New answers tagged

-1

Check out LIDAR Widgets at http://lidarwidgets.com There are native OS X apps available there for creating and viewing 3D terrain models from LAS/LAZ files. The apps are for OS X version 10.10 or higher.


2

The L.geoJson() constructor is actually just a convenient tool to convert GeoJSON data into Leaflet vector / path object(s) (like L.polyline, L.polygon, etc.). It also attaches the extra information that may be contained in the GeoJSON data into the created Leaflet objects (in layer.feature.properties for example). Therefore, if the GPS track that you ...


0

This looks indeed like some sort of missing value (as suggested by @Spacedman). Anyway, as a straightforward alternative to subsetting your data (as suggested by @nebi), you could simply use the zcol argument inside spplot to display only a desired range of values. Here is a reproducible example. library(raster) rst <- raster(volcano) ## no 'zlim' ...


0

Spacedman ist probably right but you could subset your dataframe before plotting like: df <- df[df$Z < 300,] spplot(df, "Z")


0

May I add this website that ESRI has their Map Book Gallary. It has Online, Map Book archive ? Sometimes when I need something to look at, I usually go this site and to look at them. http://www.esri.com/mapmuseum There is another one not only for International but in United States as well.. http://icaci.org/


0

Maybe you can try to browse on FOSS4G conference pages. They usually have poster session, like this one FOSS4G Europe 2015.


2

What you have is a hillshade surface built from a LiDAR point cloud. According to ESRI: A hillshade is a grayscale 3D representation of the surface, with the sun's relative position taken into account for shading the image. So each pixel of your .tif raster has an hypothetical illumination value given a reference position of the sun. What you want is ...



Top 50 recent answers are included