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0

See here, at the developer's blog: http://blog.kartena.se/tag/proj4leaflet/


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You should be able to set your default rendering options from ArcMap so that any images you load will be rendered in a specified way. To do this, go to "Customize", select "ArcMap Options", select the "Raster" tab, and then the "Raster Layer" secondary tab. In this menu you will find many options for rendering any newly loaded rasters. The section ...


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You can do that in the Python Console of QGIS with this code: from qgis.gui import QgsMapCanvas nc = iface.mapCanvas() layers = [] renderers=[] n = nc.layerCount() for i in range(n): layers.append(nc.layer(i)) for layer in layers: renderers.append(layer.renderer()) for renderer in renderers: renderer.setOpacity(0.1) #I used a too low value ...


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I think I'd probably look to download the data into Postgres using ogr2ogr then look at TileStashe for serving the vector tiles. Docs for ogr2ogr WFS driver: http://www.gdal.org/drv_wfs.html @underdark wrote about using ogr2ogr: http://anitagraser.com/2012/09/26/wfs-to-postgis-in-3-steps/ There are some pointers for configuring TileStashe here: ...


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Do you need something like Raster-Extraction-Clipper plugin?? you can give the polygon file as mask layer or you can "play" with the extent (for the parts you want to cut).


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From what you've described, a simple option would be to use Tilestache. It supports mbtiles natively, so you don't need to unpack them. That is good for maintenance purposes, and can save space because of the view idea I described in a comment on another of your questions. There are at least three ways to serve tiles with Tilestache. I'd go with the first ...


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Based on available documentation, it sounds like you need to : Install a webserver on the Pi, like Apache Place the tiles (which you said you've already generated) into a known directory structure within your web server. Per the previously link: Change the OpenLayers instance to use your own tileserver instead of the main one The link in the 2nd point ...


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Maybe you could rely on osm2x3d project. Demo here: http://web.osm2x3d.net The main feature is to convert osm xml data to x3d format (3D scene graph). Also using x3dom js library, it allows to render the result natively in a web browser.


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According to the article Rendering in the OSM wiki, there is at least the program Maperitive which can load raw OSM data for areas of a specific size, and the you can produce tiles by pre-defined or self-created map styles for zoom-level z... to z... After processing you have a bunch of pre-rendered tiles for offline use in a directory structure like used ...


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You question is vague and there is a high probability that private companies will never publicly state anything about their investments in their core software stack. That said, for opensource software, you can use OpenHub to get a rough estimate of the software value thanks to the COCOMO method. Note that OpenStreetMap uses (among other tools) Mapnik for ...



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