Please check [Mosaic Dataset Properties]Dialog > [Default]Tab. In this case, "TIME" is Text type ...


4

I really like using Google Earth for temporal data. Really nice platform for communicating, very smooth animation and relatively easy to 'program' Google Earth & Time Should be a list of animated chloropleths and volumetric there... have fun!


4

Here are two options: QGIS Time Manager ArcGIS Time Slider


4

GeoNode is a platform combining different open source projects (Django, GeoExt, OpenLayers, GeoWebCache, GeoServer, GeoNetwork) for the management and publication of geospatial data. E.g. used by Mapstory which offers infrastructure for animated maps with a historic perspective:


4

About different geometry types: From your description it looks like you should absolutely store your trajectories as linestrings. If you store them as points or multipoints you will have to build linestrings in runtime if you don't only want to do the calculations on the points defining the trajectories but also what is between the points. an Example (in ...


3

If you want to use ENVI, it's straightforward. You can find out how to do it here Given that your datasets are univariate (NDVI, temperature, pecipitation), you may want to encode them into an RGB composite dataset and plot a single "map" for each timestep.



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