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You can use a little bit of python to do this but you need first to generate a dictionary or table, from your observers position, of the angle to the real world horizon seems to be at. This would need to be at say 1 degree intervals with 0 = true north and for each degree giving the angle of the horizon. This can come from your r.horizon. You could then, ...


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I installed the ephem python package in my GNU/Debian Linux System and, I could use it at the Python Console of QGIS. I created an observer for a point near of Utah Lake (USA) and it was calculated the raising and setting sun for '2010/6/21' day. The script was: import ephem #defining an observer obs = ephem.Observer() #defining position long = ...


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You could use a library like PyEphem to find, for a given location, elevation, day, time(s) (and planet ;) the azimut and altitude angles of the sun.


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What recourse do I have in this situation? Acquire/integrate data with finer resolution. Can the 10m DEM be re-sampled perhaps to more accurately reflect the actual landscape? No, it can't. At least without inputting additional data. Should field surveys be employed in addition to re-sampling? It is an alternative. Alternatively, are you ...


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I think the problem is related to how you change the projection of your data. If the DEM data was originally in geographic projection (WGS84), and not projected to UTM zone 10S, then you need to reproject the original DEM image (the WGS84) again in a proper way. When you reproject (Warp) the DEM from geographic to UTM projection, it is better that you choose ...


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This strongly depends of the data structures you have. I think some voxel reperesentation is required for the kind of diagrams you mention. Perhaps GRASS GIS is a worth a consideration: https://grass.osgeo.org/screenshots/3D/



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