2,648 reputation
42141
bio website andrewpwheeler.wordpress.com
location Albany, NY
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Apr 10 at 13:27

Doctoral Student in Criminal Justice.


Apr
4
comment Why some lines do not have Junctions in Network Analyst?
IMO you shouldn't have made a new question, but expanded on the prior one. That at least gives a bit more context to this problem.
Feb
19
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How to avoid ESRI secure layer identity manager popup
Jan
26
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Unable to expand projected co-ordinate system folder in ArcMap 10.1
Jan
22
comment Simplifying adjacent polygons using QGIS “Simplify Geometries” tool
This looks to me like your omitting a few steps, although the workflow might work in the end. When you convert the polygons to lines you might need to associate the line with all adjacent polygons. Then after simplification you need to turn the lines back into multi-part polygons. If the original polygons are convex you may be able to match the original to the simplified using the centroid (e.g. if the centroid of the original is contained in the simplified poly it is a match). If they aren't convex though it will be much harder.
Jan
10
awarded  Announcer
Dec
31
comment Isolating a street segment and assigning it a code
Thats good then. You should be able to build the street intersections to match in the LION file based on the node IDs then. Use the STREET variable in the LION file for the MAINSTREET variable, and use the To and From node IDs to build the possible intersections.
Dec
31
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Is there a way to keep toll_booth nodes in osm2po's output?
Dec
31
answered Isolating a street segment and assigning it a code
Dec
6
answered Generate clusters of X points within N meters
Oct
23
answered Exploratory search for clusters in point data
Oct
18
comment Kernel Density output labeling
possible duplicate of Interpretation of ArcGIS Kernel Density legend parameters
Oct
17
answered Spatial Analysis - Identifying Regions with Common Boundaries
Sep
30
comment Maps with charts of representative symbols
@whuber - I've seen Dan Carr use the stick figures most often I believe, e.g. mason.gmu.edu/~dcarr/lib/v9n2.pdf and goo.gl/JoMwve. I think I remember seeing a similar example to what you describe in the Slocum textbook, the glyph field was so dense it created the impression of an actual surface. If I wanted to dig up more references I would go back to Slocum and How Maps Work - I hope this is a sufficient start for whomever though!
Sep
30
comment Maps with charts of representative symbols
@geothery did you read my answer - the terminology glyphs are specifically mentioned in Vasan et al. (2013); Wickham et al. (2012); Dorling (2012); Friendly (2007). When I say I doubt it is standardized terminology I am saying I doubt non-geographers would recognize the term. I stated in the second sentence of my answer Vasan et al. (2013) is a great review of different types of glyphs.
Sep
30
comment Maps with charts of representative symbols
I've seen that particular statistical graphic called a waffle chart - and the point is loosely based on the ISOTYPE like diagrams of counting objects. Such glyphs are not regular enough to likely have any type of standardized terminology I imagine though.
Sep
30
comment Maps with charts of representative symbols
@geotheory - you asked what the terminology would typically be described and I answered glyphs. I then gave a variety of different examples of glyphs, a bunch of citations and some general discussion of when they are most useful. What other information are you looking for exactly?
Sep
30
comment Maps with charts of representative symbols
Although that might just suggest for such diagrams to be successful they should be smoothed (and placed on a regular grid) to begin with. @geotheory I have no idea what use of charted symbols to represent unit quantities of phenomena means - is there some confusion with my answer or another question you have?
Sep
30
comment Maps with charts of representative symbols
@whuber vector flow maps are great examples. Dorling has another that is one of the nicest examples of social science data I have seen here (although IMO he could make the arrow heads smaller). The arrows point to changes in the ternary diagram of election results in Britain's three party system. Social science data are rarely so kind, and they are much more difficult to parse when the arrows aren't laid on on a regular grid and the surface isn't as smooth.
Sep
29
answered Maps with charts of representative symbols