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5

I am not sure if I completely understand what your application is doing. Are you sending a query to postGIS every time the bbox changes and then render the response as a vector layer? If that's the case, in my experience, there are no obvious solutions to the problem. No magic bullets yet, but still solutions can be found, here some ideas: Maybe not what ...


4

A. I don't think tilestache will have problem with serving 200 users (assuming that they're really just human users, not some bot scraping the server) from MBTiles. B. Client side caching isn't really determined by the server architecture. So it is possible to use MBTiles (or another caching solution) on the client side, if you want to. See MapBox IOS ...


4

The default OSM preview page's URL is ip_address:port_number/osm/preview.html#10/37.8000/-122.2600 which indicate the zoom level is 10, so I guess you did not export mbtiles file up to that zoom level that's why TileStache generates empty page then you could manually change the zoom level and lat/lon value to force TileStache to work out preview page. I ...


4

So I am able to get all the layers in a single layer, a "composite" by using the MultiProvider provider in the class and just passing it the layers I want in the composite as the arguments. It results in a single JSON file that contains all of my layers. This is the layer I added in the cfg "composite": { "allowed origin":"*", ...


3

This might be helpful for your problem as it was really helpful for me once when I was doing JSON encryption.


3

I've written my own geojson map tiler driver in ruby. it's a quick and dirty ruby script to create geojson tiles from a postgis database using gdal/ogr. I could not find out how to cut the geojson directly, so I imported the json into a postgis database and exported them using ogr. ogr is supposed to read geojson but I could not get the driver to work ...


3

I got the tiles to overlay correctly. The problem was in the re-projection done by both ArcMap and QGIS. When I was checking the reprojected shapefiles in ArcMap and QGIS, they were overlaying correctly and had the correct SRIDs. So I imported the shapefiles in WGS84 in PostgreSQL using the SRID4326 with shp2pgsql then used ST_Transfrom to reproject the ...


3

I would try to use the tilestache-seed.py script: https://github.com/TileStache/TileStache/blob/master/scripts/tilestache-seed.py You can get the bounds of your parcel (which units depend on the units of your data) and pass it into the script. use the '-x', '--ignore-cached' options to force the tiles to be regenerated. Since your data is coming from ...


3

Geoserver is an OGC compliant Web server which can serve out data in OGC's web services, namely WMS, WFS & WCS. You want to get GeoJSON Tiles, and use it in your Leaflet Map. GeoJSON tiles are not a OGC standard, and GeoServer can not serve out GeoJSON Tiles. TileStache on the other hand, can serve out GeoJSON Tiles from ESRI Shapefile, PostgreSQL, ...


3

You will need a Linux machine to deploy what you have been working on. I would use nginx as webserver/reverse proxy (because it serves static tiles very fast), the rest (tilestache,django) are very familiar on Linux distro (Ubuntu particularly), you can find many tutorials about deployment of Django + nginx on Google.


3

Does anyone know how i can display the UTF Character overlays by themselves? Something like this is done by glower - it'd be possible to just display all grids all the time. i want to understand more about how this technology works. I assume the utfgrid overlays are drawing as vector tiles beneath the image tiles but firebug isn't showing me much. No,...


2

I had the same problem. Almost drove me crazy - documentation is a bit scarce and I started to look in the sources. Turned out to be a bug in the mapnik library (installed from some Ubuntu PPA). After cloning the git repository and building everything from source, it is working fine now. Note that the UTFGrid spec has provisions to avoid the character "\...


2

Use OpenLayers.Layer.XYZ instead. TMS is just XYZ with the Y flipped for historical non-reasons.


2

Probably you are looking for this page: This page lists implementations of software that work with vector tiles using the Mapbox protobuf format.


2

By default shp2pgsql does NOT create indexes. You need to pass -I to make it generate a spatial index. http://postgis.net/docs/manual-1.3/ch04.html#id435762 Check if your table has an index by running \d tablename in psql. In the list of indexes should be a line with "gist" (unless you picked a different index) and your geometry column name. You can add ...


2

I asked a similar question and I am not aware of any tile server to support a time dimension. The best solution I came up with, was to have different layers with the time dimension, see our demo version. Weather.com seems to have a similar approach as you can see in their tile ulrs (with a timestamp in the folder/layer structure): http://tiles.weather....


2

To use different queries for different zoom levels you will have to provide queries for each zoom level that you want to use, I think it should be able to query from a different table as well, since we are only defining the database in the kwargs. I have it working using this layer in the cfg "roads": { "allowed origin":"*", "...


2

I would say that for zoom greater than 15, if you split your area of interest into smaller areas(Bounding box), you will be able to cache them in much less time by running multiple processes on a single machine. For example, you are running zoom 16 (having 50,000,00 tiles) on a machine and according to your average tile-caching speed, this process will ...


2

Column and row along with the zoom level are needed to identify a specific tile. This section in the osm wiki shows how they are calculated.


1

Another thing to try if you're using a standard query is creating a materialized view from the query, and building your tiles from that: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.3/static/sql-creatematerializedview.html What this will do is make you a table that stores the query (so you could potentially update it in the future). Make sure you have spatial indices ...


1

Tx for the feedback, this is important for others who find this question in the future. Are you using WGS84 in your tilestache configuration? There is also a 'projected' attribute you might have to set. You are using VecTile class, I haven't played with that one yet, but you might be able to get it work (or atleast it will give you some clue/ideas to ...


1

The answer is indeed located inside tilestache-seed.py. Since I need to trigger the cache invalidation whenever a feature is updated, I needed to extract the juicy bits. So now on post-save I pass the features to this method: def invalidate_feature_cache(layer, features): """ invaldiates the cached tiles that contain the features @:param ...


1

Make sure your geometry columns contain the correct SRID. Run: psql osmgis -c 'select * from geometry_columns;' If your layer a) is not there, or b) has a SRID of 0, you'll need to look up how to remedy that so that the layer is there with the correct SRID. The right way to do that depends on your version of PostGIS.


1

Not a lot of documentation about that parameter, but I was able to get my configuration working by specifying "png options": {"palette256": True} in my layer configuration.


1

You can use tilestache to output to a mbtiles, it is documented here Documentation Looking at this you change the configuration file to have "provider": { "name": "mbtiles", "tileset": "collection.mbtiles" }


1

In Tilestache you specify the following array of resolution in the projection object: [5545984, 2772992, 1386496, 693248, 346624, 173312, 86656, 43328, 21664, 10832, 5416, 2708, 1354, 677, 338.5, 169.25, 84.625, 42.3125, 21.15625, 10.578125, 5.2890625, 1] You told us that you are using the same resolutions as link #2 which are: [234.375, 117.1875, 58....


1

How about GeoServer? Geoserver's development is guided by the OGC and it is the reference implementation for many geospatial web standards. It was the latter fact that 'sold' it to me when I was looking for something similar to you. Geoserver provides you with a single and very accessible UI rater than the rather bitty feel of other web-mapping stacks. ...


1

It's an old question, but there are some new answers now. WhirlyGlobe-Maply can now do vector map display on iOS. http://mousebirdconsulting.blogspot.com/2014/03/vector-maps-introduction.html


1

There's an existing MapBox iOS SDK that pulls raster tiles rather than vector tiles, but is native. It can bring in other vector sources for overlays, like GeoJSON and KML, if necessary. TileStache is a Python map server, not a Obj-C map client.


1

Srisa, I know it's been many months since you asked this question, but I've just had to grapple with the same issue. Turns out that the zoom limit of 18 is in modestmaps.js, not TileStache, and you can get around it by adding a call to .setZoomRange() in TileStache/Core.py. Here are lines 729-746: <body> <div id="map"></div> <...



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