I'm trying to make a completely new projection of the world in ArcMap. Many different projections are available, and I know they can be adapted by changing the parameters.

However, my goal is to create a completely new one (kind of the opposite of Robinson), as shown below. Does anyone know how to achieve this?

enter image description here

  • 1
    This isn't actually a GIS question, unless you want to know how to get Esri to adopt your projection in the Projection Engine (in which case, you need to make your projection so popular that customets start clamoring for its inclusion). – Vince Feb 3 '17 at 14:12
  • Are you sure that there is no way to see the coordinate sytem on the right in ArcMap without making Esri include it in their software? – F.Joosten Feb 3 '17 at 14:26
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    You can visualize anything you want to, but the only way to generate a new coordinate system is to have it adopted as a standard, and then added to the Esri code base by the PE development team (that's part and parcel with the "completely new projection") – Vince Feb 3 '17 at 14:53
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    Way back in ArcGIS 8, it was possible to code your own map projection algorithm and get it to work in ArcMap. However, we've added so much helping code--handling the projection horizon (edge), transformations, extents, etc. and entwined it into the geometry and display libraries that it no longer works to make your own. – mkennedy Feb 3 '17 at 19:55
up vote 3 down vote accepted

As commented by @Vince:

the only way to generate a new coordinate system [for ArcMap] is to have it adopted as a standard, and then added to the Esri code base by the [Projection Engine] development team

Interestingly, according to @mkennedy of that team:

Way back in ArcGIS 8 [circa 2000], it was possible to code your own map projection algorithm and get it to work in ArcMap. However, we've added so much helping code--handling the projection horizon (edge), transformations, extents, etc. and entwined it into the geometry and display libraries that it no longer works to make your own.

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