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I have bearing of two points 115 33' 09" and distance between these two points is 1464.36m. Is it possible to get the unknown coordinates from this data?

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    If you have coordinates of one of the points - yes. Nov 14 '14 at 8:15
  • Its unfortunate that i don't have one of the points
    – Mann Sam
    Nov 14 '14 at 8:43
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    No, not without one of the points. Based on the length and bearing, we could probably identify a latitude, but the longitude could be anything.
    – mkennedy
    Nov 14 '14 at 11:30
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Yes you can. One could use the Great Circle method of calculating distances between two points on the Earth.

An example of such calculator is available here.

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  • Do i need one of the coordinates on this one??
    – Mann Sam
    Nov 14 '14 at 8:44
  • Of course you do. You ask "If I walk one kilometer to the north, where do I come?". It really depends on where you stand right now. However, if you also know how much 1464.36 meters is in degrees it may be solvable because the length of one degree varies according to where you are on the earth.
    – user30184
    Nov 14 '14 at 8:50
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    @AndreJ Let's wait till some geodesy folks join discussion. Because earth is not sphere but flattened I do not believe it is exactly so. But didn't you think in a wrong way about eastwards/northwards? Myself I tend to imagine that the slices of the earth orange get narrower near the poles in east-west direction.
    – user30184
    Nov 14 '14 at 9:04
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    You have the symmetry problem for either latitude or longitude. On an ellipsoid a degree of latitude has a different length depending on where it is, but that doesn't tell you what longitude you're at.
    – mkennedy
    Nov 14 '14 at 11:28
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    The link in your answer appears broken
    – PolyGeo
    May 23 '18 at 9:24

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