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It works in two steps: gdalwarp -te -180 -16 -179 -15 s16W180.hgt test.tif gdalwarp -t_srs "epsg:3857" test.tif out.tif The first command kicks off the extra half pixel on the wrong side of the 180° meridian. You get an output file that is 1178P x 1222L. Alternatively, with gdal_translate: gdal_translate -a_ullr -180 -15 -179 -16 S16W180.hgt test2.tif ...


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Slope is rise / run. Compute rise and compute run and you have your answer. It is simple to compute the distance between geographic coordinates. This will introduce less resampling error as compared to conversion to UTM, etc.


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GDAL can read/write these raster formats with the SRTMHGT driver. This means you can view the raster with QGIS, ArcGIS, or use GDAL utilities like gdallocationinfo to get values from a point, e.g.: Convert DMS to DD: Lat: 50°24'58.888"N = 50 + (24 / 60) + (58.888 / 3600) = 50.4163577778 Long: 14°55'11.377"E = 14 + (55 / 60) + (11.377 / 3600) = ...



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