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I am having difficulties to transform a Shapefile in ArcGIS 10 from ETRS 1989 LAEA to WGS 1984 N33.

I have 2 files:

  1. in WGS1984 N33, with a grid of 10x10km,
  2. in ETRS 1989 LAEA, with small 100x100m polygones looking somewhat gridlike.

If I transform the ETRS-Shapefile (on the fly or using the transformation tool in Data Management), it remains skewed and does not align with the WGS1984 file (see picture with green the WGS file and lilac the transformed ETRS-file, where the horizontal lines are not identical)

enter image description here

Properties of the ETRS1989 before transformation:

Projected Coordinate System:    ETRS_1989_LAEA
Projection: Lambert_Azimuthal_Equal_Area
False_Easting:  4321000.00000000
False_Northing: 3210000.00000000
Central_Meridian:   10.00000000
Latitude_Of_Origin: 52.00000000
Linear Unit:    Meter

Geographic Coordinate System:   GCS_ETRS_1989
Datum:  D_ETRS_1989
Prime Meridian:     Greenwich
Angular Unit:   Degree

Properties of the WGS-File

Projected Coordinate System:    WGS_1984_UTM_Zone_33N
Projection: Transverse_Mercator
False_Easting:  500000.00000000
False_Northing: 0.00000000
Central_Meridian:   15.00000000
Scale_Factor:   0.99960000
Latitude_Of_Origin: 0.00000000
Linear Unit:    Meter

Geographic Coordinate System:   GCS_WGS_1984
Datum:  D_WGS_1984
Prime Meridian:     Greenwich
Angular Unit:   Degree
  • 1
    What are the horizontal/vertical lines in the 33N data? Do they represent latitude/longitude lines or are they blocks of UTM coordinates? If the LAEA squares were built in LAEA (they're parallel to lines of LAEA coordinates, they're almost certainly not going to align in UTM. The grid convergences will be different, for one thing. – mkennedy Aug 18 '15 at 16:34
  • Dear Mkennedy,the horizontal lines are from the UTM WGS file (done through creating a fishnet grid). I got the LAEA data from an external source (governmental) and I assume they have been built in LAEA. What do you mean by differences in grid convergence? – Irene Aug 19 '15 at 17:30
  • Irene, reproject the UTM data into LAEA in ArcMap. You should see them tilt in relation to LAEA data. Grid convergence is the angle between grid north (up on the 'map') versus the angle of the longitude line that passes through the point. They're going to be different in UTM versus LAEA. So the data will tilt when moved between the two coordsys. – mkennedy Aug 19 '15 at 17:34
  • Thanks - but it means that I cant project them nicely at all? I need to spatial join the information of the ETRS-File into the WGS-File and I dont really like to continue with the one file being tilt. I wonder how other people handle that? (Its data from the EEA - European Environmental Agency - and I am sure, I am not the only one doing some projection transformation but apparently I am the only one facing problems). – Irene Aug 20 '15 at 18:38
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As commented by @mkennedy:

reproject the UTM data into LAEA in ArcMap. You should see them tilt in relation to LAEA data. Grid convergence is the angle between grid north (up on the 'map') versus the angle of the longitude line that passes through the point. They're going to be different in UTM versus LAEA. So the data will tilt when moved between the two coordsys.

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