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The coordinate system might be EPSG:2412 Beijing 1954 / 3-degree Gauss-Kruger zone 36 with the Proj.4 definition +proj=tmerc +lat_0=0 +lon_0=108 +k=1 +x_0=36500000 +y_0=0 +ellps=krass +towgs84=15.8,-154.4,-82.3,0,0,0,0 +units=m +no_defs You can use that in GDAL ogr2ogr or cs2cs, or within the QGIS GUI to display the data, and convert to any other CRS. ...


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WGS84 is a geographic coordinate system* (ie spherical or ellipsoidal), which doesn't work very well for displaying images. Because images/rasters are typically based on square pixels, and the 'length' of a degree of longitude is greater at the equator than at the poles, there is significant distortion introduced in an image in a geographic display - more so ...


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You can use the Proj4 converter: http://trac.osgeo.org/proj/ Yes, it is a converter but you can convert bulk coordinates. Create a simple text file (let's say sweref99.txt) with the coordinates, e.g. 606905.22 6970515.93 635765.54 7223101.41 In order to convert all coordinates from this file the command is like this: cs2cs +init=epsg:3006 +no_defs +to ...


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The first (WGS 1984 UTM 33 North) has map units of meters, while the second has decimal degrees. If you're talking about a two-dimensional display, the WGS 1984 (decimal degree) data is often displayed using a "pseudo-Plate Carrée" projection. That is, the decimal degrees are treated as if they're linear units and the features are just displayed. A standard ...



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