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Firstly a bit of background:

I'm currently using fields of type double to hold the results of our chemical analysis. Different samples were analysed for different analytes and several values were reported below the limit of detection or not analysed. In an attempt to make this clear I have used a coded value domain to swap specific values to text as in the image below. I know this isn't strictly what the coded domain was intended for.

Mixed Coded Domain and Data Attribute Table Snapshot

The problem:

What I want to be able to do is change the attributes field display to a specific number of decimal places. i.e. I want the numbers in the TotalNitrogen column to display to 3 decimal places.

What I have tried so far:

I have used numeric option under the field properties to specify the number of decimal places but this doesn't appear to work.

Additional caveats:

As I do not know what the end user of the dataset is likely to need I don't want this precision change permanent. I'm not adverse to using a different solution than using a mixed coded domain environment to qualify results (i.e. specify value is Below Limit of Detection) if a solution exists.

I am using ArcGIS Basic Licence level version 10.2.2.3552 in a Windows 7 environment if that helps.

Additional information requested in comments.

@Dan Jurgella The image below is how the coded domain is set up. Details of Coded Domain

  • This is my personal opinion but I think you are digging your own grave here! Mixing numbers and text will make it very difficult for you to do even the simplest analysis. Even though the source is still a number you've indicated that end users will be trying to use this data, you can't assume they will have the same understanding of the dataset as you have. If it were me I would abandon your approach. I would have used numbers like -9999 to indicate not measured and document that in the metadata. – Hornbydd Apr 28 '15 at 11:25
  • @Hornbydd Here is a bit more information which I missed: The data is actually -1 which related to "Below Limit of Detection" and -5 which is "Not measured". The coded domain applied to field allows the data to appear as text but for analysis purposes still remains a number as the field is double. I have documented the exact coding used in the files metadata. I haven't had any problems running further analysis as the dataset still behaves as numbers despite appearances (i.e still can calc statistics and use in numeric equations/models). I may remove domain if no other options suggested. – MBT86 Apr 28 '15 at 12:18
  • How do you have your domain set up? I assume you have two options: -1 and -5 and their descriptions? Do you intend to do any editing on this dataset, like adding or changing values in the nitrogen counts? As far as I know, if a coded value domain is active on a field, the only way to enter a value other than the ones specified in the domain is to use field calculator. This would make editing the attributes very cumbersome. – Dan Jurgella Apr 28 '15 at 13:07
  • @DanJurgella I've attached an image to the original question covering how the domain is coded. No I don't intend to edit the values in the attribute table as it is more of a read only data deliverable. Though if I did I'd simply remove the domain prior to editing. – MBT86 Apr 28 '15 at 13:27
  • In response to your original question: No, I don't think there is a way to BOTH alter the display precision and use a coded value domain; seems you can either do one or the other. As to the question of whether it is a good idea to use a domain in this manner... I can see how it might be useful in certain circumstances, but if I were unsure how the dataset would be used, or who would use it, I would probably leave it out and trust the metadata to do its job. – Dan Jurgella Apr 28 '15 at 14:01
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In response to your original question: No, I don't think there is a way to BOTH alter the display precision and use a coded value domain; seems you can either do one or the other. As to the question of whether it is a good idea to use a domain in this manner... I can see how it might be useful in certain circumstances, but if I were unsure how the dataset would be used, or who would use it, I would probably leave it out and trust the metadata to do its job.

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