Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

The other answers cover the Spatial Analyst extension. Another option is the 3D Analyst extension. You can create a TIN from your contours, then convert the TIN to a raster, before calculating the slope.


5

You first need to make a raster DEM from your contours. That requires the Spatial Analyst extension, and uses the Topo to Raster tool (Spatial Analyst | Interpolation toolbox). That elevation raster can then be used as the input for the Slope tool. Note that since this is an interpolation process, it is estimating the elevation values between the contour ...


0

In order to make a slope map you need to work with raster data. You will need to make a raster tile (ie: DEM) from your contours. With the output raster you will then be able to make a slope map.


1

Since the 1.10 version of GDAL/OGR, you can now "georeference" vectors layers (Add ability to transform vectors based on GCPs in ogr2ogr) with translations, rotations and shearing ogr2ogr -gcp 5 -135 0 0 \ -gcp 283 -135 1000 0 \ -gcp 5 278 0 1000 \ -gcp 283 278 1000 1000 \ -f "ESRI shapefile" gcppolyg2.shp gcppolyg.shp This feature ...


1

How did you do the setting them all in CRS WGS84? Using Set CRS for Layerhas definitely corrupted your data. This changes the CRS, but does not reproject the coordinates to the new CRS. So delete those layers with 6digit coordinates, and add them again. Usually the CRS information is stored in the file, and should not be altered. As mkennedy noted, they can ...


0

if you are snapping the B towards the A, you could create 5 m buffers around each A's, then you use snap with a tolerance of 60 meters.


4

I've figured out an algorithm for the grid approach using several Python tools. Rasterising and polygonising is done with rasterio, which is based on GDAL/OGR. Here are most of the imports: import rasterio import numpy as np from rasterio import features from shapely.geometry import mapping, shape from shapely.ops import cascaded_union from math import ...


3

For the Points that fall within the 65 meter radius, can't you just subtract 5 meters from A's Y coordinate and use A's X coordinate to find a Point at the 5 meter position? You can use the DA cursor to update these Point's Geometry to the 5m position.


0

If you're not limiting yourself to an arcpy solution, what you're describing sounds like fairly common practice with ArcObjects - there is a 'Buffer Snap Agent' sample here: Buffer snap agent http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/arcobjects-net/conceptualhelp/index.html#/d/000100000334000000.htm I haven't tested it but was interested in the VB.NET logic - ...


1

How about this for an idea. If B is within the specified distance of A then create a polyline between A and B. You can then create a point any distance along that polyline. Polyline object has a method positionalongline.


0

I've put a lot of time into trying to get route-me to render vectors. In my opinion using the built in vector rendering, RMPath and markers does not scale to the amount of data needed to render a map. That doesn't mean that route-me isnt an isn't an option, you could use mapnik to do the rendering, then pass the data to route-me to render. As of now there ...


2

Do the following: add field "OldArea" to the parcels and populate with area values (Field right click - Calcualte Geometry) Perform Intersect with the Zones dataset add another field ("NewArea") and populate with areas after intersection (same way than #1) calculate the percentage = (NewArea/OldArea) * 100 in the new field


3

Version 5 of the Mapbox Streets vector tiles includes the house number in a new layer. I used the following to add them to the starting style: #housenum_label { text-name: '[house_num]'; text-face-name: @sans; text-fill: darken(#cde, 20%); text-size: 9; }


2

KML lacks support for projections. All data must be in lat/long using the WGS 84 datum. That can make it a pain to use as a data transfer format. It's worth taking a look at GeoPackage. It's a relatively new spec, but there are already a number of implementations out there. It's a single file (SQLite DB, supports all sorts of projections, and doesn't have ...


2

If the data is georeferenced, you do not need to rescale anything. However, you should be aware that your data sources have different spatial resolution and use a tolerance (20-50 m) to avoid sliver polygons due to this difference.


0

If all you want is a picture of the data then you can simply create an image and pass it's graphic object to the renderer in the same way as you would draw to the screen. However if you want a raster representation of the vector map then you should look at the VectorToRaster process.


2

From what you are explaining the Euclidean Distance would be (a) The buffers would be (b) So the differences would be in the corners (c)



Top 50 recent answers are included