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Is there a difference between Raster/Terrain Anaylsis and the same features in Raster/Analysis/DEM (Terrain Analysis)? The two appear to do the same types of computations; are they the same or is there a difference and if so, what?

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    A DEM is a raster, in Esri a Terrain is a terrain resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.2/index.html#//…. Raster needs Spatial Analyst, Terrain needs 3D analyst. Is there a specific tool that you want to know the difference in? – Michael Stimson Feb 24 '15 at 2:55
  • Sorry, I am learning QGIS and noticed that there is a Raster/Terrain Analysis menu item and also a Raster/Analysis/DEM (Terrain Analysis) menu item. The question is directed at QGIS users. – Robotuner Feb 24 '15 at 3:23
  • Perhaps you should include a QGIS tag on your question. I'm not sure about those tools, I haven't had a chance to experiment with them yet. – Michael Stimson Feb 24 '15 at 3:49
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    When you have fewer words in the body than are in the title, it's time for a rewrite. – Martin F Feb 24 '15 at 4:03
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    The menu Raster/Analysis/DEM (Terrain Analysis) uses GDAL (per Help button) and seems to be a default option. The menu Raster/Terrain Analysis is likely an installed plug-in, and uses a different library. Check Plugins/Installed to verify. – dvdhns Feb 24 '15 at 5:48
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The Raster -> Terrain Analysis menu entry is from the core Raster Terrain Analysis plugin, which is installed by default. You can deactivate it in the plugin installer. It is described here:

http://docs.qgis.org/2.0/en/docs/user_manual/plugins/plugins_raster_terrain.html

and a short tutorial is here:

http://manual.linfiniti.com/en/qgis_plugins/plugin_examples.html#basic-fa-the-raster-terrain-analysis-plugin

The Raster -> Analysis menu entries are from gdal tools, and can be expanded by using the command line options that are available. See the GDAL manpages for details.

A tutorial can be found here:

http://manual.linfiniti.com/en/rasters/terrain_analysis.html

In addition, the processing toolbox offers the GDAL tools too, and GRASS and SAGA routines for slope and hillshading.

So plenty of possibilities to get the style you want.

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