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If you were to draw a straight line, or dig a tunnel, through America, where would you end up?

To clarify:

Let's say you have a globe that sits upright on a table so that the south pole is on the table. You drill a hole, maybe a few holes, in America with a long drill bit, where is the other end of the hole?

The drill bit is parallel to the table surface.

Please note this line is not through the core of the earth, and I am not referring to the antipode of America, which is the Indian Ocean.

closed as off-topic by Spacedman, Erik, Hornbydd, J.R, PolyGeo Mar 27 at 21:58

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  • If you don't pass through the earth core, it's depends on the drill angle ? – J. Monticolo Mar 27 at 14:58
  • The drill angle is parallel to the table surface. – user237736 Mar 27 at 15:01
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    again even parallel to the surface you could end on any point of same latitude as the entry point, if you mean you have to cross the axis of rotation it's the same latitude as entry point and you can easily calculate the longitude.... – J.R Mar 27 at 15:07
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    I guess you are able to take a globe (or google earth), check the coordinates of any given point in America, e.g. Santiago de Chile, spin your globe by 180 degree and mark the point at the same latitude. So, what do you need us for? – Erik Mar 27 at 15:17
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because its a what if type question? – Hornbydd Mar 27 at 16:09
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If you start digging, parallel to the "table", near Kansas City (39N, -95W) you will end up in northwestern China, somewhere in the Taklamakan desert, the next village is called "Qarqan". How to calculate: -95 + 180 = 85E --> (39N, 85E). Approx as the earth is not a perfect globe.

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If I understand the question, starting from a point at a given lat;long, you want to know the location of another point at the same longitude but on the other side of the equator.

You can then just change the sign (side of the earth) of the latitude: New York is around 40N 74W, so the imaginary North/South cutter will put a point at 40S 74W, a bit west of the shore of Chile

  • I want the same latitude, not the same longitude. The drill bit is parallel to the table. – user237736 Mar 27 at 15:06

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