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I have managed to import/convert a KML into ArcGIS 10.0 (ArcMap) using the built-in conversion tools and now have a series of layers. Next, I export these layers to a PostGIS database using the following command:

ogr2ogr -f "PostgreSQL" PG:'host=localhost port=12345 dbname=mydb user=removed password=removed' Roads.gdb -progress --config PG_USE_COPY YES

Note that when doing so, four separate layers are stored as a single layer in PostGIS - I'm unsure whether or not that is relevant. Anyhow, next, I use GeoServer with the PostGIS database as a store to serve the layer using WMS, and have a Leaflet client display the tiles overlaid on various other tiles.

Somewhere in this process all color attributes from the data are apparently removed (The data are a set of lines over roads, colored based upon speed limit - each color is a separate ArcGIS layer).

How can I preserve the attributes of my data? I have access to ArcGIS Desktop, PostGIS, OGR/GDAL, and GeoServer.

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    PostGIS is just a geo-spatial component of PostgreSQL database. Databases typically do not store layer styles. Styling is usually performed on the client side (e.g. ArcMap, QGIS, Leaflet, OpenLayers...etc), or styled via a GIS server (e.g. ArcGIS server or GeoServer) as a WMS. – artwork21 Apr 8 '15 at 1:50
  • I'm sorry, I must be tired as I left that out - I am using GeoServer's WMS service [original question heavily edited]. How might I convey the layer styles to GeoServer? – bfishman Apr 8 '15 at 2:44
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Unfortunately, I have not found a method for creating SLD files in ArcMap for GeoServer use. There are some alternative app. options:

  • Udig
  • QGIS
  • GeoExplorer
  • GeoServer admin SLD editor
  • Thanks. I'll post a new question regarding the best way to go from KML -> PostGIS / GeoServer while preserving styles. – bfishman Apr 8 '15 at 15:24
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The following program ArcMap2SLDConverter will generate an SLD file from an ArcGIS Map - but you must have ArcGIS installed and running to do so.

This SLD can then be uploaded to GeoServer, and used to style the corresponding layer.

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