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This kind of calculation is often referred to as CoGo (for coordinate geometry). If you have several of them to do, and you don't wish to do any programming (or a lot of hand calculations) you can use Copan for Windows -- a free tool for CoGo and many other kinds of land survey calculations. You can enter known coordinates in one place and known bearings ...


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I suggest to use UTM zone 35. The points fall inside the Zambia borders: For UTM Zone 34 and 36, the points would be outside of the country, shifted horizonatlly into the next UTM zone. The "Grid" could be some local kilometer-wide grid for finding streets and places. It seems to be build from a Northing coordinate, "c" and an Easting coordinate in ...


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Zambia falls in the UTM zones 34 and 35 (quick check on Google Earth). The grid most probably refers to a grid of map sheets. Looking at the X in the coordinates, the points should fall within zone 34. The X in zone 35 does not go over ~684,000 (again, this is based on looking at GE). My answer is based on the information you provided and looking at GE. ...


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To get the coordinates of the points you can use these equations: Delta Y = Distance * Cos (Azimuth) Delta X = Distance * Sin (Azimuth) New Y = Y + Delta Y New X = X + Delta X First you'll have to get the coordinates of B using these equations then go from there to C.


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If you are planning to perform spatial analysis using your data, I suggest you to reproject all your data into one projection, either using ArcGIS or FME. Sometimes the reprojections does not work perfectly on the first try, you may need to try a couple times to get it right.



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