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I would like to identify two types of raster alignment (assuming SRS is the same), but I am unsure of the correct terminology for these (or whether there is even a 'standard')?

First, there is 'pixel alignment'; i.e. pixels between 2 rasters are of the same resolution and share the same corner coordinate, but the rasters do not necessarily have the same extents.

Then, there is 'raster alignment' or origin alignment (or whatever), i.e. where two rasters share the same origin and extents.

  • I am not sure what the question is. Are you asking if your explanations are correct? – TsvGis Jun 26 '15 at 7:30
  • Im asking if there is an accepted terminology for these different types of alignment – James Jun 26 '15 at 7:31
  • I would say that if they share the same resolution, alignment, offset, scale and coordinate system then they are the same raster. – mdsumner Jun 26 '15 at 11:11
  • The common terminology for raster dimensions and alignment are: rows, columns, resolution, extent and origin. For two rasters to be "aligned", all of these conditions need to be met. – Jeffrey Evans Sep 4 '18 at 19:48
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    Possible duplicate of Adjective meaning "of the same resolution and extent" – Andre Silva Sep 24 '18 at 13:52
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I believe Jeffrey Evan's comment makes a good summary about the topic:

The common terminology for raster dimensions and alignment are: rows, columns, resolution, extent and origin. For two rasters to be "aligned", all of these conditions need to be met.

Besides that, they would need to be in the same Coordinate Reference System (CRS).


Complementary, some terms come to mind when trying to make two rasters to align:

  • snapping: when there is common resolution (cell size) and different cell’s coordinates.

    enter image description here

    Picture source: Esri, ArcGIS for Desktop.


  • resampling: when there is common origin and different resolutions.

    enter image description here

    Picture source: GISGeography.com.


  • projecting (or reprojecting): when there are different coordinate systems. Other common terms are: to 'convert' or 'transform' between coordinates and coordinate systems.

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