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When I use ArcScene 10.4 I can easily export 3D maps (VRML in *.wrl) which I then convert in FME to a *.prc file that can be imported in Adobe Acrobat PDF files (to create interactive 3D maps, readers can navigate, zoom, change colors, etc.)

However when I'm working with ArcGIS Pro, I can't find out how to do this. ArcGIS Pro works perfectly for visualizing 3D and it has many 3D tools and options, but the export of 3D features I haven't found (yet).

How do I export a 3D map from ArcGIS Pro?

(File types *.wrl, *.u3d or *.prc are all fine)

4

I've found a useful work around right now that works in FME

As a reader select your .shp file from ArcGIS Pro.

First you need to transform the shape to an 3D generated environment (important to select the base_elev of your shape (as surface level))

The second transformer extrudes the polygons by their approx_hei (the z-value in meters in your attribute table)

As a writer select a .prc writer (you need .prc for Adobe Acrobat Pro to generate 3D viewers) FME Workflow, ArcGIS Pro to 3D file (.prc for PDF)

(Note: the names in my FME are not perfect)

2

In ArcGIS Ideas there is an enhancement requested to Support Export of 3D PDF out of ArcGIS Pro which sounds like the requirement that you are trying to meet.

Consequently, it would appear that exporting to 3D PDF cannot be done by ArcGIS Pro 2.0 or earlier.

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Make sure a map or layout is your active view. On the Sharetab, in the Export group, click Map Export or Layout Export, depending on the active view. Browse to the location where you want to save the file. Type the File name. Click Save as type and choose a format. Type the Resolution (DPI). Check Embed Fonts to include embeddable fonts in your exported document. Note that fonts with licensing that does not allow embedding will not be included in your export regardless of this setting. For layouts, check Clip to Graphics Extent to include only the areas of the page that have map or layout element content, rather than exporting the entire page. Choose the Image Quality. This controls the quality of rasterized data going into the export. The default is Best, meaning the full resolution of the requested export. Changing to a lower option results in the rasterized data being down-sampled to a fraction of the chosen DPI. Optionally, if exporting to PDF or TIFF, click Export Options to set advanced options. Click OK when you're done. Compress vector graphics compresses the vector content streams in the PDF. This option should be left on unless clear text is desired for troubleshooting. Image Compression specifies how raster streams in the PDF are compressed. You can choose between using lossy but space-efficient JPEG compression, or lossless Flate compression. The Adaptive option mixes JPEG and Flate compression depending on the contents of the stream and is the default. Layers and attributes controls whether your PDF will contain layers like your map. Additionally, you can choose to include the attribute data from the features in the PDF. Be aware that including attributes for a large number of layers can affect the performance of the PDF. Export map georeference information controls whether geospatial information is included for the map frames in the PDF. If this information is included, readers of the PDF can extract x,y-coordinate information from the map frames and perform geographic measurement directly on the PDF map frame. Use password to restrict opening the document and accompanying password fields allow you to add a password to restrict opening of the resulting PDF document. Click Export. Share a map or layout as an image format (BMP,JPEG,PNG,TIFF,TGA,GIF) Make sure a map or layout is your active view. On the Sharetab, in the Export group, click Map Export or Layout Export, depending on the active view. Type the File name. Click Save As Type and choose the desired format. Type the Resolution (DPI). For maps, choose whether to generate a World File. The world file is used to contain georeference information so the image export can be used as raster data in ArcGIS Pro or other GIS applications. This option is unavailable for 3D view and layout exports. For layouts, check Clip to Graphics Extent to include only the areas of the page that have map or layout element content, rather than exporting the entire page. Choose the Color Mode. This controls how color in the map ends up in the export. Various choices for color mode are available depending on what is supported by file type. 32-bit with Alpha is capable of describing 16,777,216 different colors, and an alpha (transparency) channel of 255 different values. This color mode is useful for situations where maximum color fidelity and the ability to overlay the Map or Layout on another image transparently are important. 24-bit True Color is capable of reproducing 16,777,216 colors. This color mode is useful for situations where the maximum color fidelity is desired. 8-bit Adaptive Palette compresses the color information in your map or layout to 255 possible colors, using an adaptive palette to maintain recognizable hues. Because it stores significantly fewer bits per pixel while still maintaining color fidelity, this is a good choice when a small image file is desired. 8-bit Grayscale converts all of the colors in your map or layout into 256 shades of gray. This can be useful if the deliverable is a monochrome brochure or other single-color destination. Optionally, if exporting to TIF, click Export Options to set advanced options. Click OK when you're done. Image compression sets the method used to compress content within the TIF. The default is LZW. Unless you need to use a different or no compression for compatibility with an older graphic design application, you should leave this at the default setting. Include GeoTIFF tags to write GeoTIFF information directly into the TIF header. Note that this is independent from the Create a World File option. GIS-capable software can choose to honor the GeoTIFF information or the world file for these exports. Click Export.

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    this looks to me like just a huge wall of text nobody will find helpful. trim it down to the essantional parts – LaughU May 29 '18 at 20:46

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