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Leaflet is certainly a good option, out of the box leaflet does not support kml but if you add a plugin like omnivore you should be able to get things work reasonably simply. Perhaps have a shot and post your code to jsfiddle if you get stuck then someone can provide more assistance. Regards, Rowan


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Currently, I don't believe ArcGIS desktop or online has an input for HEX codes. However, you can always use websites like http://www.colorschemer.com/online.html to convert a HEX code you already know or a RGB combination you have on ArcGIS to find the HEX code.


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This map by mapbox does it the best way I've seen Bike Share Map. That tilts the whole map, though, and you might just want to render isometric tiles. I have no idea how they did it, I assume it's a combination of WebGl, magic and hard work. The Minecrafter plugin for a Minecraft server does isometric tiles, but it's just a normal Leaflet map with fancy ...


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If you look at what is coming back from the server, by looking at the Network tab of Developer Tools, eg, in Chrome or Firefox, CTRLSHIFTI, then choose Network Tab, you will see a URL such as the following, http://www.ma-investment.gov.bh/bps_ppd_en/ESRI.ArcGIS.ADF.Web.MimeImage.ashx?ImgID=39a0cec7-30f8-4291-8dce-1b2509b2fe62&CacheTime=1&kc=1 ...


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I use Bootstrap (and you can try the excellent BootLeaf template) to build a webpage with a nearly full-screen map. I've also used Bootstrap to build a single-page app with a smallish map. You can also use simply Leaflet, and set up some buttons about the place using the built in controls, or roll your own user interface. To answer your actual question, ...


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So you want to create a heavy and dated looking panel based map interface? /joking/ Personally I would use Leaflet and JQuery. Both are very lightweight but have a wide range of mature plugins that can deliver what you need in a lightweight and modular way. I don't think Bootstrap will be of much benefit. Map frames are pretty much responsive by default ...


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The OpenLayers demo requests a single tile so there's no tiling issues to work around. When individual tiles are requested, as in the case by Leaflet.js, GeoServer renders each tile individually without knowing about the other surrounding tiles. This is most often run into when labels show up for a large feature once in each tile, but your symptoms looks ...


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At the moment I still prefer OpenLayers2. You can find a nice tutorial here: http://www.gistutor.com/openlayers/22-advanced-openlayers-tutorials/47-openlayers-wfs-t-using-a-geoserver-hosted-postgis-layer.html or even have a look at the "official" openlayers-example: http://dev.openlayers.org/releases/OpenLayers-2.13/examples/wfs-protocol-transactions.html ...


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The following will open a new page when the drawn feature is clicked: map.on('draw:created', function (e) { var type = e.layerType, layer = e.layer; layer.on('click', function(){ window.open('http://www.example.com','_blank'); }); drawnItems.addLayer(layer); }); This will bind a popup with a url: ...


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If you are looking for GEBCO iso-bath contour lines, I've found the following tile server useful.There zoom level isn't very high, but it might work for you depending on your application. Here is the server I call in a Leafet.js map: http://maps.ngdc.noaa.gov/arcgis/rest/services/web_mercator/gebco08_contours/MapServer/tile/{z}/{y}/{x} Hope this helps! ...



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