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The CTS wiki https://github.com/orbisgis/cts/wiki/Create-a-new-CoordinateReferenceSystem-from-a-reference-code has been updated to include a full example now. The adding of the appropriate registry was missing from it previously. After creating the CRSFactory instance, the appropriate registry has to be added to its registry manager. In this case I wanted ...


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use Heg tools. You can save to tif and reproject to geographic coordinates. Also you can use batch.


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There is a MODIS Reprojection Tool available from the USGS here: https://lpdaac.usgs.gov/tools/modis_reprojection_tool You'll need to create an account to download it, but the registration seems painless.


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From the GeoTools Referencing FAQ - Can I just use Referencing without the rest of GeoTools? Yes, you will need to use the metadata module, and one of the epsg modules. Along with their dependencies such as units. Then all you need to do is: CoordinateReferenceSystem sourceCRS = CRS.decode("EPSG:4326"); MathTransform transform = ...


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Currently, this functionality is not supported in ArcGIS for Desktop (including the upcoming 10.4). A map (mxd) has a list of active geographic/datum transformations that are listed per pair of geographic coordinate reference systems (CRS). It's called, and you can access it in ArcObjects as the GeoTransformationOperationSet. When you select transformation ...


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The EPSG Geodetic Parameter Registry reports the area of use (which is smaller than what the map projection algorithm usually supports) as: minimum latitude = +45 degrees maximum latitude = +90 degrees minimum longitude = -180 degrees maximum longitude = +180 degrees The longitude of natural origin (aka central meridian) is +10 degrees longitude. To ...


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EPSG:3575 is a Lambert Equal-Area Azimuthal projection centered at the North Pole. Although it uses the WGS84 datum, the underlying calculations for this ellipsoid are performed by making a (small) equal-area deformation of the ellipsoid to a sphere (using authalic latitudes) and then applying the spherical projection formulae. Thus, it suffices to ...



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