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I am trying to do an analysis in ArcMap 10.3.1 using chlorophyll data from Ocean Color Web. I downloaded the data as a NetCDF file and used the Make NetCDF Raster Layer tool in order to add it to my map. When I do this, I get min/max values that are unreasonable (like 0.13 - 0.14), and furthermore, when I click around on that layer with the "identify" tool, it frequently reports cell values well outside of the maximum. These at least seem to make sense, but I was hoping to record the mean values that show up in the source tab as part of my analysis, and now I can't do that since I cannot trust those statistics. I feel like there has to be something stupid I'm missing here. Does anybody have a clue what's happening?

Here is an image showing what parameters I entered into the Make NetCDF Raster Layer Tool. Ignore the error about the file path- I just changed that because it had my name in it.

Here is an image showing the raster statistics from the source tab and the identify window, which shows a value that is clearly larger than the supposed maximum. You can see that they are the same layer as well.

  • Have you calculated your statistics? resources.arcgis.com/search/… – Michael Stimson Apr 29 '18 at 21:59
  • Okay, so in order to do this I had to export the data as a raster dataset, which seems to have resulted in the program automatically calculating the correct statistics on the new dataset. I got the same results after running the calculate statistics on the new raster. So I guess that solves the problem. I suppose I should have done this in the first place, but I'm still learning here. Thanks for your response. – Joe McGlynn Apr 30 '18 at 16:52
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In response to Michael Stimson's comment...

"Okay, so in order to calculate statistics I had to export the data as a raster dataset, which seems to have resulted in the program automatically calculating the correct statistics on the new dataset. I got the same results after running the calculate statistics on the new raster. So I guess that solves the problem. I suppose I should have done this in the first place, but I'm still learning here. Thanks for your response."

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