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This is just a simple curiosity but I haven't been able to find an answer. Qgis 2.14 will be the LTR, but when it was released it was posted as the current release with 2.8.7 still as the LTR. Will the LTR be 2.14.something in the future? What is the reason that it isn't posted as the LTR along with the current release?

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    AFAIK it is the LTR, see the tag – nmtoken Mar 22 '16 at 14:53
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    I see that it is tagged as the LTR, but the main qgis website still says that 2.8.7 is the LTR, while 2.14 is the current. That is what i'm curious about. – jamierob Mar 22 '16 at 15:00
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2.14 was initially released as a normal release and will be released as LTR when 2.16 (End of June 2016) is released.

This was introduced as a cool down period. This helps to identify and fix bugs (which inevitably are introduced throughout a development cycle) before releasing a version as "LTR - ready to be deployed to your critical production infrastructure".

As such, the current soon-to-be-LTR can - and should - be used to evaluate, test and harden the migration and application.

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I think it is mentioned in the changelog for QGIS 2.14.0:

If you are upgrading from QGIS 2.8 (our previous LTR version) you will find a great many new features in this release. We encourage you to peruse the changelogs for the intermediate non LTR 2.10 and 2.12 releases as this QGIS 2.14 includes all features published in those releases too. Note that 2.14 first enters the regular package repositories and will not immediately replace 2.8 in the LTR package repositories. That will happen when 2.16 is released.

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    That's what I was missing. Thanks for pointing that out! – jamierob Mar 22 '16 at 15:16
  • @jamierob - Most welcome buddy! =) – Joseph Mar 22 '16 at 15:18
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    ... this was introduced as a "cool down period". This helps to identify and fix bugs (which inevitably are introduced throughout a development cycle) before releasing a version as "LTR - ready to be deployed to your critical production infrastructure". As such, the current soon-to-be-LTR can be used to evaluate, test and harden the migration and application. – Matthias Kuhn Mar 22 '16 at 16:34
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    @jamierob - Agreed and I would suggest accepting his answer. Always good to get answers from the developers themselves ;) – Joseph Apr 6 '16 at 9:28
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    @Joseph This comment would be worth a badge :-) – Matthias Kuhn Apr 6 '16 at 9:37

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