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8

You can put the WKT text into a text file, and run gdalsrsinfo on it: gdalsrsinfo test.txt >out.txt PROJ.4 : '+proj=lcc +lat_1=26.666667 +lat_2=29.333333 +lat_0=28.002808 +lon_0=84 +x_0=500000 +y_0=500000 +a=6377301.243 +b=6356100.230165384 +units=m +no_defs ' The ellipsoid parameters look very much like Kalianpur 1962, EPSG 4145: +proj=longlat ...


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Vincenty's formula (ellipsoid based) is more accurate than haversine (sphere based). Also, lat and long are usually expressed in degree, but your coordinates are not in 0-180, therefore you could be in another system than expected.


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Using gdal. Have a look at gdal_translate to convert to from tif to another format (although the tif is likely the best option). Then use gdalwarp to reproject to mercator. Gdal is written in python so you should be able to incorporate it straight into your workflow.


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Is this data sourced from India or Nepal? The EPSG Geodetic Parameter Dataset lists two transformations that apply to Nepal. It's difficult to recommend something in particular because the geographic coordinate reference system (datum) that you have just lists the ellipsoid information. tfm 6208 is actually for Nepal 1981 to WGS 1984. The ellipsoid is a ...


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While shapely doesn't natively understand coordinate systems, shapely.ops.transform() can do that along with pyproj. If pyproj.Proj can understand your both of your coordinate systems, then it can be made into a function that shapely can transform with. From the shapely docs: from functools import partial import pyproj from shapely.ops import transform ...


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Redefining the original file as WGS84 does the trick at least for accuracy for any practical purpose. The following was sent by a customer care rep at ESRI... 1] ITRF 2008 is a datum definition that takes continental drift into consideration. 2] The WGS 1984 definition used in ArcGIS Desktop is the original definition, and has not been updated to take ...


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Finding the center is not as simple as you think. take an example square in EPSG:4326: Transform it into World Mercator, and the center is somewhere else: In Lambert conformal conical, it is not yet a rectangle: And same for azimutal equidistant: So be careful if you think of a "simple" rectangle and its center point. The world is not a plane! My ...



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