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-1

Take a look at tilebelt https://github.com/mapbox/tilebelt : quadkeyToTile(quadkey)


0

Geoserver has a nice gui and does a good job. If you wanted to persist with dynamic tiles from tilemill you could have combined that with mapproxy.


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I had exact same need and ended up building two tools: tilestrata – Pluggable tile server written in Node.js. There's a mapnik plugin and disk cache. tilemantle – A command-line tool for warming the tile cache. It works by sending HEAD requests to the tileserver. Via a special header it can tell tilestrata to skip the cache and render a new tile. You can ...


2

No, you don't need separate vector files for each zoom level. Of course they could speed things a little bit up but will also require much more storage space than using a single database for a specific area. However do note that PBF files are not suited for on-demand rendering. They are designed for efficiently storing OSM data, not for running queries on ...


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Unfortunantly a map made in Adobe Illustrator is not really a map that can be used in a proper web mapping application. It does not contain any coordinates that would help to locate things on a globe. Regards, Rowan


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For the moment CartoDB editor does not support to add third party tiled layers on top of CartoDB layers. In case we'd add support we would publish in our blog http://blog.cartodb.com/


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Please read the simple and complete tilelayer plugin howto docs: https://github.com/minorua/TileLayerPlugin


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As a work-around, you can use the Split Raster (Data Management) tool to do this. Here is a basic example, although you can adjust the parameters to include overlapping tiles, etc. import arcpy, os outws = r'C:\temp\split_raster' raster = r'C:\temp\split_raster\yourRaster.tif' fishnet = r'C:\temp\split_raster\fishnet.shp' arcpy.SplitRaster_management ...


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Ok, just a shot in the dark, but instead of for feat in fishnet: #etc try looping with this: cnt = int(arcpy.GetCount_management("fishnetlayer").getOutput(0)) for i in range(cnt): arcpy.SelectLayerByAttribute_management("fishnetlayer", "NEW_SELECTION", '"FID" = ' + str(i)) #etc That should work because I believe that shapefiles always have ...


2

If you are in doubt, apply a zoom level option of --zoom 8-12 and check all resulting output folders. It always worked for me with this option.


2

You can have a look at the OSM wiki about Slippy_map_tilenames ... There are some URL definitions for different OSM based tile services. Thus you can see the meaning of x y z values. Also there are some mathematical formulas how to calculate tile numbers from lat/lon I think.



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