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If a base station can keep a list of known rovers in the area and the rovers transmit their GPS information (coordinates) to the base station, can the base station correct their position ?

For instance would the following work as accurately as sending the corrections directly to the Rover ?

Rover A, has GPS position 13,23 Rover B, has GPS position 13,15

Base station has GPS position 5,2 Base station has known position of 1,1 Base station diff = 4,1

Rover A, is at location 9,22 (13-4),(23-1) Rover B, is at location 9,14 (13-4),(15-1)

** Added* The system is for asset tracking. The base station, needs to know where all rovers are with respect to it. The individual rovers are dumb and knowing its position means nothing to it. However, since RTCM is to make corrections AT the rover, I am looking to avoid that due to battery / energy / FCC band limits.

  • Isn't your idea just the opposite of how it usually works? You still need to transmit data, but instead of needing one transmitter (base), you now need as many transmitters as you have rovers. Not sure how this is better. – Gabriel C. Feb 21 at 15:53
  • @GabrielC. I am asset tracking. The devices themselves would have to transmit their position to a central hub or gateway. Having all the work done the central hub means less transmissions and might be easier to manage. – Frankie Feb 21 at 19:08
3

1)
In the simplest sense, a GPS position is actually a computed result using "pseudoranges" as inputs. A pseudorange is the distance between a GPS Receiver's antenna and a satellite's antenna, and the minimum pseudoranges required is four.

2)
All pseudoranges are inherently fraught with errors which is the reason why GPS positions are inaccurate. Now, if somehow these errors could be removed or minimized, the computed position's accuracy will improve. Differential Positioning refers to such a method, and in the simplest implementation, requires two GPS Receivers capable of outputting the pseudoranges for every satellites in view.

One GPS Receiver must remain stationery, and its coordinate must be known. This Receiver is called the "Base". Another GPS Receiver will occupy a location whose coordinate we want to determine. This Receiver is called the "Rover".

3)
RTCM refers to a standardized/well-known format for the Base to pass bias corrections (for the pseudoranges) to the Rover.


Reply to Comment

Using DGPS on the device requires RTCM being transmitted from base to device, where the correction is performed on the device. I will have a known base position (survey grade), but the base station needs to know where all rovers (mobile GPS units) are to coordinate events. Since RTCM is geared towards base->rover, I would like to NOT use RTCM but still obtain a sub meter accurate position.

In the GNSS community, "Base" or "Base Station" has a specific meaning and role as described in the answer above.

What you want is a (sort of) Processor Server that receives inputs from a Base Station and multiple Rovers (i.e., your moving/moveable assets), where the corrections are done by and at the Processor Server, and presumably the improved coordinates of the Rovers are then published to Message Queues or SQL tables, and etc.

Yes, technically, you can do all the above with a lot of programming works. And this statement assumes you already have the correct Rover hardware and SDK for accessing the hardware.

I would like to NOT use RTCM but still obtain a sub meter accurate position.

The resultant accuracy depends on many factors, among them the Rover antenna's type and built, will the Rover be blocked by any building on the property, or move/stay under foliage, and etc.

Can this be done accuratly (<1m accuracy) without the raw gps data and just nmea output ?

No, NMEA outputs coordinates which are results of computations. DGPS requires pseudoranges.

  • I appreciate the response but this did not answer my question. Using DGPS on the device requires RTCM being transmitted from base to device, where the correction is performed on the device. I will have a known base position (survey grade), but the base station needs to know where all rovers (mobile GPS units) are to coordinate events. Since RTCM is geared towards base->rover, I would like to NOT use RTCM but still obtain a sub meter accurate position. Does this clarify ? – Frankie Feb 21 at 19:12
  • Added some additional information to the body of my question. – Frankie Feb 21 at 19:16
  • That is exactly what I want - Processor Server. Can this be done accuratly (<1m accuracy) without the raw gps data and just nmea output ? If the base station uses the same hardware and is within 1-2km of the rover(s) ? – Frankie Feb 22 at 10:24

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