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Houdini has plugins that allow you to import an OSM file. For example an area of a city, bound by a rectangle of northeast and southwest latitudes and longitudes.

When you input the OSM data into Houdini it runs it through a small python script that calculates the area height in meters along the latitude (taking into consideration the curvature of the earth). Same for width in meters along longitude.

It then converts all the lat,lon points in the area and makes them relative to the southwest (min) corner, in the range of 0.0 to 1.0.

Finally it multiplies each point by the width and height values. This gives you points in a 2D plane, in meters that are scaled very closely to the source area.

What is this type of isolated projection called?

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As the question is written, it is an equirectangular projection centered on the coordinates of the suothwest corner.

that calculates the area height in meters along the latitude (taking into consideration the curvature of the earth). Same for width in meters along longitude.

If the result area is rectangular, width in meters is calculated for a single latitude value. Due to what is written below, the southest value is assumed.

converts all the lat,lon points in the area and makes them relative to the southwest (min) corner, in the range of 0.0 to 1.0.

It is dividing the difference between the coordinates of each point and the origin, by the total difference of longitude and latitude.

it multiplies each point by the width and height values.

Treat all the differences in longitude as if they represented the same difference in meters as in the southest latitude.

that are scaled very closely to the source area.

I dont'k know what Houdini is, but that statment depends of the other projection you are comparing the result.

  • Thanks Gabriel, Houdini is 3D software used to develop computer graphics for movies and video games. It represents everything in units like meters in x,y,z coordinates. – Thomas Kadlec Feb 13 at 18:02

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