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7

No API, but you can find references to individual transit agencies that have their data public: GTFS Data. You could write a script to download/combine data from the references.


4

Some cities have open data agreements, like Toronto (www.toronto.ca/open), and you could obtain transit data from these for the cities you require and aggregate them (if you wanted one network of all transit) or use them in your analyses as you see fit. I'm reasonably certain that the Toronto dataset contains all of your parameters.


4

In last year's Google Summer of Code program a student implemented a pgRouting function for multi-modal routing. It didn't make it into the new 2.0 release, so it probably doesn't work right now, but you may want to take a look at the available resources to see if it's helpful or not: Wiki Page: ...


3

You will not be able to find a one-stop-shop for transit data, as some agencies view there data/information as copyrighted and proprietary (see New York) and not for outside or unapproved use. Some agencies openly share and embrace third party users to expand and extend to support the public (Portland is one, Denver another) but you will see a mixed bag.Good ...


3

Transit routes. A route is a group of trips that are displayed to riders as a single service. (The entire route) GTFS Routes are equivalent to "Lines" in public transportation systems. Routes are defined in the file routes.txt, and are made up of one or more Trips - remember that a Trip occurs at a specific time and so a Route is time ...


3

Now, if the expected bus position (the planned bus route if you will) is created by using basic city GIS data (i.e. the planned bus route follows the centerlines of streets/boulevards/avenues/etc) then the delta with the actual bus location can be quite large, which would, I expect, create accuracy issues with the information the management system ...


3

Open Trip Planner (Developer Section) OTP Deployer — The easiest way to get started with OTP is by using OTP Deployer, an web-based utility provided by OpenPlans Transportation. Deployer allows users to simply provide their transit data in the standard GTFS formay, and the rest of the process — from gathering street network data to building the ...


2

Don't know if this helps you, because I think UTDF is not very "europe related". What I know, there are a lot of different combinations of spatial database model <-> Exchange Format <-> Traffic analysis software. It depends mostly on the exchange format which is supported by your traffic analysis software, but its very hard to get out of the box ...


2

For the types of management issues you are talking about, extremly accurate information is likely not needed. Even if the GIS system was very detailed, there is no way transit companies can affort GPS that give position to the centimeter, let alone be able to account for all the other random traffic patterns that would make a bus arrival still variable. ...


2

Given a GPS coordinate from a specific bus, and the centerline route which that bus operates along, they can simply calculate the shortest distance between the actual coordinate and the official route and essentially "place" the bus exactly on the route at that closest point in order to report "where" it is. There's nothing that I can see to be gained from ...


2

I can think of two uses for gis data in transit management. 1. route pamphlet creation. 2. route mangement. you woud want either a very simplified or a schematic view of data for the big thick lines shown on the handouts (probably not even done with gis data). Out of scale, porportion, etc. For route management you want standardized network data that ...


2

In general, you can't get "all" data - OSM relies on volunteered data, and you can't reasonably know how complete it is. It is likely to be better (more complete, more up-to-date) in some areas than others. It still isn't easy to answer your question, because you're pointing to another site rather than telling us what you really need ("so why not just use ...


2

Here's the documentation from Google: https://developers.google.com/transit/gtfs/reference In this model, a "trip" occurs along a "route". I think the simplest difference can been seen in the fact that a "route" has no directionality, it's just a line along which a transit vehicle travels. So if you look only at the route, you don't know which direction ...


2

Actually creating the loop you want is really easy with SQL: SELECT DISTINCT ON (b1.line, b1.number) b1.line,b1.number,b2.waiting FROM busstops AS b1 LEFT JOIN busstops AS b2 ON b1.line = b2.line AND b1.number<=b2.number AND b2.waiting IS NOT NULL ORDER BY b1.line,b1.number,b2.number; Fiddle. It'd also be easy to, let's say, sum ...


2

You might want to look at OpenTripPlanner. There's an instance set up here that includes the MTA GTFS feeds. It was built with the transit index included, which can be queried via its API to find the nearest stops. The API can also be queried to plan trips. An example query, to find stops near a point: ...


1

You could try my routing script for QGIS Processing based on the core network analysis library. It expects a point layer and a network layer as input and returns a route between the points.:


1

ESRI have a new tool that allow to add GTFS to a Network Dataset, display GTFS Route Shapes, edit GTFS Stop Locations, calculates transit/walking service areas for a specific time of day and day of the week, and more effective gadegets. There is also a blog avout this tool with samples to each procedure a lot of more links


1

The general approach to such problems is to match the points to the street network, see Different approaches for map matching : links / ideas? route between consecutive points using route length and time difference between consecutive points, calculate the vehicle's average speed and assign it to the used street segments average the individual speed ...


1

google.maps.VehicleType object specification Possible values for vehicle types. These values are specifed as strings, i.e. 'BUS' or 'TRAIN'. BUS Bus. CABLE_CAR A vehicle that operates on a cable, usually on the ground. Aerial cable cars may be of the type GONDOLA_LIFT. COMMUTER_TRAIN Commuter rail. FERRY Ferry. ...


1

You have a few options available to you. As user20459 mentioned, you could perform a spatial join. This "joins attributes from one feature to another based on the spatial relationship. The target features and the joined attributes from the join features are written to the output feature class." Alternatively, you could look at some of the other Overlay ...


1

In addition to what @Kirk Kuykendall and @BradHards have said, consider trying the GTFS exchange site I know it's a google based information for their transit feeds; however, everything is well documented and you probably can reform the data to your needs. From their site: About GTFS Data Exchange This site is designed to help developers and ...


1

I figured it out. It was http proxy problem.


1

Try the source directly from the git repo here of opentripplanner. I think it's somewhere in this file where they setup the map. There you see: initialize : function(config) { otp.configure(this, config); this.map = otp.util.OpenLayersUtils.makeMap(this.mapDiv, this.options); if (this.baseLayer == null) { this.baseLayer = ...


1

To work with geocoder in OTP please refer to this post. here There are some slight improvements to the above post though( I have to spent hours to figure them out!), these are as follows For Google basemap In config.js just add these codes after the OSM declaration in baselayers: new OpenLayers.Layer.Google( "Google"), Add the Google Maps ...


1

The entry point for adding map layers is in the Controller. On line 56, the map controller is created: this.map = new otp.core.Map(this.config.map); Calling this.map.getMap(), will give you the OpenLayers.Map object. You're on your own from here, as we haven't really built api support for adding new layers to the map. This answer was ...


1

Sounds like a 'Level of Service' type analysis? The Transportation Research Board have published a 'Transit capacity and quality of service manual' - containing a section specifically on 'Quality of Service', and the analysis of the various measures of quality of service. http://www.trb.org/Main/Public/Blurbs/153590.aspx An example of how this has been ...



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